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Ski damage - need help from you detectives to figure out the mechanics

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Hi - I am here to ask you folks to help me figure out what could have caused the damage to my son's GS ski (pictures attached).  I am completely baffled - doesn't look like it happened while skiing or during the transport.

 

Timeline :  

Night before - Skis were inspected the night before and nothing stood out. (Either of us would have certainly noticed such a bad damage.  He put the spacers on to save time in the morning.)

 

Morning of training day - Skis were put on the back of the wagon with the seat down, along with two other pairs (all had spacers)

 

Morning training - My son did a 1/2 day of training on the GS pair.  He didn't have any other pair so there was no switching to a different pair.  He said he never took them off during the training on the snow, other than coming in for a break mid-morning.  He used the ski check for the break.  Snow condition was one of the best of the season, not a lot of debris on a partially cloudy day.  Temp in the low to high 20's Farenheit during the training.

 

After training - He put the spacers back on at the end of training and went home.  I don't think he was looking or checking at the bases carefully while putting the skis together.  All skis, in spacers, went to the roof top box for the ride home.  While wiping down the skis at home, he noticed the deep gouge in the picture, only on one ski.  No matching damage to the other ski, not even a scratch.  

 

My son was pretty upset about it, especially with an upcoming race.  He doesn't abuse his skis - especially his race skis - doesn't like using them when the condition is bad, certainly wouldn't go to the park with them.  I was pretty baffled and upset myself, but told him it could be fixed with the p-tex at the shop (let me know if you think otherwise) and downplayed the incident.  The skis are 175GS, the damage is a little more than a foot from the tip, not quite a half way to the front part of the bindings.

 

For one thing, I'm just very curious how this could have happened.  And obviously, I want to understand so it doesn't happen again.

 

What do you guys see?  What possible scenario(s) could explain this?

 

1000

 

1000

post #2 of 14

He did run over something, you see the rub mark above the damage.  I would suspect that he may have hit something in the snow and not even realized it or seen it for that matter.

 

As to what it was its hard to guess.

 

I think he got lucky that it didn't cause more damage than it did.

post #3 of 14

Looks almost like a sideways gash, like the ding happened while sideslipping.  Easily fixed.

post #4 of 14

I'm siding with oldschool in saying that he probably hit something that was in the snow, which is pretty unavoidable considering racers aren't looking at their feet when they are skiing. 

post #5 of 14

That doesn't look like a ding that was picked up while skiing to me.  There is no lead in or follow through scratching that would indicate pressure on the ski as it slid over the offending object.  It looks like it took a hit from something that came at it from "below" and bounced back out, or like the ski smacked on something while being transported or stored.  It was obviously made by a blow that went from side to side, not in the direction the ski would be moving while being used.  I can't ever remember seeing a ding like that, especially that was created while skiing.  Thank goodness it's an easy fix.

post #6 of 14
Whatever it was was fairly sharp as it effectively removed all the base without leaving 'hangers'. Could have been a nail in the lift's top or bottom structure, maybe a piece of gate someone left in the snow after it was broken. I don't think it was done at speed as it would be longer. A nuisance, but not a real problem. A good base weld will take care of it and not affect performance of the ski.
post #7 of 14

Used to see digs like that appear on old school loading ramps on chairs.  Mid-way ramps often had elevated stations you would often side step up in early season that had 1X2 screwed in to help hold snow.  If a screw worked up and you stepped on it, you could get one of those.  Any carpeted areas in your lift lines or loading areas?

post #8 of 14

This looks like it is Yeti-caused.  I believe your son had a run in with a Yeti and possibly ran over one of his claws that was protruding from the snow because Yetis like to sleep in soft ungroomed powder where they trap gapers.  Your son is lucky to be alive. 

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

My understanding of the 'physics' of it is closest to Posaune, but couldn't have happened during the transport under my watchful eyes.  Not impossible, just very unlikely and there was no opportunity for a direct hit like that at that angle, not the way the skis were put together with spacers.

 

Looking at the impact, it doesn't look possible while skiing, side slipping or not, unless he took a jump and landed almost sideways.  The gouge is too sharp, too direct at a sharp angle.  I don't believe there is any rug at the lift, on or off.  Even if there was, I doubt that a protruding blunt nail could make a damage almost sideways like that, to clear out entire base material.  The gouge wasn't directly under the boot either.

 

Actually... now that I think of it, he did mention one of his friends getting a lot of air during the gateless training - need to ask if he ever got air during the training.

 

I'm impressed that no one jumped to the conspiracy theory I was about to call - flip the ski base side up while he wasn't around and jab it with the tip of pole.  With a bit of twisting wrist motion, that could explain the symmetry in the midst of side action at a sharp angle.  Done by a right hander, or a left hander if the ski was upside down.  A love triangle, perhaps.  Or... maybe I've been watching too many crime shows on TV.  This theory would actually put core2 fairly close to the perp.

 

Only if I put this much effort into my work...

post #10 of 14

The entry side of the gouge (the right side in the above photo) looks like a pole tip to me.  Did your son leave his skis upside down on the snow in prep for the race?  If so it would be easy for someone to stab a base with the tip of a pole (hopefully accidentally) as they skated past.  That little gouge would be easy to miss as your son flipped his skis over to mount up for the race.

post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sinbad7 View Post

The entry side of the gouge (the right side in the above photo) looks like a pole tip to me.  Did your son leave his skis upside down on the snow in prep for the race?  If so it would be easy for someone to stab a base with the tip of a pole (hopefully accidentally) as they skated past.  That little gouge would be easy to miss as your son flipped his skis over to mount up for the race.

^^^THIS looks very plausible. 

 

 

Quote:

 

Morning training - My son did a 1/2 day of training on the GS pair.  He didn't have any other pair so there was no switching to a different pair.  He said he never took them off during the training on the snow, other than coming in for a break mid-morning.  He used the ski check for the break.  Snow condition was one of the best of the season, not a lot of debris on a partially cloudy day.  Temp in the low to high 20's Farenheit during the training.

Perhaps they were knocked over or stood up against a piece of wood with a nail or screw protruding by the ski check kid.  It happens.

 

+1 to the damage being completely repairable.  That should fill easily and hold well if done properly.  Even as is that wouldn't really affect race times.  We don't spend any time on the middle of the skis these days.  A gouge near the edge would be much more annoying.

post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

This looks like it is Yeti-caused.  I believe your son had a run in with a Yeti and possibly ran over one of his claws that was protruding from the snow because Yetis like to sleep in soft ungroomed powder where they trap gapers.  Your son is lucky to be alive. 


most plausible theory at this point by far. but I speculate he pissed him off so the Yeti bit his ski. That is the characteristic bite mark.

post #13 of 14

bounced off the toe-piece of the other ski during a bad transition?

post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

bounced off the toe-piece of the other ski during a bad transition?

This is actually the most plausible so far (although the yeti one is right up there). If you look at the damage, there are scratch lines you can see on left side of the crater that suggest vertical movement, and the pooled material suggests entry from bottom, shave off most of the plastic while leaving some pooled on top. The several horizontal lines are probably from whatever gouged the base chatter against ptex. The object that cause this seems to be too wide/flat to be a pole tip.
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