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Hard Shutter When Stopping

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

This shutter is wearing on my confidence and burning my quads.

 

I'm  29  5'11 about 225 lbs. I've been skiing for about 20 years and would consider myself advanced. I skied mostly blacks and double blacks in college, and have had back surgery since, so I've slowed down to blues and blacks.

 

I'm skiing on Atomic Beta Carv 8.18 180's.

 

My boots (which I'm told may be the problem) are Nordica T 5.1 size 28.0. I wear a 10.5 shoe. The boots seem to be letting my foot slide around a little much. My toes slam forward when landing a jump. The boot issue was brought up by a salesman, and i didn't know how much too trust whether or not he was trying to sell me new boots or not. I tried on a pair of Head NextEdge 80 's size 27.0, which seemed to fit firm and comfortable.

 

Anyway, if you need more info, please feel free to ask. That's all I can think of...sorry, it's a lot to read, I know. Any help would be great!

 

Thanks guys!

 

Texan in Pennsylvania

post #2 of 16

Welcome to Epic.Besides the boots, I suspect that you are skiing beyond the level of the ski and are likely overpowering it, hence the shutter (it is trying to correct a mistake that is not actually happening). Ability (and wt wink.gif) increases the performance requirements of the equipment.

 

Consider looking at an advance/expert ski in this category, demo if possible and see if that makes a difference.

 

I would also consider stiffer boots.

 

Both the skis and boots (new and old) are intermediate level. Based on your ability and wt you should be selecting higher performance equipment, you'll likely see an improvement in your skiing once you adjust to it.

 

See a good ski shop for advice and selection, along with good boot fitting.

 

Good luck.

post #3 of 16

I'm thinking it's not gear, rather technique. You are leaning into (up) the hill on your hockey stops. You have to keep your weight down the hill, over your skis, with upper body separation. Otherwise the ski, not weighted enough to hold, will chatter. 

(I have some of the stiffest, heaviest skis made and they will chatter if not weighted correctly. )

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I'm thinking it's not gear, rather technique. You are leaning into (up) the hill on your hockey stops. You have to keep your weight down the hill, over your skis, with upper body separation. Otherwise the ski, not weighted enough to hold, will chatter. 

(I have some of the stiffest, heaviest skis made and they will chatter if not weighted correctly. )

+1

99% of my "gear" issues over the years have been technique.

post #5 of 16

davluri and vsirin,

 

My reasoning for gear was based on the comment's on slope selection and self rated ability selection along with the wt.  I looked up the equipment and it is rated for intermediate skiers. 

 

While proper technique is very important the balance of the performance is based on the equipment used, which can both help or hinder the the progression.

 

Consider that he is skiing in a very soft boot and still looking at an intermediate boot (and just reading that it was brought out by salesman, not a boot fitter makes me suspect a sports store, not ski shop).  Advanced skier in an intermediate 80 flex boot at 225lbs is a little off on my scale of things (I would have expected at least 100-110 flex based on wt alone at this level.   

 

Therefore assuming proper technique, it would be the equipment at fault and is letting off when it should be holding which in turn caused errors in technique.  Hard judgment by reading the just information provided.

 

Hence demo if possible, and more importantly see a good ski shop to discuss and receive advice as to what Texan in PA should be actually looking for.

 

Respectfully,

 

G

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

davluri and vsirin,

 

My reasoning for gear was based on the comment's on slope selection and self rated ability selection along with the wt.  I looked up the equipment and it is rated for intermediate skiers. 

 

While proper technique is very important the balance of the performance is based on the equipment used, which can both help or hinder the the progression.

 

Consider that he is skiing in a very soft boot and still looking at an intermediate boot (and just reading that it was brought out by salesman, not a boot fitter makes me suspect a sports store, not ski shop).  Advanced skier in an intermediate 80 flex boot at 225lbs is a little off on my scale of things (I would have expected at least 100-110 flex based on wt alone at this level.   

 

Therefore assuming proper technique, it would be the equipment at fault and is letting off when it should be holding which in turn caused errors in technique.  Hard judgment by reading the just information provided.

 

Hence demo if possible, and more importantly see a good ski shop to discuss and receive advice as to what Texan in PA should be actually looking for.

