or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Member Gear Reviews › REVIEW: 2014 Blizzard Brahma
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

REVIEW: 2014 Blizzard Brahma - Page 2

post #31 of 90

I haven't skied the 8.5 and I only skied the Brahmas for a couple of runs but I think a "racy" ski it the ticket for a lot of skiers on hard snow or "on-piste" and I didn't find the Brahma to be "racy".   It is more laid back than race carvers although I was laying deep trenches on the soft groomers that day.  It just didn't have the energy, explosiveness on exit, or precision of a race ski or even skis like the MX78/88, m-power or EDT 84 which I have skied.  It is more relaxed than those others.

 

When I skied it, the word "approachable" kept popping into my head.  I don't know if this makes sense but for a lot of intermediate-expert skiers, the sport is as much and "activity" as a "sport".  The Brahma doesn't require you to be super athletic and all over your game all of the time, but it does allow you to rip all over the mountain and have a good time.   I could easily see a lot of people being happy with this as a 90% of the time ski, and I bet a lot of people would find themselves feeling like better skiers by updating to Brahmas.

post #32 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

I've met a bunch of Epicski members over the years... don't go throwing stones when it comes to aesthetics, we are not an attractive bunch.

That's funny! ROTF.gif

post #33 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

I've met a bunch of Epicski members over the years... don't go throwing stones when it comes to aesthetics, we are not an attractive bunch.

post #34 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

I've met a bunch of Epicski members over the years... don't go throwing stones when it comes to aesthetics, we are not an attractive bunch.


I don't know what you're talking about. I'm awesome !biggrin.gif

 

IMG_1120.JPG

post #35 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

 

Orrrr.... Brahma for the "race skis are dorky" demographic, and 8.5 for the "that bull is ugly" demographic

roflmao.gif

post #36 of 90

Interesting...looks very cool to me as I am trying to get to a 2 ski quiver.  Is it a twin tip?  Anyway had another fun experience last weekend skiing with my son.  It was an increasingly warmer MI groomer day and we lapping the chairs until 7pm.  Day started out colder with hard corduroy, then it rained for 90 minutes.  The weather dried out all day and the temps warmed to 40.  The snow turned out great, fast, fun and more and more soft turning bumpy and cruddy.  I (45 years, 5'10" 165lbs, aggressive) only took out my Volkl 6 Star at 168 (67mm waist) and my son was riding Nordica Dead Money at 170 (86mm waist).  We have the same BSL and traded skis all day long, his idea, not mine.  This isn't a Dead Money review (or is it) but rather how it opened my eyes.

 

Blizzard is really on to something with this ski, their Magnum 8.5 has been successful and the Brahma maybe very similar but in a more freeride form without park/pipe terms.

 

I have always loved my 6 Stars but the Dead Moneys were just more fun and versatile and I was surprised by the overall versatility of the "park ski/all mountain ski".  I like a ski with egde grip capable of holding high angles at high speed and the Nordica Dead Money was surprisingly tenacious for a non metal ski, it was very very fun.  In moguls it was more forgiving and fun and the wider waist owned the crud better.  So...this day has me totally reconsidering my quiver...Atomic Coax 183, Volkl Mantra 2008, 177 and the 6 stars.  Since, last weekend I have been researching mid 80mm waisted twin tips to replace the 6 stars and the Mantras while keeping the Coax.  My point again, Blizzard is on to something with this ski and the timing of your review was very ironic because this is a ski that fits the bill.  Before riding the Dead Money my thoughts were "it doesn't have any metal and it wouldn't be enough ski for me", I was wrong, it is sidewall constructed, burly and not particularly light, neither are the 6 stars though, or the Mantras for that matter.  So the metal in Brahma would be interesting to try and the dimension and radius seem really good.  I can see a ski like the Brahma at mid 80 waist measurement and a ski like the Coax at 105 being all you would need, for a guy my size... in my opinion. 

 

Thanks for the review. 

post #37 of 90
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by EWA113 View Post

Interesting...looks very cool to me as I am trying to get to a 2 ski quiver.  Is it a twin tip?  Anyway had another fun experience last weekend skiing with my son.  It was an increasingly warmer MI groomer day and we lapping the chairs until 7pm.  Day started out colder with hard corduroy, then it rained for 90 minutes.  The weather dried out all day and the temps warmed to 40.  The snow turned out great, fast, fun and more and more soft turning bumpy and cruddy.  I (45 years, 5'10" 165lbs, aggressive) only took out my Volkl 6 Star at 168 (67mm waist) and my son was riding Nordica Dead Money at 170 (86mm waist).  We have the same BSL and traded skis all day long, his idea, not mine.  This isn't a Dead Money review (or is it) but rather how it opened my eyes.

 

Blizzard is really on to something with this ski, their Magnum 8.5 has been successful and the Brahma maybe very similar but in a more freeride form without park/pipe terms.

 

I have always loved my 6 Stars but the Dead Moneys were just more fun and versatile and I was surprised by the overall versatility of the "park ski/all mountain ski".  I like a ski with egde grip capable of holding high angles at high speed and the Nordica Dead Money was surprisingly tenacious for a non metal ski, it was very very fun.  In moguls it was more forgiving and fun and the wider waist owned the crud better.  So...this day has me totally reconsidering my quiver...Atomic Coax 183, Volkl Mantra 2008, 177 and the 6 stars.  Since, last weekend I have been researching mid 80mm waisted twin tips to replace the 6 stars and the Mantras while keeping the Coax.  My point again, Blizzard is on to something with this ski and the timing of your review was very ironic because this is a ski that fits the bill.  Before riding the Dead Money my thoughts were "it doesn't have any metal and it wouldn't be enough ski for me", I was wrong, it is sidewall constructed, burly and not particularly light, neither are the 6 stars though, or the Mantras for that matter.  So the metal in Brahma would be interesting to try and the dimension and radius seem really good.  I can see a ski like the Brahma at mid 80 waist measurement and a ski like the Coax at 105 being all you would need, for a guy my size... in my opinion. 

 

Thanks for the review. 

I think you are on the right track. I did some clinicing on the Brahma yesterday and from tight bumps to high speed carves, the Brahma performed just as I would have expected so it could easily be a strong foundation for a 2 ski quiver. 

post #38 of 90

I seem to recall Dynastar's "Big Dump" a few years ago. That was one for the ages. 

post #39 of 90

I love Blizzard Bull line, and bonafide are great skies;

however the graphics for 2014 line is NOT great (in my opinion).

Before Blizzard had a charging Bull and 2014 line is simply MAD COW and this is depressing.

 

 

But since I do like these ski and I missed an opportunity to buy 2013, I will buy 2014 with not inspiring graphics, just wish Blizzard would not converted bull into cow

 

Oleg

post #40 of 90
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg S View Post

I love Blizzard Bull line, and bonafide are great skies;

however the graphics for 2014 line is NOT great (in my opinion).

Before Blizzard had a charging Bull and 2014 line is simply MAD COW and this is depressing.

 

 

But since I do like these ski and I missed an opportunity to buy 2013, I will buy 2014 with not inspiring graphics, just wish Blizzard would not converted bull into cow

 

Oleg

I like the 14 graphics of the Bonafide, it has the red front half of the 13 and the gray tail of the 12. A win/win. 

post #41 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

 

Orrrr.... Brahma for the "race skis are dorky" demographic, and 8.5 for the "that bull is ugly" demographic

 

this was my initial reaction as well. I look forward to testing these next week and i will have my 8.5's for back2back comps.  I think I am getting old as I don't seem to get this ski however, I love the graphics.  I absolutely love the 8.5's precision, stability and ease on soft groomers so I am not sure why I want a TT ski that pretty much does the same.  I do wonder if its just a touch easier in bumps.  That said, if I didn't have the 8.5 then I guess is would have some appeal to me.  Hows that for nonsense? 


