or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Too much pizza? Feedback requested on a video clip of my skiing
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Too much pizza? Feedback requested on a video clip of my skiing

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I made a short youtube clip of some of my skiing from tonight.  I am the guy in a yellow jacket with black/purple skis with a white diamond logo.  It's a mix of POV from my helmet and a few shots taken by my partner from her helmet.  I'd be interested in any and all feedback.
http://youtu.be/LrL8qy3HVC4

 



In particular:
Is my stance too wide?
Are my skis not parallel enough?

A few notes:
- This is my second season skiing.  I have taken some lessons and will be taking some more lessons next month.
- Conditions were fairly icy.  I was not using the best skis for the conditions.  These are the Black Diamond Drift skis.  They are light and fairly soft backcountry skis that work well in powder.  Dimensions are 136-100-122 and 176 cm.

Thanks in advance for any comments, criticisms and suggestions.

 

P.S.  I realize this may come up so I will address it now.  At 1:10, I do ski fairly close to my partner.  We basically had the hill to ourselves and we had planned the shot ahead of time so I knew she was watching me and would not move.  It would still be fair to say that I should have given more room.

post #2 of 11

Hi Steve, 

 

Good on you for posting video footage! Right now you're skiing a series of high speed linked brakes, but not actually turning. Keep it safe--slow it down, and work on your turns. You may need to reframe how you think about turning; rather than thinking of turns as a way to dump speed, think of turns as a way to maintain your speed. 

 

As you ski the mountain, think about rounded C-shaped turns with minimal skidding. Once you can link turns in control at a low speed, gradually begin picking up the pace--but do so by adjusting your turn shape. As you develop your ability to create turns, more of the mountain will open up to you.

 

As an exercise to self-assess, try some pivot slips on a blue run, with the goal of maintaining a slow speed. If you start to accelerate, you're not turning. Don't bother trying to correct your pivot slips mid-run; simply stop and start over. Pivot slips are easiest on firm snow. 

 

Sounds like you already recognize there are far better skis for icy conditions. If you do switch to a ski with a narrower waist, it'll be a lot easier for you to engage the ski edge and create turn shape (in all groomed conditions).

 

I also feel you'd benefit from in-person feedback at this stage, rather than attempting a new exercise unguided. An instructor will give you immediate feedback, which is important to ensure you're practising the right things (and not ingraining undesirable muscle memory).

 

As for your original question, stance width needs to be functional for the terrain/conditions/intent. I'd revisit stance width and wedging once you're skiing at a moderate speed. 

 

Think turning!

post #3 of 11

Steve, good advice from Metaphor regarding shaping of turns. To do this you will have to work the front of the ski and in your present stance that is going to be difficult. The shadows of the video illustrate this well. You are not using your ankles at all, basically just using knee and back joints. Try to stand up taller and either pull the feet back under your butt or bring your hips/butt forward over your feet. Your quad muscles will appreciate this. With a more forward or upright neutral stance you can use the front of the ski with tipping and turning movements of the legs to get the skis to track and turn into the nice "C" shapes instead of the skidded "Z" shape you now use. You also might need to have the boots looked at to see if they are a good fit for you.

post #4 of 11
The little "V" you see at the beginnings of turns results from starting your turns with a move to the new outside foot followed by an effort to match the skis. The steering and patience in turns needed to make the "C" roundness instead of the "Z" turn shapes mentioned above should begin with equal pressure on the bottoms of your feet and progressive increasing of the pressure on the new outside foot as the turn continues.
post #5 of 11

My first suggestion would be, to go and pick easier run, where you get less speed. Don't get me wrong, but this is not skiing... it's just sliding down, trying to stay alive, with much to high speed for your knowledge. Start on easier runs, where you don't pick up speed that easy, and try to get nice turn there fist, and only later on move to more difficult tracks.

Personally, I don't see point in sliding down WC course, when you can make nice turns on easy blue run. It's much more fun carve perfectly on easy run, then fight for life, sliding down half of the hill on single "turn" on steep and icy black run.

post #6 of 11

I will make just one comment here:  a 100mm wide ski is doing you absolutely no favors at this point your development.  A lot of modern ski technique is learning to roll on and off your ski edges and letting the design of the ski do what it's supposed to do (which is "turn for you").  The wider your ski, the harder it is to do that.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks for this advice.   This happened to be the first night where I had the camera on the groomers and it was also the iciest night of the season so far.  I knew that I was doing more fighting than skiing and so I figured that I would get some pointers for areas of improvement.

