or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

best image stabilization?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Looking for more than a point and shoot. either a micro4/3 or larger. But the criterion is that it must have killer image stabilization. Although color, contrast, brightness, etc can all be edited in post, blurry pixels cannot be fixed ( well, adobe did showcase software that can track the path of a blurry pixel and process the image to correct it-but still experimental). I have seen the olympus 0md5 but have heard that sony is better. Any experiences here?

post #2 of 5

I have a Sony dSLR a700, I like the In-Body image stabilization, and newer generations have no doubt gotten much better. The Olympus 5 axis IS sounds like it is phenomenal, and the OMd5 looks like a truly great camera. I kind of lust after one... OK, not kind of, I do. I really like the m4/3 lens selection and size. the Sony NEX is such a cool format, but the ASPC sized sensor means big lenses and it being relatively new means Sony doesn't have the lens selection 'fleshed-out' yet.

post #3 of 5

Pentax has killer in-camera image stabilization, too. 
 

post #4 of 5

I've heard very good things about the stabilization on the OMD. I haven't used it though. I have a M43 camera (the panasonic gh2), though and have been very happy with it/M43 lenses.

 

This may be unnecessary to add, but I'll throw it out there as it's a skiing forum: Even the best image stabilization won't help if the blurring is caused by the subject moving. Budget for fast lenses no matter what camera you choose if you're planning on taking photos of things that aren't sitting still in low light.

post #5 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcusBrody View Post

This may be unnecessary to add, but I'll throw it out there as it's a skiing forum: Even the best image stabilization won't help if the blurring is caused by the subject moving. Budget for fast lenses no matter what camera you choose if you're planning on taking photos of things that aren't sitting still in low light.

 

What he said ^^^^^. Image stabilization compensates for camera movement, not subject movement.

 

Also worth noting (and this gets technical): Mirrorless cameras in general have very accurate autofocusing, but they all have some trouble with moving subjects. They use something called Contrast Detect Auto Focus (CDAF). It works well, but determining which direction to move in order to achieve focus is a matter of trial-and-error. DSLRs, on the other hand, use Phase Detect Auto Focus (PDAF) when using the eye level viewfinder. PDAF is not as accurate as CDAF, but it is much more effective on a moving subject because it is able to determine the correct direction to move to achieve focus. Even the excellent Olympus OMD (a mirrorless CDAF camera, even though it looks like a DSLR) is known to have some trouble with moving subjects.

 

Nonetheless, CDAF is improving. Many cameras using CDAF can achieve focus on still subjects just as quickly as DSLRs. Some hybrid systems are starting to appear, with the intention of improving performance on moving subjects. Also, DSLRs revert to CDAF (and often a rather mediocre implementation of it) when using the LCD to compose the image.

 

So, the field is changing. Always read reviews carefully. Sometimes they contain useful information on this particular point, and sometimes they don't.

 

Final note: If you do get a DSLR, not all lenses are created equal. Some focus faster than others. Most kit lenses today have excellent glass, but they give up build quality and focusing speed to get the price down. A few "consumer" grade lenses have remarkably fast focusing speed, but those expensive large-aperture pro lenses always focus quickly.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion