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Perpendicularity in the Bumps

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I took a lesson on New Years Day at Squaw.  Conditions were pretty awesome, a few days after a end of year December storm and not too busy.

 

The instructor had us skiing mainly bumps all day.  His advice: focus on keeping your skis perpendicular to the snow.

 

I could always survive moguls but I was never very good at them.  This season, I got new skis (Bonafides) and the combination of his tips, my new skis, and the whole morning had me skiing bumps better than I have in the past.

 

The perpendicular concept made sense to the math geek in me.  He showed us on the back side of a mogul how this changes from peak, to trough as you slide down the backside of the bump.

 

I hadn't really thought about going bases flat in the bumps until that day.  Pushing down on the tips/toes helped too.

 

Seemed a very powerful concept.

 

http://www.bumpsforboomers.com/secret-speed-control

 

Your thoughts on perpendicularity in the bumps? 


Edited by dmourati - 1/5/13 at 1:09pm
post #2 of 12
Do you mean low edge Angie / nearly flat sks?

Good ideas for speed control for sure
post #3 of 12

I can't think of any skiing that perpendicularity can't make better.

post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by docbrad66 View Post

Do you mean low edge Angie / nearly flat sks?
Good ideas for speed control for sure

 

Yes, flat to nearly flat skis relative to the portion of the bump your skis are on at any given moment.  This is changing as you slide/slip/pivot on and through the bumps.

post #5 of 12

How do all these branded Aspen camps for older people NOT cannibalize one another (Bumps for Boomer, Clendenin Method, Sports Diamond, whatever is left of 'Breakthrough on Skis')?

 

They often seem to have the same goal-get older people off the groomed using a flat/ drifted ski.  

 

Is there any video of what the Bumps for Boomers guys teach??

post #6 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post

How do all these branded Aspen camps for older people NOT cannibalize one another (Bumps for Boomer, Clendenin Method, Sports Diamond, whatever is left of 'Breakthrough on Skis')?

 

They often seem to have the same goal-get older people off the groomed using a flat/ drifted ski.  

 

Is there any video of what the Bumps for Boomers guys teach??

 

Jan 7, 2013

 

Hi Liam:

 

Following video is an example of their "Bumps for Boomers" method.  There is another video on the "green line", but it is only "talking" without any real skiing.  Anyway, this is enough for you to get an idea of what they are about.

 

 

Think snow,

 

CP

post #7 of 12

Those were pretty accomodating bumps for trying to do that. Don't know if that technique would work so well in "fangy" deep trough bumps with steeper backsides.

post #8 of 12
I don't think intro -to- bumps skiers will be looking to do anything but survive in " "fangy" deep trough bumps with steeper backsides." Flat-ski "smearing" against the sides of bumps keeps you out of the troughs. Sideslipping the ridge of bumps gets you to where you can smear another turn. Not your zipperline approach, but something that works with little impact for less athletic folks, especially those whose hair is as white as the surface they're sliding on.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmourati View Post

 

Yes, flat to nearly flat skis relative to the portion of the bump your skis are on at any given moment.  This is changing as you slide/slip/pivot on and through the bumps.

Riding a flat ski through decent moguls leaves you little options when it comes to speed control and direction change. Something you're going to need if you want to attack a bump run instead of just survive one. jmho

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmourati View Post

I took a lesson on New Years Day at Squaw.  Conditions were pretty awesome, a few days after a end of year December storm and not too busy.

 

The instructor had us skiing mainly bumps all day.  His advice: focus on keeping your skis perpendicular to the snow.

 

I could always survive moguls but I was never very good at them.  This season, I got new skis (Bonafides) and the combination of his tips, my new skis, and the whole morning had me skiing bumps better than I have in the past.

 

The perpendicular concept made sense to the math geek in me.  He showed us on the back side of a mogul how this changes from peak, to trough as you slide down the backside of the bump.

 

I hadn't really thought about going bases flat in the bumps until that day.  Pushing down on the tips/toes helped too.

 

Seemed a very powerful concept.

 

http://www.bumpsforboomers.com/secret-speed-control

 

Your thoughts on perpendicularity in the bumps? 

 

Best way to learn bumps is at one of these camps.

 

My thoughts? One of the best tips I got and a real breakthrough moment for me was at a mogul camp in Steamboat and Nelson Carmicheal, stand tall in the bumps, absorb, extend down the backside and stand tall or as you say, perpendicular with skis following the terrain.

 

just a thought from an old guy

post #11 of 12

I think it is easier to drift when the skis are tighter togeather then was shown in the video. Drifting helps to protect the body from a lot of wear & tear when the bumps are sharp & rock hard & allows for a large varity of turn shapes well keeping the skis parrellel. It is best to develope edging skills so a skier can drift  or edge or a combination of through the bumps.

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the feedback.  I can definitely carve, slip, and pivot slip: http://www.epicski.com/t/112706/essential-exercises-that-all-good-skiers-should-be-able-to-do

 

Combining these in the bumps made for this breakthrough.  That and I'm sure softer skis combined with pushing the toes down atop the bump.

 

I like the idea of the narrower stance as well.  Tight quarters in there sets the stage for needing to be more two-footed.

 

-D

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