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Best Ski Town to LIVE IN - Page 9

post #241 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post
 

Some thoughts on mountain towns. 

 

The big mega resort towns have there downfalls. Yes, you can make money but if moving to the mountains in part was to escape the "rat race" it probably won't happen in one of these towns. The hour of powder is a real thing and it maybe a different form but it is indeed a rat race. 

 

Smaller areas or off the radar areas often have a much more laid back vibe, a slower pace, and in my opinion a better experience. The downfall is making money. 

 

I like a mid sized town. The Tellurides are too small and a place like Salt Lake is too big. Something in the middle can still have a small town vibe, the amenities of a larger city, and you can still stay off the grid, maybe make it out to get some groceries and not have to say hi to every other person that walks by. Basically you can have a more private life. Towns like here in Flagstaff, Santa Fe, Bend, or Bellingham fit this criteria. These towns are in the 50,000 to 100,000 population, offer jobs other than tourism gigs, and have a little more well rounded and diverse group of people. I really appreciate that as I get older. Being surrounded by mostly type A personalities and getting into the same conversation about the skiing that day get's really old to me. I like a town that is a ski town but it's not just a ski town. A place where you can get an education, hopefully a job, and not have to live paycheck to paycheck is something I look for now, this is a big contrast from my twenties where the only things that mattered to me where deep snows and steep terrain. 

 

I guess I'm not really a fan of huge fast paced ski areas any longer, I don't like to stress out about getting first tracks on my favorite lines and I don't want to work three dead end jobs to make the bills. 

So much truth in this (though I take issue with "and not have to say hi to every other person" which I personally consider a huge plus of small town living).

 

I ski bummed during college at Jackson Hole (80/81 -- Mr. Peabody's WayBack Machine, anybody?).  I still go back every year for the terrain and memories.  I went through a tough period of realizing that the "hour of powder" had become a sort of reality, but that I still wanted to ski there every year, even if it was in cut up crud (also, I kind of got over the need to ride the tram).

 

But other than that place, I'm with you in being done with the huge, crowded, fast-paced areas.  Luckily, there are enough uncrowded but fun smaller areas, and a few huge, uncrowded areas left!

post #242 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

http://www.tetongravity.com/story/ski/what-ski-town-should-you-move-to-this-season

A lot of these ring true.

Wait! sibhusky was reading TGR?!?

I never noticed this thread before, but reading through I notice a lot of posts mention Santa Fe. I've lived in Santa Fe for many years and I just want to caution people that it's culturally very "different" and not really for everybody. There's really no comparison to more mainstream places like Summit Cty or Tahoe. I'm not going to go on unless people ask for details, but I strongly recommend that anyone considering moving to northern New Mexico investigate closely and discuss it with long-term residents before committing.

I love it, but it really is the City Different.
post #243 of 255
No, it was linked to by someone else in my Facebook News feed... Don't ruin my rep.
post #244 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

No, it was linked to by someone else in my Facebook News feed... Don't ruin my rep.

Okay, actually glad to hear that. My world order was seriously threatened.
post #245 of 255

I have to say that Bend, Oregon is way high on my list of places to move to when I retire in about 3 years.  Certainly our first plan will be to go rent  and live there for a year and see ... actually the first plan is to get my hubby out there for a week ski trip.  He's never been and trusting my instincts, but I need him to experience it to get him completely on board.

 

Our alternative is stay in Cali and retire to the very great, small town of Big Bear.  I know the skiing basically sucks, but the cost of living is low and we already own some property outright.  We could ski safari every year.

post #246 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


Wait! sibhusky was reading TGR?!?

I never noticed this thread before, but reading through I notice a lot of posts mention Santa Fe. I've lived in Santa Fe for many years and I just want to caution people that it's culturally very "different" and not really for everybody. There's really no comparison to more mainstream places like Summit Cty or Tahoe. I'm not going to go on unless people ask for details, but I strongly recommend that anyone considering moving to northern New Mexico investigate closely and discuss it with long-term residents before committing.