 

Respectfully,

 

G


Absolutely agree. The OP's gear is not right for him as he described himself. Just from my personal experience, I've learned to look at technique first. One of the reasons being I can fix technique flaws for free. (that is now that I've invested many thousands in lessons and clinics I can call upon from my memory bank and notebooks). I expect the OP may have issues in both areas.

post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post


Absolutely agree. The OP's gear is not right for him as he described himself. Just from my personal experience, I've learned to look at technique first. One of the reasons being I can fix technique flaws for free. (that is now that I've invested many thousands in lessons and clinics I can call upon from my memory bank and notebooks). I expect the OP may have issues in both areas.

Agreed. In that case you gotta unfortunately bite the bullet and lay down a bit of money for the correct equipment and then improve the technical issues.

 

One of my current beefs is the extensive selection of equipment out there today.  Too many levels.  Max out the beginner level, skip the intermediate, start at or near the bottom end of the advanced/expert.  If you are keen enough the progression will be in jumps when done this way.

 

At first it will be technique limits equipment, followed by (as improvement occurs) equipment limits technique...jump level...and repeat, until you reach that stage where you hit the balance point where the equipment doesn't limit you and you can't max it out (Luckily I'm there right now biggrin.gif still trying to go up higher and as I age not looking forward to the downwards slope of this progression eek.gif when ever it occurs when I (the human part) start to limit both the equipment and technique).

 

Mind you, these are different levels for different skiers.

 

G

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texan in PA View Post

This shutter is wearing on my confidence and burning my quads.

 

I'm  29  5'11 about 225 lbs. I've been skiing for about 20 years and would consider myself advanced. I skied mostly blacks and double blacks in college, and have had back surgery since, so I've slowed down to blues and blacks.

 

I'm skiing on Atomic Beta Carv 8.18 180's.

 

My boots (which I'm told may be the problem) are Nordica T 5.1 size 28.0. I wear a 10.5 shoe. The boots seem to be letting my foot slide around a little much. My toes slam forward when landing a jump. The boot issue was brought up by a salesman, and i didn't know how much too trust whether or not he was trying to sell me new boots or not. I tried on a pair of Head NextEdge 80 's size 27.0, which seemed to fit firm and comfortable.

 

Anyway, if you need more info, please feel free to ask. That's all I can think of...sorry, it's a lot to read, I know. Any help would be great!

 

Thanks guys!

 

Texan in Pennsylvania

Lots of good advice. I will say though that for jumps you are going to slam your toes if you land ack see pretty much no matter what boot you are wearing 

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, lots of good advice here.

 

It's certainly possible that I've picked up bad habits over the years, since the last lesson I took was in '91. I could see that I'm probably compensating for my bum back, maybe? I don't even know if that makes sense. I was probably 190 lbs when I bought the skis, but I was certainly a more aggressive skier back then. Should I rent skis but not boots, or boots but not skis, or rent both next time to see if the problem gets any better?

 

Again, thanks a lot guys.

post #10 of 16
Have you had your skis tuned by someone else recently? The only time I have consistent chatter is when I skied with 0 base bevel (not recommended lol).
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

Have you had your skis tuned by someone else recently? The only time I have consistent chatter is when I skied with 0 base bevel (not recommended lol).

Yeah, and when I went to make sure it was all tuned correctly, both ski shops that I took my setup too said the tune was fine. One of those ski shops told me they had no idea how to fix the shutter, other than buying harder gear, of course. The other was the guy that I felt a little pressure to buy a boot from...but both said the skis where in good shape and setup correctly. 

post #12 of 16
Shudder. Sorry, but the third time was the limit. A shutter is what you have in your camera or on the outside of your house. Unless I'm REALLY not following the subject, in which case my apologies.
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Shudder. Sorry, but the third time was the limit. A shutter is what you have in your camera or on the outside of your house. Unless I'm REALLY not following the subject, in which case my apologies.

Sorry, I'm using my cell phone which uses auto correct, but i'll be sure to email HTC and let them know of your concerns. Thanks for the input. 

post #14 of 16

You can spend $700 on new skis and not lose the shudder.

You can spend $400 with an instructor and shudder is gone. But you still have the crappy skis. th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #15 of 16

maybe the skkkkkkkis have a stutter?

post #16 of 16

No matter what it sounds like the OP needs new boots.  If he wears a 28 and a 27 fit comfortably than, brother, get thee to an excellent bootfitter.  Spend as much $ as you're comfortable with.  If you wanna ski then the boots gotta fit. 

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