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High Performance MA Please - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Zentune:
blake...i haven't taken such an exam myself, and i DO love to watch a great skier making what i call "zesty" turns (think energy married with grace wink.gif) but i can imagine, for the short radius and corridor turns, the examiners would probably want to see a certain "uniformity" to the turns...to be sure the skier in question can produce them again and again...just a thought.

 

That's a good point and it's really true.  What he does in the test may need to be different than what he could do outside of the test in his own general freeskiing.  My suggestions are not necessarily for the test.  I know nothing about those tests, and he doesn't need to take my advice if he doesn't want to whether he is in or out of the test.  They're just suggestions. 


Edited by Ronin - 1/22/13 at 4:26pm
post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
  1. ..
  2. JB flexes significantly more to release and holds this flex through the transition - only starts extending after he is tipping onto his new edges. This allows him to get his skis on edge sooner than you do, and complete more of the turn above the fall line. The result is must more energy out of the skis, and preservation of momentum from turn to turn.
  3. In the longer turns (as shown in the corridor segment) you are so square to your skis that you actually rotate into the hill prior to release. JB, while still "square" by most standards is NOT rotated into the hill. You both could do well with a good dose of rotational counter, but you more-so.

 

In the video I see a moment of hesitation right at the fall line. Perhaps a bit of body lock-down right at maximum g-force.

 

I think that is the root cause of Heluva's #2 and #3.

 

#2: The OP isn't flexing to release because he's still in 'lock down'. By the time the lock down is released, it's too late to use the energy from the skis to pop the transition and get on to the new edges sooner.

 

#3:  He can't start the counter while in lock down, so he ends up rotated into the hill.

 

When I find myself where I'm having a similar hesitation, I try to do drills that don't allow a static position to develop. I like the 1000 steps drill and White Pass turns.

 

If I may be so bold, the OP should work on retraction transitions starting the retraction at the fall line.

 

Still, though I said all that, it's great skiing.

post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

 

2. JB flexes significantly more to release and holds this flex through the transition - only starts extending after he is tipping onto his new edges. This allows him to get his skis on edge sooner than you do, and complete more of the turn above the fall line. The result is must more energy out of the skis, and preservation of momentum from turn to turn.

 

Cheers.

I agree with your assessments Heluva. Regarding the flexing I think some elaboration may be worthwhile. What does flexing really mean in a high performance turn? It is not enough just to flex, because if you are in balance and just flex you will simply sink to the ground. In a high performance turn you need float, a light phase in transition. This means that the CoM must travel in an up then down trajectory in transition.  Rollo creates this float by pushing, he even involves the arms in doing so. However, if you want to have fast, high energy turns you need to flex, so you need to create the float in some other way. You need to create an imbalance that ejects you out of the turn. This can be done simply by increasing edging towards the end of the turn. Then it becomes natural and necessary to retract, otherwise you will fly. Flexing should preferably start before the maximum angulation because bending the legs facilitates edging. Part of the ejection/vaulting comes from the changing instantaneous slope angle.

There is very little energy stored in the skis, certainly not enough to create any significant float on a flat surface.

post #34 of 36

Blake, you're a great skier. You also clearly want to help people develop. I definitely don't have a problem with you. I simply asked questions to try and stimulate some growth in your assessment and development--and to see where you were going with your feedback. I see you're not receptive to such questions; no problem. Enjoy your turns!

post #35 of 36

Your questions are fine metaphor.  It's just sometimes hard to determine tone etc in writing.  I am sorry for interpreting your questions as being more argumentative than you meant them.  My point of view is different and I have noticed in the past that some people don't like it on this forum.  Next time I will give you the benefit of the doubt.  Don't hold back your questions.  I'll understand them differently next time and I suppose it did lead me to think through what I was saying more than I otherwise would have. 

 

On a related note, I can see why my first paragraph in post 24 would seem aggressive (I'm sorry for that too), but after that I was mainly just trying to be very thorough because I thought that I needed to be in order to be understood.  I just thought you really weren't getting what I was saying or that you didn't want to hear it.  I'll try to be a lot more receptive in the future. 

 

There is definitely room for growth in my assessment ability.  After I make a video this year (assuming it snows), I am going to ask this forum to explain the differences between my way of skiing and a racer's or other people's who have a more technical point of view.  I hope that you'll post on that thread when I make it. 


Edited by Ronin - 1/23/13 at 1:47pm
post #36 of 36

It's my bad. You weren't asking for a lesson and I have no right to try and force such a lesson on anyone. I'm sorry!

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