or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Length of time for private lesson
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Length of time for private lesson

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

   I am planning to take some lessons this year, and was wondering, would it be better to take several one hour lessons, or one longer (half day) lesson. On the one hand several lessons would probably put me in different conditions, which would be good;  but I might get more out of a longer session. You guys are the experts, what say you? I would say I'm a solid level 7; but would like to get a little more consistency. Some days I feel unshakeable, and other times I struggle.

post #2 of 18

I'd vote for several lessons, assuming you can get the same instructor each time, and assuming that you "click" with your instructor.

 

If you do one long lesson, then you will get a lot of info, you'll go practice what you learned, but what you practice may not be what your instructor actually intended.  i.e., what they said and what you understood can be two different things.  If you break it up into several lessons, then there's a better chance of quickly catching any flaws in your new technique before you ingrain those flaws into muscle memory.

post #3 of 18
Now, after having been there and done this and that, i recommend you Invest the time and moneys and take several half day lessons... Find a good program first... That may be the hard part.
post #4 of 18

1 hour is way too short - depending on lifts and run that could amount to only 2 runs - its just not enough time to make an effective change

a series of 2-3 hour privates would be better

post #5 of 18

I had a couple great 90 min private lessons with a Level 3 instructor at Bridger, with several ski days in between.  I'm an older skier who is Level 8 when not tired.  We didn't do many runs, but the tips and drills I got from him made a big difference in terms of how the rest of my ski vacation went at Big Sky.  Have also had a 3-hour private at Alta that felt like a bit of a waste of time and money because the instructor was not as experienced.  Most of my skiing is done on small hills in the southeast.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chip inderhol View Post

   I am planning to take some lessons this year, and was wondering, would it be better to take several one hour lessons, or one longer (half day) lesson. On the one hand several lessons would probably put me in different conditions, which would be good;  but I might get more out of a longer session. You guys are the experts, what say you? I would say I'm a solid level 7; but would like to get a little more consistency. Some days I feel unshakeable, and other times I struggle.

post #6 of 18
Depends upon your current skills development and -- greatly important -- the resort you visit. An intermediate coming to a Western resort, for example, might spend 15-20 minutes on lifts just getting to where you'd ski. A single hour lesson would be pointless.
post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Depends upon your current skills development and -- greatly important -- the resort you visit. 

 The lessons would be at Meadows, my home hill. In good conditions I can ski down any run on the mt., and in bad conditions can get down any run. But I know the difference between skiing and just getting down, and would like to ski the bad stuff better. I have taken group lessons and found them helpful to a point, but thought a more focused approach would yield better results. Everyone seems to be in agreement that multiple lesson are the better way to go, so maybe I will try a 2 hour shot and just go from there. Thanks for your input everyone.

post #8 of 18

Two hours can be a decent interval.  I recommend you think about and make clear as specifically as possible what you are seeking from the lesson.  Also, for the best results, do not allow yourself to be randomly assigned to a private instructor.  It's a lot of money for a private.  Get word of mouth recommendations and specifics of style if you can.  Go for the highest level instructor you can get (i.e Level 3).  Also, one approach that I just tried out and liked, once the instructor gives you feedback...you be the coach and pretend he/she is the student...tell/show that person what is needed to make the required changes.  Understand the feedback at a level where you can visualize it in depth!


Edited by Ski Spirit - 1/5/13 at 10:21am
post #9 of 18

Do not settle for cues alone.  Ensure you understand the movement sequence and what happens where when in your body internally and how that translates to external results.  Then practice the movements at least 240 times.

post #10 of 18

So much depends on where your lesson are. Weekdays at a little hill, an hour will get you an hour of instruction with lift rides being just part of the lesson. At a big place with long lifts, 2 hours would be better as your lift time would exceed the useful lesson time. I got the most out of a 1 hour lesson per week with a great skier (Olympic medalist) at a bump of a hill every week all winter. I spent the rest of the week working on the drills, thoughts, etc. from the past lesson and then we moved on (or went back) to the next thing the next week. I also did 2 group race clinics with her during that winter. So I got lots of instruction and coaching.  By the end of that winter the progress was just dramatic. I suspect I've regressed in some areas since. But a half day would exceed my capacity to get useful information I think. In an hour, I can usually get two or 3 new drills  and play them back enough to get them down and to get one or two key concepts. That is probably all of the useful things I can practice enough  times during the interval to  try to get fully integrated in the course of a week. When I have had a half day lesson, I am not sure I get that much more useful.

post #11 of 18

i like what lito had to say about ski schools and why in his op so many ski schools fail, in his book

''Breakthrough on the new skis: how to escape the intermediate blues''.