Edited by Finndog - 1/27/13 at 5:05am
post #42 of 90
Thread Starter 
Even though the Magnum 8.5 and Brahma have similar shapes, size and are both flip core skis, they both have a distinct feel with the Brahma being more soft snow/off piste oriented.
post #43 of 90

looking forward to testing them. icon14.gif

post #44 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski the East View Post

What is the benefit of tail rocker in a ski this narrow?  I get it for real powder skis, but how does it help an 88mm waisted ski that is on the stiffer side?  I would think you would only want tip rocker on a ski like this.

 

STE

 

OK,

got a moment, a little wine in me, and a very negative impression of tail rocker in skis like this...

so, I thought I'd try to answer your question, Ski the East. (by the way, I've never skied the east, except roller skis in summer)

 

are people still allowed to not think blizzards are great around here?

I like the gearheads who love these brahma skis, but I am the exact opposite of a fan of this design.

Yes, I've skied em, and yes, I do know why someone would like them, I just don't know if it's a good diversion.

 

blizzard found an image that sales, and got some hype, so why not build on it and try to sell more on the coat tails...

 

the benefit of tail rocker is that people who may have some trouble releasing their edges between turns in broken snow are less likely to "catch an edge" and get shot out of the turn, or if they are getting stuck w/ their balance aft (or just tend to ski aft), they can still break into skid and a "real" tail doesn't toss 'em.

but,

there are an awful lot of negatives that go along with those positives.

 

really the main benefit is marketing something new and different in this niche and using the momentum of the hyped skis.

 

88 mm skis are mostly "on the snow", and imo, forget the tail rocker, but look to maybe a couple mm of early rise so they are less likely to spear soft bumps.

 

 

cheers,

Holiday


Edited by Holiday - 1/27/13 at 7:01pm
post #45 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post

 

the benefit of tail rocker is that people who may have some trouble releasing their edges between turns in broken snow are less likely to "catch an edge" and get shot out of the turn, or if they are getting stuck w/ their balance aft (or just tend to ski aft), they can still break into skid and a "real" tail doesn't toss 'em.

but,

there are an awful lot of negatives that go along with those positives.

 

cheers,

Holiday

I respect your opinion, but similar things could be said about "real" tails, that if you are centered and in balance on the ski there is no downside to a slight amount of tail rocker (or a twintip), they only wash-out when you are relying on them to 'catch' you as you push them out to get angles or if you finish turns way in the back seat. modern skiing doesn't require dramatic weight shifts fore-aft like straight skis did... time to evolve. People who can get the ski on edge early and keep the ski on edge and loaded don't need the added training wheel of a flat tail.

 

... that could be said.

post #46 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

I respect your opinion, but similar things could be said about "real" tails, that if you are centered and in balance on the ski there is no downside to a slight amount of tail rocker (or a twintip), they only wash-out when you are relying on them to 'catch' you as you push them out to get angles or if you finish turns way in the back seat. modern skiing doesn't require dramatic weight shifts fore-aft like straight skis did... time to evolve. People who can get the ski on edge early and keep the ski on edge and loaded don't need the added training wheel of a flat tail.

 

... that could be said.

Hum,

devils advocate maybe?

 

if there is no downside to twin tips or tail rocker, why don't we see them on race skis, or skis designed for freeski competitions.

I FEEL quite a few downsides to tail rocker skis when I ski them. I do not ski in the backseat, or need training wheels. I like an edge to behave similiarly from tip to tail and be cohesive and predicable. I'm not constantly carving or loading skis radically, and there has been lots of video of my "boring" skiing posted here. I also spent many days skiing w/ lots of aging world class skiers over the years, so I know how they ski and what skis work as well.

I also hated the feeling of radical twin tips and felt it cheapened the turn (for instance: K2 seth, original nordica enforcer, salomon pocket rocket) that said, I skied and loved the elan 888 the last few days, and it has a minor turn up to the tail, albeit square and moderate.