I love it, but it really is the City Different.

Bob, just curious because I had an Aunt who lived in Santa Fe. She was very new agey, tarot card, astrology driven, etc. Sedonaesque. Is that the sort of different you're talking about? Just curious. Not planning on moving there. 

post #247 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maui Steve View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

I never noticed this thread before, but reading through I notice a lot of posts mention Santa Fe. I've lived in Santa Fe for many years and I just want to caution people that it's culturally very "different" and not really for everybody. There's really no comparison to more mainstream places like Summit Cty or Tahoe. I'm not going to go on unless people ask for details, but I strongly recommend that anyone considering moving to northern New Mexico investigate closely and discuss it with long-term residents before committing.

I love it, but it really is the City Different.
Bob, just curious because I had an Aunt who lived in Santa Fe. She was very new agey, tarot card, astrology driven, etc. Sedonaesque. Is that the sort of different you're talking about? Just curious. Not planning on moving there. 

That's like the most benign side of it. One way to describe it here is that the long history and general poverty of NM produces some significant cultural frictions. Those issues also make it sometimes not a particularly welcoming place. Of course, like anywhere, the more money you have, the easier it is to isolate yourself from things like that, but that's not really living somewhere. The politics here are pretty weird, with a touch of third world. The history of the United States is just a small part of the overall history here. Indian history goes back thousands of years, Spanish history goes backover 400 years, and the strength of those influences can be a bit of a surprise to the sort of people that are looking for "the best ski town."
post #248 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


That's like the most benign side of it. One way to describe it here is that the long history and general poverty of NM produces some significant cultural frictions. Those issues also make it sometimes not a particularly welcoming place. Of course, like anywhere, the more money you have, the easier it is to isolate yourself from things like that, but that's not really living somewhere. The politics here are pretty weird, with a touch of third world. The history of the United States is just a small part of the overall history here. Indian history goes back thousands of years, Spanish history goes backover 400 years, and the strength of those influences can be a bit of a surprise to the sort of people that are looking for "the best ski town."

Sounds like Hawaii. LOL   

post #249 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maui Steve View Post

Sounds like Hawaii. LOL   
In a strange way, I think so...
post #250 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


That's like the most benign side of it. One way to describe it here is that the long history and general poverty of NM produces some significant cultural frictions. Those issues also make it sometimes not a particularly welcoming place. Of course, like anywhere, the more money you have, the easier it is to isolate yourself from things like that, but that's not really living somewhere. The politics here are pretty weird, with a touch of third world. The history of the United States is just a small part of the overall history here. Indian history goes back thousands of years, Spanish history goes backover 400 years, and the strength of those influences can be a bit of a surprise to the sort of people that are looking for "the best ski town."

 

^^^This. Lived in Santa Fe for 18 years. Santa Fe and northern New Mexico in general is very different culturally from almost anywhere else in the US. There were many things I loved about Santa Fe but the culture, racial issues and politics are very weird.

post #251 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post


I never noticed this thread before, but reading through I notice a lot of posts mention Santa Fe. I've lived in Santa Fe for many years and I just want to caution people that it's culturally very "different" and not really for everybody. There's really no comparison to more mainstream places like Summit Cty or Tahoe. I'm not going to go on unless people ask for details, but I strongly recommend that anyone considering moving to northern New Mexico investigate closely and discuss it with long-term residents before committing.

I love it, but it really is the City Different.

 

Northern NM is a indeed a strange, strange land.

post #252 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJB View Post
 

 

Northern NM is a indeed a strange, strange land.

 

While I fully realize living North of the border in the Durango area is not the same thing at all, I can say that living down here really opened my eyes to dynamics that I really didn't understand before...

 

 

Let's just say if I was a Native American, I can't imagine being anything other than pretty pissed off at a LOT of people. I think we tend to think that all the despicable things that Europeans did towards Native Americans ended a long time in the past...

