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East Coast Hard pack/Ice

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Any east coat skiiers have any advice on what they set their edges at. I thought I had mine set at a three but the surface we had today on the slopes didnt feel like I had any edges. Maybe no matter what you have your edges set to theres just some ice/hard pack that you cant bite into? Or maybe I'm not sharpening my edges right?

post #2 of 6

My edges get set to 1/3 (1 on the base, 3 on the sides).  However, there's more to edge grip then just the edge angles; ski construction, shape and your technique all play important roles.

 

There were definitely areas out there this weekend that were akin to pond ice that nothing less then an ice skate would have gripped on.

post #3 of 6

Another thing, besides ski construction is that the edges have to be sharp.  Often it seems, even right after a tune paid for at a ski shop, the edges are not sharp. Why?  I don't know.  I can only guess that sharp to some people just means sharper than they were when you brought them in, not sharp enough to shave with.  Another thing to check is did they actually tune the ski to 1/2 base three side, or whether they just told you the tune was 1 base 3 side and tuned them to 1 base 1 side like they had their machine set up. 

post #4 of 6

If the ice has high moisture content, you will need a stiff ski in addition to a sharp, highly beveled edge. This is to exert pressure on the edge. Also, get some weight on the entire ski to use the entire edge (most people don't pressure the tip on ice). good luck.

post #5 of 6

If it's bullet proof in places I just "slide it out" over that terrain. If you try to stay on up on edge the whole time and lose that edge bite you will have a problem. I find it's more graceful and a lot less taxing on my old body to control the slide (less pressure). If you rely on your edges being "sharp enough", what are you going to do when they dull after a few runs?

post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattL View Post

If it's bullet proof in places I just "slide it out" over that terrain. If you try to stay on up on edge the whole time and lose that edge bite you will have a problem. I find it's more graceful and a lot less taxing on my old body to control the slide (less pressure). If you rely on your edges being "sharp enough", what are you going to do when they dull after a few runs?

 

Isn't this why we have ski quivers?  When the edges get dull, you head back to the car and get another pair!

 

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