 

as maybe the only gear guru here I haven't skied w/, so not knowing your skiing,  I wonder if you really like these rocker things better then a more traditional tail when skiing "on' the snow? 

 

cheers,

holiday

post #47 of 90

This is kind of a funny conversation in regards to this ski.  The tail rocker is extremely minimal.

 

As for tail rocker in general, I find *some* tail rocker very useful in powder / softer snow, in particular for the ability to throw the skis sideways with ease.  Considering the Brahma is an 88mm ski with a soft snow bias, having that tiny little bit of tail rocker seems to make sense.

post #48 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post

Hum,

devils advocate maybe?

 

if there is no downside to twin tips or tail rocker, why don't we see them on race skis, or skis designed for freeski competitions.

 

Easy answer: Both racers and freeski competitors often skip the backseat all together and are struggling to pull themselves out of the trunk during a run, sure, the best athletes on snow recover quickly and make it look OK, but they are off balance fairly regularly. That's what I think, anyway.

 

I wasn't trying to insult your skiing anymore than you were trying to insulting anyone who finds rockered tail skis fun. Read what you wrote, it was more than "I don't like 'em" it was "they are fine... if you suck".

 

As far as my personal feelings? I think it's simple, ditch camber and you diminish rebound energy, sometimes I care and sometimes I don't. There are lots of things I like about them and certain times I find them less than inspiring, generally low speed tight spaces = good, higher speeds in open spaces = bad. I do think they make skiing 'easier' and in many ways 'dumber' but anyone who skis should appreciate the term "stupid fun", right? If I spent my days skiing out west I would ski stiffer skis with less sidecut and firmer tails... but after spending a season skiing 194cm Stockli Scot Schmidt Pro's in Stowe trees I woke up and realized that HERE, a looser ski that can be smeared makes skiing more fun. It's hard to understand the demands of Northern VT tree skiing without really experiencing it, that sound self-important, but it's true. There is nothing quite like it. Right now I am enjoying my Nordica Girish a lot. I don't know if that gives me more cred? I'm feeling pretty meh about new skis at the moment, I'll be doing a ton of testing over the coming month, hopefully I'll fall in love with something, right now skiing is always fun on anything... but nothing has me feeling like I'm riding naked on the back of a unicorn through an asteroid shower of rainbow stars.

 

Hopefully we can ski sometime. I'll keep my pants on, I promise.

post #49 of 90
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

This is kind of a funny conversation in regards to this ski.  The tail rocker is extremely minimal.

As for tail rocker in general, I find *some* tail rocker very useful in powder / softer snow, in particular for the ability to throw the skis sideways with ease.  Considering the Brahma is an 88mm ski with a soft snow bias, having that tiny little bit of tail rocker seems to make sense.
I agree, I have no problem with some rise tip and tail on the brahma because of the direction of the ski. Now, if this discussion was about the Magnum 8.5, I would tend to agree with Holiday, that ski with it's hard snow bias, I could see the argument being made for a flat tail, in fact I preferred the old Magnum 8.7 for what it was, over the new flip core versions. Knowing Holidays skiing style, I can understand why he likes a cambered to the tail ski, that's why there are different skis in different segments. At 88 underfoot, the main players are the kendo, experience 88, bmx88' mx88' and the Bushwacker, I will throw in two 90mm skis with the Steadfast and Rev 90 and for measure, since it was brought up elsewhere, the 888. All great skis in their own right and on their own merits. Where will the Brahma chips fall at the end? Not sure, but I do know the cream usually rises to the top and I think the Brahma will fair pretty well when all is said and done. I don't think the boys at Blizzard will be loosing much sleep thinking "if we only...."
post #50 of 90

So now that I've skied the Brahma (thanks Phil), I have to say it's an interesting and unique ski.  The conditions at Squaw were, as described by one local snow forecaster, "dust on glacier" - so maybe not ideal for the softer snow oriented Brahma but there was enough variety (including areas of wind blown powder that was at least 6 inches deep) to test it out in a lot of different ways.

