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Hot Scraping And Averaging Down The Wax

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

So if I use a yellow or base prep wax to hot scrape, and then use the harder wax for colder weather, don't the two blend and become an amalgamated wax best used for warmer weather than intended?  Would it make sense to use the next warmer wax from the wax chosen for the hot scrape to ensure the hardness intended when completed?  Or at least something closer?

post #2 of 8

From the paper on Wax Science on the Dominator web site, one of the main differences between a base prep wax and a soft HC wax like a "yellow" is that the base prep wax does not affect the daily wax. With regular HC waxes you get some impact on the new wax. If you use a yellow, a CH 10, and then put a CH 6 on top there will be some blending and  you should be getting in the base something like an 8. I imagine it would not actually be a 50/50 blend but your concept of blending is right as I understand the process.

post #3 of 8

I'm not convinced that there is a 'blending' so much as a 'stratification and limited mixing'.     

 

Kinda like if you put brazil nuts and peanuts in a can, they're not going to uniformly self-distribute and average out to a can of cashews.

 

I think that the hard wax molecules will tend to harden soonest (air side) while the soft wax ones stay in the remaining melt (i.e. closer to the still-warm bases).

 

EDIT: if the 'prep' wax has additives like moly or graphite in it, I would expect the additives to move into the WotD less than any remaining soft-wax molecules do.

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

I'm not convinced that there is a 'blending' so much as a 'stratification and limited mixing'.     

 

Kinda like if you put brazil nuts and peanuts in a can, they're not going to uniformly self-distribute and average out to a can of cashews.

 

I think that the hard wax molecules will tend to harden soonest (air side) while the soft wax ones stay in the remaining melt (i.e. closer to the still-warm bases).

 

EDIT: if the 'prep' wax has additives like moly or graphite in it, I would expect the additives to move into the WotD less than any remaining soft-wax molecules do.

 

Edit: OK.  I was educated on how these things mix.

 

I asked this to Dom Tom, and undertood his answer to mean - adding a cold wax over a warm wax would give you a lower cold range wax or a colder range warm wax.  So if the cold range wax went to -10, when blended (depending on the percents) you might only be good to -5 or 0.

 

If you're an optomist, by adding a cold to warm you can get the lower end from +10 down to 0 (again depending on the percent of each blended).


Edited by L&AirC - 1/16/13 at 3:17pm
post #5 of 8

This is NUTS! But it’s all the same nuts…

 

Think of a soft wax as containing some very small peanuts, many small peanuts, and some medium peanuts; a medium wax as containing some small peanuts, many medium peanuts, and some large peanuts; a hard wax as containing some medium peanuts, many large peanuts, and some very large peanuts.

 

Mix any two or three and you get an average. When you add them to the base, it becomes a free-for-all with the smallest penetrating the deepest into the core and the largest staying near the surface.

 

So ... if you premix two waxes, when you iron them into the base the components will be absorbed at different speeds, the soft components go deeper and the harder stay closer to the surface. If you hold two bars together, rather than pre-mix, the results will be not the same but very similar. If you drip one first then the other, once again the result will be similar regardless of which one goes first. Premixing is just more predictable because all components are ironed in at the same temperature and for the same duration.

 

Hope I didn't add to the madness with my explanation!

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

Thanks.  I think I have some clarity now, though maybe I should listed this question under legumes. 

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by handhdad View Post

Thanks.  I think I have some clarity now, though maybe I should listed this question under legumes. 

George Washington Carver answers all legume questions and he hasn't posted in a while

post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

George Washington Carver answers all legume questions and he hasn't posted in a while

wink.gif

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