 

Moving to someplace adjacent to the reservations and to someplace where stories that never make it to national press get reported, you can only shake your head and realize that the situation is pretty fucked in a lot of ways, there are still some policies that seem overtly racist, tons of instances where things carry at least a latent amount of racism, and then tons of other instances where individuals are exploiting the situation to do best by themselves.

 

People exposed to this stuff respond in ways that are probably not productive, and then other people who don't believe racism exists any more respond in further unproductive ways. And this is in the Durango/Southern Ute area, where the economic aspect plays much less of a role.

 

So yeah, I don't really know what I am talking about, but I have been exposed to enough to have some inkling of what I don't know.

post #253 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post
 

 

While I fully realize living North of the border in the Durango area is not the same thing at all, I can say that living down here really opened my eyes to dynamics that I really didn't understand before...

 

 

Let's just say if I was a Native American, I can't imagine being anything other than pretty pissed off at a LOT of people. I think we tend to think that all the despicable things that Europeans did towards Native Americans ended a long time in the past...

 

Moving to someplace adjacent to the reservations and to someplace where stories that never make it to national press get reported, you can only shake your head and realize that the situation is pretty fucked in a lot of ways, there are still some policies that seem overtly racist, tons of instances where things carry at least a latent amount of racism, and then tons of other instances where individuals are exploiting the situation to do best by themselves.

 

People exposed to this stuff respond in ways that are probably not productive, and then other people who don't believe racism exists any more respond in further unproductive ways. And this is in the Durango/Southern Ute area, where the economic aspect plays much less of a role.

 

So yeah, I don't really know what I am talking about, but I have been exposed to enough to have some inkling of what I don't know.

 

It is pretty incredible the racism in NM is bad. The Native Americans just don't have the national support structures or the public awareness that other minority groups do. Then you throw in the crime, general destitution, and abusive police force (at least in Abq). NM has a pretty dark side that you don't really pick up on until you've been here a few years.  


Edited by lonewolf210 - 11/18/14 at 2:19pm
post #254 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlueDevil63 View Post
 

 

^^^This. Lived in Santa Fe for 18 years. Santa Fe and northern New Mexico in general is very different culturally from almost anywhere else in the US. There were many things I loved about Santa Fe but the culture, racial issues and politics are very weird.

New Mexico is so strange. It's almost what makes it really cool in a way and interesting but it sort of sucks a lot too. It has a modern wild wild west feel, more so than anywhere I have ever been. It's got some seriously sketchy gangster sh#t going on. 

 

I spent almost two weeks staying in and working near Gallup once. It was the most eerie places I have ever been. We watched a little of the Albuquerque news at our hotel, it made It look worse than Gallup. 

post #255 of 255
Quote:
Originally Posted by lonewolf210 View Post
 

 

It is pretty incredible the racism in NM is bad. The Native Americans just don't have the national support structures or the public awareness that other minority groups do. Then you throw in the crime, general destitution, and abusive police force (at least in Abq). NM has a pretty dark side that you don't really pick up on until you've been here a few years.  

 

And it is racism in every direction. When I first moved there 25 years ago it was the first place where I really felt racism. It was "Anglo go home" and nasty looks in stores and people speaking Spanish and acting like I was some kind of idiot because I didn't speak Spanish. Then there is the racism from and towards native Americans. And then the racism of the old guard hispanics towards the new immigrants (it was not uncommon for Mexican immigrant kids to get brutally picked on in school by the old Spanish family kids). Then as Santa Fe became more upscale and less funky you had good old fashioned white racism against hispanic and native Americans. Then you had the whole hatred towards non-locals (and you weren't a local unless your family had been there for 300+ years).  Then the land ownership and water rights grievances. Just really hard to navigate all the animosity.

 

Beautiful, beautiful place physically but not quite so beautiful in other ways. Sorry if I am knocking northern NM. I lived there forever so clearly it can't be all bad (and Ski Santa Fe and Taos are great) but man is it a weird place. Whenever people talk about how weird Utah is I just mention that they should try out northern NM or southern Alabama (another place I have lived) if they think Utah is the only weird place in the US.

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