 

The rocker is subtle but fairly deep like many of the Blizzard flipcore skis, but you don't often see that on a design that's only 88mm underfoot.  It's sort of like a mini powder ski so those folks who aren't big fans of 100mm+ powder skis and say they prefer to get deep into the snow would probably love it, as they'd still have the lesser float but enough rocker to keep the tips moving upwards.  But I could also definitely see taking them out when it hasn't snowed at all - I'd like try them again on a nice spring day.

 

The ski in this range I've spent the most time on and own is the Volkl Kendo - the 2011 version before they added early rise.  With a stiffer flex, there's no question it has a higher speed limit and can charge a lot harder, especially on firmer and chunky chopped up snow, but the Brahma held its own and demonstrated pretty reliable edge hold as well.  I suspect on softer groomers it could really rail and be a lot of fun.

 

Fun is the word that comes to mind with the Brahma; they're quick in the trees (I was on the 180 and they felt as if they were 10cm shorter) and a good ski to hit little features with, while soft enough to make the landings easy without feeling like noodles elsewhere.  Very versatile.  Those same attributes also allow it to excel in the bumps, even the firm and icy ones I was using them on.  Bumps are not one of my strengths so the ease with which I could release my edges (likely due to the aforementioned very slight tail rocker) and steer the skis was a huge plus.  They were very forgiving of my sloppy technique.  If you're a big fan of bump skiing, chances are you'll love the Brahma.  If you're strictly about hard charging down the fall line, you might want something a bit stiffer depending on your weight (I'm 170 pounds).

post #51 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

So now that I've skied the Brahma (thanks Phil), I have to say it's an interesting and unique ski.  The conditions at Squaw were, as described by one local snow forecaster, "dust on glacier" - so maybe not ideal for the softer snow oriented Brahma but there was enough variety (including areas of wind blown powder that was at least 6 inches deep) to test it out in a lot of different ways.

 

The rocker is subtle but fairly deep like many of the Blizzard flipcore skis, but you don't often see that on a design that's only 88mm underfoot.  It's sort of like a mini powder ski so those folks who aren't big fans of 100mm+ powder skis and say they prefer to get deep into the snow would probably love it, as they'd still have the lesser float but enough rocker to keep the tips moving upwards.  But I could also definitely see taking them out when it hasn't snowed at all - I'd like try them again on a nice spring day.

 

The ski in this range I've spent the most time on and own is the Volkl Kendo - the 2011 version before they added early rise.  With a stiffer flex, there's no question it has a higher speed limit and can charge a lot harder, especially on firmer and chunky chopped up snow, but the Brahma held its own and demonstrated pretty reliable edge hold as well.  I suspect on softer groomers it could really rail and be a lot of fun.

 

Fun is the word that comes to mind with the Brahma; they're quick in the trees (I was on the 180 and they felt as if they were 10cm shorter) and a good ski to hit little features with, while soft enough to make the landings easy without feeling like noodles elsewhere.  Very versatile.  Those same attributes also allow it to excel in the bumps, even the firm and icy ones I was using them on.  Bumps are not one of my strengths so the ease with which I could release my edges (likely due to the aforementioned very slight tail rocker) and steer the skis was a huge plus.  They were very forgiving of my sloppy technique.  If you're a big fan of bump skiing, chances are you'll love the Brahma.  If you're strictly about hard charging down the fall line, you might want something a bit stiffer depending on your weight (I'm 170 pounds).

Have you ever skied the Mag 8.5? Curious how close/different they are?

post #52 of 90

^^ I have not, but I would expect the 8.5 to be a little more chargy based on what I've heard.

post #53 of 90

We've got some on-the-snow action on the Blizzard Brahma with Philpug and Shane at Squaw Valley, check it out:

 

 

More info here


Edited by Start Haus - 1/29/13 at 9:46am
post #54 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Start Haus View Post

We've got some on-the-snow action on the Blizzard Brahma with Philpug and Shane at Squaw Valley, check it out:

 

 

looking good phil and shane. get rid of the background music so we can hear what you have to say.

great to see you ski, Shane. reminds me of skiing w/ your Dad... go figure.