 

Here is a video from last week (POV from my helmet) that is a complete opposite.

- Backcountry instead of groomers

- Powder instead of ice

- Day instead of night

- Very tight trees instead of open slopes

- Slow instead of fast

- And a bit of music as a bonus

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=co_YkPPNnHo


 

post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

I will make just one comment here:  a 100mm wide ski is doing you absolutely no favors at this point your development.  A lot of modern ski technique is learning to roll on and off your ski edges and letting the design of the ski do what it's supposed to do (which is "turn for you").  The wider your ski, the harder it is to do that.

 

IMHO, the width isn't much of an issue. There are some very basic stance and balance issues that need to be revisited. Lot's of 'backseat' and 'in', little or no upper and lower body separation, etc....  I'd love to see his boot set up and fit as well. Honestly, at this level, the OP's going to be riding with lower edge angles on whatever ski he's on which isn't a bad thing at all.

 

OP, seriously, what you need at the very least is to invest in a group multiweek series of lessons to sort some of this out before you create habits that will take years to undo unless you don't mind being forever limited by lack of technique. You're having fun though, and that counts for much. Find the balance of coaching vs. just sliding around that you need and go from there. smile.gif

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve2222 View Post

In particular:
Is my stance too wide?
Are my skis not parallel enough?
 

Greetings Steve!

 

Your stance and parallel skis are ok, especially for this being only your second season. Metaphor has astutely observed that you are a "Z" turner. There are many reasons why skiers make "Z" turns. The primary ones are that they work and they are easy to do. If you ski in powder on rockered skis, there is another great reason: you'll make a lot of more experienced skiers roll their eyes as you (or they) ski by. You don't need to change if you are having fun.

 

Changing from a "Z" turner to a "C" turner is not easy. Why would you want to do this? "C" turning gives you more precise control over speed and direction with less physical effort. Most people find that the body sensations of "G" force from turning and the storing of energy into the skis and release of that energy back into the body are much more pleasurable when "C" turning. "C" turning also opens up more of the mountain that you can safely explore.

 

If you want to become a "C" turner. the first thing is that you will need to do is to change from defensive skiing (starting a turn for the purpose of slowing down) to offensive skiing (starting a turn to speed up). The bad news is that this means you have to change a lot to get from here to there. The good news is that there many paths that can get you there. Much of the advice above can get you there. An instructor can work with you in real time to determine the fastest way to get you there (note that different instructors could give you different plans). This could take some work. It's probably going to involve a few steps backward to start with. I typically start with static drills (e.g. tug of war) to introduce new stance positions and balancing movements and then do a series of carved uphill traverses.

post #10 of 11

I think Metaphor is spot on with the Z turns...here is how to improve to a C.

 

If you watch your video, you will notice your turns are intiated with an aburpt "up/down" movement (ie you quickly extend your legs, then quickly let them flex) this quick up down, is followed by a long "sit" where you just kinda skid sideways. 

 

To improve, just slow this all down:  Extend your ankles, knees and hips progressivley as you go through the transition...then stay tall, dont rush, and feel the skis under you as you continue towards the fall line...then begin to gradually flex your knees, ankles and hips as you complete the turn...repeat.

 

Our skis are only turning if we are flexing or extending on them...stop moving, and the skis stop turning....you can litterally see that in the video...you get stuck sitting back, and the skis just skid sidways.  Move progressivley, and gradually, and the skis will do the same.

post #11 of 11

Some good advice here. 

 

Right now, you are skidding/braking.  

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=LrL8qy3HVC4#t=47s

 

 

You are just getting started so slow down and work on your technique.  Picture the ski edge.  Imagine it slicing through the snow/ice.  That should be your target.

 

How to get there:

 

1.  Find your balance

2.  Ski on one ski

3.  Flex and roll your ankles/knees

4.  Work the edges of your skis

 

Once you start to feel this, you'll be much better able to handle the firm conditions in your first vid.

 

May I humbly suggest a lesson with an instructor?

 

-D

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Too much pizza? Feedback requested on a video clip of my skiing