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How do bootfitters increase ramp angle inside the boot?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

When I compared my Redster seppas (pc of plastic at the bottom of the boot under the liner) to the ones in my old Dalbello Scorpions I found out that there is a 10mm difference. So I took a pc of foam and stuck it under the Redsters seppa. Compressed it gave it a 5mm raise. To my surprice it did not mess up the fitting of the boot. It actually gave it a better fit. More snugg. So, what is the best way of increasing the ramp angle? Especially on the Redster since it has a funcky seppa. Do I stick something under the seppa and forget to attach it to the base of the boot or do I try to build something on the top of the seppa? And how do I do that? Note that if I raise the seppa then I need to go wider as well.... Why does the seppa need to be screwed to the base of the boot?

 

The reason I want to increase the angle is to give it a tighter fit. And to go a bit higher under the heel for better leveradge.

post #2 of 10

Zeppa?

 

heel wedges will raise the heel

 

do you have low volume feet? or limited range of dorsiflexion?

 

tilting the foot downward at the front will move your center of balance/mass forward over the boot?  might be good---might not?

 

mike

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your input. I think that my instep is quite low. I measure it to be 80mm. My dorsiflexion is normal. I bought 2mm thick rubber and cut two pcs of different length to go under my heels (overall thickness 4mm). It gives my foot a much snugger fit and my stance feels much more natural. Its not a prefect solutin since the rubber is on top of the zeppa in two layers. The surface should probably be smooth insted of having steps.

post #4 of 10

do you have custom insoles?

 

mike

post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

I have a bunch of insoles. I have narrowed it down to 3. A pair that were heat shaped to my feet back in 1989. They are hard but with a great supprotive shape. They have a very high arch. A pair of soft foam insoles that were made in 2011. They also have a high arch. They are carved from a pc of light red foam type material. A pair of insoles that were heat shaped to my foot a week ago. They have heating elements at the toes. They are quite thin and dont support the arch very well.

 

I had the 4mm raise under the heel today. The original linear felt very loose so its clear that I will continue to experiment with the old Head foam linear. From skiing today I learned that the combination of the foam linear and first two insoles gave me severe cramps under the arch of my foot. My feet also got very cold. They fit snugg but toes get cold and my foot under the arch cramps. But with the heat element insole I felt quite comfortable. The problem was that I did not want to cut a hole in the foam linear before Im 100% sertain that it will work so I skied today with the flat cable on the inside of the boot. It was ok for testing.

 

My conclusion is that I need to somehow make a 4mm raise under the liner and stick to a lower arch thinner insole, like the one I have with the heat element. Is this correct?

post #6 of 10

your heel lift should be a wedge tapering from heel to ball of foot in a flat plane, it sounds as though you are using a block under your heels----this will cause the insole to bend mid foot up into the arch of the foot.  

 

mike

post #7 of 10

There are many reasons to increase ramp angle, but I'd say tightening  boot fit isn't one of them.  Increasing ramp angle dramatically affects stance, ability to balance and muscle activation and while it may also affect fit you evidently are after fit alteration only.  I'd try a pad on the tongue instep and not mess with ramp angle.

 

Lou

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 

I was thinking that increasing ramp would lower the boot volume but increasing ramp inside the Redster turned out to be really difficult. Dallbello provided two different foot boards (zeppas), one higher, one lower. They were easy to switch but on the Atomics its a completely different ball game. The way the boot is shaped inside makes it nearly impossible.

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by miketsc View Post

your heel lift should be a wedge tapering from heel to ball of foot in a flat plane, it sounds as though you are using a block under your heels----this will cause the insole to bend mid foot up into the arch of the foot.  

 

mike

 

Yes, it should be a wedge. The block method is not really working that well. You can feel the edge even if its only 2mm...

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

Hi, Im bumping this thread because of the update on the zeppas (boot board) for the Redster. Atomic came out with a 4mm raised one. I did not get a size that fits me but it looks like others have been experiancing the same problems I have been. And following in Dallbellos footsteps :).

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