 

of the key reasons is that students are often given too many things to work on

which can all of a sudden change and become more confusing if you get a new instructor each day ... 

your mind/body and one can't adapt to too many demands so quickly, even though you want to of course.

 

....in his op, get a good instructor to review you and request he give you a few key things to work on, but no more.

 

and then dig in working on that for a solid 1 or 2 wks (or many times out) before taking any more lessons to correct something else.

(if anything take a followup lesson to get feedback with said instructor on whatever it was you were working on those past few wks

before you move on...)

 

he sort of summed it as , a bad technique that is to be eradicated and replaced with a good technique takes repetition, repetition, repetition

to really create strong neuro-muscular pathways.

 

as one who's taken alot of lessons I think there's alot of wisdom in that methodical approach,

and wish I'd read it before I went all 'gung ho' and enrolling in so many lessons and not improving as fast as perhaps I could have otherwise.

 

and when you think about it, I think you can apply this to any number of sports and hobbies we might take up.


Edited by canali - 1/21/13 at 5:16pm
post #12 of 18

tried to edit before i got this in, too, but was too late

 

also ski schools are there to generate cashola, too, hence the desire for you as a consumer to take lots of lessons

and bring in $$$ to the resort's coffers.

 

this is not to say there is anything wrong about any business wanting to make lots of cash, just had I known what I know now what i did back then

i would have taken fewer lessons (each wkend i'd be taking a lesson!),

saved myself a whack of cash and probably been a better skier much quicker, by adopting such a method as lito suggested.

 

and yet here i am thinking of taking the wb 'dave murray' camp....,while writing this cool.gif

 

well my rationale would be, for a big change, i've taken NO lessons at all so far this yr (been out 15x)

....and if i do take the dave murray program or a wb 'max 4' group lesson i'll ask my instructor to focus on only a few things

for me to work on.

post #13 of 18

Ever seen yourself on film?? 

post #14 of 18

Book 5 half-day (morning) lessons, any mid-week day you can manage, spaced one week apart, make them privates and unless you have a reliable recommendation from someone who knows you and the staff, request the school's training director or deputy with minimum L3 certification.   It will be the best money you spent on skiing since you finally got decent boots.  Group lessons are a false economy.

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Group lessons are a false economy.

 

If you're getting a different instructor each time they can be hit or miss for sure.  Consistency of instruction is almost always helpful.

 

If you're an intermediate or better and looking to improve, IMO there's definitely value in getting some 'mileage' between lessons.

 

A lot of resorts are now also offering something in between, where it's a (small) group lesson with the same instructor and group for a number of weeks at a discount.  Often these are also geared towards intermediate or better skiers, so you're usually getting more senior instructors.  These can be a really good value if private lessons aren't in the budget.

 

The OP said he was skiing at "Meadows" but didn't say whether that was Alpine Meadows, Mt. Hood Meadows, or somewhere else.

 

If it's Mt. Hood, they do have a program like this: http://www.skihood.com/Lessons/Weekly-Group-Coaching-Sessions-Bussing

 

You can see how much cheaper this is; the midweek program is 8 weeks of 2-hour lessons for $280, whereas 8 2-hour group lessons there would be $440, and a single 2-hour private is $175.

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by molesaver View Post

  Group lessons are a false economy.

 

Yes.  Unless you are the only one who shows up, in which case group lessons are an amazing bargain. 

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by molesaver View Post

Group lessons are a false economy.

 

Depends on who's running the lesson. My coach is fantastic, and I get as much out of his group sessions as I do when we do private sessions. Similarly, CSIA's PDP sessions and courses (which arguably don't count as a lesson) are often as developmentally effective for participants as a private lesson. It depends on the instructor's ability to customize feedback for participants, and on how well your instructor understands your goals, competencies, etc. 

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

Depends on who's running the lesson. My coach is fantastic, and I get as much out of his group sessions as I do when we do private sessions. Similarly, CSIA's PDP sessions and courses (which arguably don't count as a lesson) are often as developmentally effective for participants as a private lesson. It depends on the instructor's ability to customize feedback for participants, and on how well your instructor understands your goals, competencies, etc. 

 

There you go.  The magic ingredient for great group lessons.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Length of time for private lesson