 

ski looks like it works well.

cheers,

holiday

post #55 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Easy answer: Both racers and freeski competitors often skip the backseat all together and are struggling to pull themselves out of the trunk during a run, sure, the best athletes on snow recover quickly and make it look OK, but they are off balance fairly regularly. That's what I think, anyway.

 

I wasn't trying to insult your skiing anymore than you were trying to insulting anyone who finds rockered tail skis fun. Read what you wrote, it was more than "I don't like 'em" it was "they are fine... if you suck".

 

As far as my personal feelings? I think it's simple, ditch camber and you diminish rebound energy, sometimes I care and sometimes I don't. There are lots of things I like about them and certain times I find them less than inspiring, generally low speed tight spaces = good, higher speeds in open spaces = bad. I do think they make skiing 'easier' and in many ways 'dumber' but anyone who skis should appreciate the term "stupid fun", right? If I spent my days skiing out west I would ski stiffer skis with less sidecut and firmer tails... but after spending a season skiing 194cm Stockli Scot Schmidt Pro's in Stowe trees I woke up and realized that HERE, a looser ski that can be smeared makes skiing more fun. It's hard to understand the demands of Northern VT tree skiing without really experiencing it, that sound self-important, but it's true. There is nothing quite like it. Right now I am enjoying my Nordica Girish a lot. I don't know if that gives me more cred? I'm feeling pretty meh about new skis at the moment, I'll be doing a ton of testing over the coming month, hopefully I'll fall in love with something, right now skiing is always fun on anything... but nothing has me feeling like I'm riding naked on the back of a unicorn through an asteroid shower of rainbow stars.

 

Hopefully we can ski sometime. I'll keep my pants on, I promise.

 

got it, my bad if I came off as insulting anything w/ tail rocker. I lose a bit of my neutral nature after a bottle of wine. didn't mean to insult, just disillusioned w/ some of the skis people think are so great. i'm turning into an old curmudeon. but at least i feel like i'm riding on the back of a unicorn through an astroid shower.... w/ my pants on.

 

cheers,

holiday

post #56 of 90

How would characteristics and flex of the Brahma be compared to the Bushwackers in terms of low speed behavior?

 

Will all I notice is inceased dampness and a quieter ski at speed?

post #57 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post

 

looking good phil and shane. get rid of the background music so we can hear what you have to say.

great to see you ski, Shane. reminds me of skiing w/ your Dad... go figure.

 

ski looks like it works well.

cheers,

holiday

There's no background music - did you have multiple windows open? Maybe picking up radio stations on your fillings? smile.gif

post #58 of 90

Gald you say that because I didnt' hear anything either. Sound quality was actually good considering it was done outdoors.  Can you please add a quick overview of the ski's profile in the future?

post #59 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post

 

. i'm turning into an old curmudeon. but at least i feel like i'm riding on the back of a unicorn through an astroid shower.... w/ my pants on.

 

cheers,

holiday

That's like wearing a rain coat in the shower.

post #60 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday View Post

 

got it, my bad if I came off as insulting anything w/ tail rocker. I lose a bit of my neutral nature after a bottle of wine. didn't mean to insult, just disillusioned w/ some of the skis people think are so great. i'm turning into an old curmudeon. but at least i feel like i'm riding on the back of a unicorn through an astroid shower.... w/ my pants on.

 

cheers,

holiday

Soooooo, in your defense......not that you need it. 

I've been skiing my Blizzard Sambas 85% of the time, because they're so darn good in so many conditions.  But this week was a groomer specific ski week here in Tahoe and I pulled out my fully cambered skis.  I gotta say, it was fun and I had some "Ah Ha!" moments.  

 

The reality is, for most skiers the Blizzard Flip Core line is a great every day ski that can be super fun on most any terrain. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Member Gear Reviews
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Member Gear Reviews › REVIEW: 2014 Blizzard Brahma