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Demo Day @ Seven Springs, PA- 01/05/13 - Page 2

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

... they were losing to Fischer Mavens and Big Stix.    I lay the blame on Look's decidedly UN-flat demo bindings.  

Curious if you heard anything else about the Big Stix, or had a chance to try them. 

post #32 of 34
Jim, here's your entire quote. I'll just annotate to, ah, clarify your clarifications: 
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

 

Allow me to clarify a little further. This is absolutely my own least favorite of the 98mm skis that we currently sell (which is a lot). Why?.............OK..............one more time.

 

When you picture what a 98mm ski should be good at, you picture the vast expanse of terrain in the west. OK, I notice you used a period, which ends a thought according to Ms. Bivens so I'll stand by my comment that you're assuming the Mantra is about skiing in the west. The next lines are about conditions, not place. It snowed yesterday or the day before, the wind is blowing, and it's cold. You aren't in the first or second hundred to hit that bowl that starts above the treeline This also nails down place, since we have very little above treeline back east, and the trees are anything but sparse. but pretty quickly dips into sparse trees and then drops into some rock bands before leveling out on the groomers to head back to the lift. That's what we ski out here.....most of the time. Only if you're sidebounds; when I think of Squaw I also think of places like Siberia or Headwall that have lots of ice that can transition into deep crud in a hurry, or KT with a zillion bumps that can combine mank and scratch. The snow there is soft-firm-chalky-bumpy-soft-deep-firm soft-starting to bump..........all in one run. OK, here's the problem with your story: Back here we use Mantras for ice or scratch with clumps of heavy crud over it. Or slush and mank days. We don't necessarily hit the trees, unless they're fairly open (normal by your standards), and we don't use them for powder. For powder we use wider skis. We like them on bigger clumpy bumps that are linked by ice. So you're talking western apples and I'm talking eastern oranges. Mantras are a superb heavy crud ski. Which we get tons and tons of. The thing that makes a ski work here for the majority of good skiers is flex because the flex (the bend) is what turns you. If the ski doesn't bend well, then it doesn't turn well and then you have to turn the ski instead of letting the ski turn you. Yes, but you leave out the rest of the physics: Edge angles and pressures. Most skiers who cannot bend a stiffer ski do not know how to or do not want to be bothered to achieve the edge angles needed to send most of the force into the ski, rather than into the snow below it. It becomes a plank if you're mostly just pressing it into the even more plank-like surface of the planet. I generally don't want a noodle in this stuff but I don't want a plank either. The Mantra in it's most recent incarnations is a plank hence my personal preference for other skis like the Bone and the Enforcer. Do a lot of skiers ski the Mantra? sure. A lot of skiers like K2 Rictors and Recons too. Neither are my own personal preferences within their respective categories. Nevertheless, I believe that my commentary on all these skis is properly reflective of my opinions of them and  I don't hesitate to suggest them when the end user seems appropriate to me.

 

Hmm. If you reread Phil's initial comment, and then your elaboration of how you feel about the Mantra, it goes waaaay beyond suggesting a particular ski for a particular poster. You both create a narrative about just how bad a ski the Mantra is, Phil of course being point man, and you both constantly bring up some alternatives from Nordica. So that makes me curious. And I think, hmmm. Small business. Seasonal. Cherry picked products. I know a few things about small businesses that have dramatic seasonal fluctuations. Big issue is where does early cash flow come from after all the inventory has been purchased? Summer sales help, but what's needed is a superproduct (Bonafide) with predictions of looming sell outs. Hot! Get It Now! Along with specialized products that are early and steady - that would be racing stuff - and then what to do with rest of the inventory, particularly Nordies and Dynastars, which may require a different marketing narrative because they don't move as easily. So do a poll with strategically chosen skis to create some conversation, periodically bring up what great skis these slower movers are, then match them up against a straw man - Mantras - which in fact will sell no matter what's said on Epic; one of those brands you have to carry because customers want it, even if you honesty don't think it's the best choice. (As you said.) Bingo, a new narrative about how unsung wonderful skis the Nordies and Dynastars are, compared to these terrible Mantras, and oh yeah, watch out for shortages of the Enforcers. And of course there are the other reliable products with large supplies back in the warehouses, like the E88 and 98 and K2's (and uh, Mantras), that also pretty much sell themselves, lot of word of mouth or demoing chances, so they can be downplayed online, they keep things rolling along. Works for skis, cars, you name it. And the beauty is that these are all good products, you're being honest in your basic inventory choices, not like you're pushing shoddy stuff. 

 

So not saying this is how it is, but am saying that the way you talk about skis on Epic has changed in the last few years, and it now more closely fits a hypothetical model of small business needs. That's fine, and I admire anyone who can make a small business work. I only worry that not all posters will get the subtext, and while you're not advising them to get anything you don't believe in, you are creating stories about what's good, what's overrated and what's underrated that are just that, stories...  th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

SJ

post #33 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Curious if you heard anything else about the Big Stix, or had a chance to try them. 

 

One of *my* favorite 97-98mm skis there;  I had high hopes for the Cham 97 but the FishStix had a larger sweet spot and enough tailpower to head back uphill when slush-carving.      

 

Downside: the Fishstix were more difficult to steer through shallow slush bumps using just hip flexion- the Chams made the task trivial. 

 

Caveat lector:  I was skiing with a rotator cuff tear, i.e. 'not in top form'


Edited by cantunamunch - 1/14/13 at 11:18am
post #34 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Caveat lector:  I was skiing with a rotator cuff tear, i.e. 'not in top form'

Ouch. Get well. I'm getting interested in these for bumps in trees. 

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