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Slithering Slowly Through Bumps

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Slithering Slowly Through Bumps

I can’t ski.  Well, I can’t ski bumps very well.  So by that criterion, I can’t ski.  I am looking for skis which prefer slithering slowly through moguls.

A solid intermediate skier, I’m 5'6" and 180 pounds with two bad knees.  I feel most comfortable on skis in the 88mm waist range.  I ski 15 - 25 times a season in the Inland Northwest.

Suggestions?

post #2 of 24

Rossi S3.

post #3 of 24

I'd look for a ski with some tip and tail rocker, the S3 was the first ski that came to mind. A few others in the 88mm range would be:

 

Blizzard Bushwhacker

Rossi Experience 88

Klint Pure

 

Nordica Soul Rider, a bit wider but really fun.

post #4 of 24

Don't buy skis just for this.  As long as your not on super stiff race skis or hyper carvers, zipper lines can be taken slowly and smoothly without causing any stress to your knees.  Up to a certain point, of course - if your skiing steep, tight, ice bumps good luck keeping it slow and smooth.  Taking a zipper line and banging through a zipper line like you're trying out for the olympics are entirely different.  Flex/absorb, extend, pivot, edge, repeat. 

post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

I'd look for a ski with some tip and tail rocker, the S3 was the first ski that came to mind. A few others in the 88mm range would be:

That is great advice.  I have some 183 TST's that due to the tip rocker ski like a 168 ski through bumps. Also, take lessons to work on your bump skills and practice.  I am nothing hot in the bumps, but can survive and like you said, if you can't ski bumps, your not a good skier.  Most of the terrain that intimidates me, is due to it being steep moguls, normally in the entrance.  If I am ever going to ski the entire mountain, I need to master those. So like myself, put on some rockered skis and take lessons. Once you get them down, you can ski anywhere.

post #6 of 24

When not in the bumps, what do you want the ski to do?  Or is that a concern at all?

 

The Watea 84 might be a good fit.  It doesnt get as much press as its bigger brothers

but has a light / playful feel.

 

If you are more off piste oriented get a mid 80s with soft snow bias. (ie the Watea)

 

If you are more on-piste then get something with that bias but not too top end

as the stiffness that shines on piste may punish you in the bumps.

 

 

You may find this information useful:

http://www.skinet.com/ski/moseleymoguls

 

To go slow you must scrub speed on the backside of the mogul as soon as your bindings

crest over.  This requires more absorbing (front side) than any other type of skiing, then quick extension to maintain ski/snow contact.   The longer you wait, the more speed you develop.

post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
When not in the bumps, what do you want the ski to do?  Or is that a concern at all?

Not really a concern.  I'm looking more for a soft snow or off piste biased ski rather than a hard snow or groomer ski.

post #8 of 24

^^^^Ding ding,  TST is a winner for that.  Read the reviews here and over at TGR.  I can still kill the firm snow or groomed snow on them too.

post #9 of 24
However the TST is 101 underfoot, the OP stated he was most comfortable around 88. Fisher Motive or Watea would be excellent options IMHO
post #10 of 24

 I think be careful not to  get your expectations up that by buying new skis suddenly the moguls will become simple. (unlike powder where when you get fat rockered skis over your cambered carvers, it's remarkably different)

I am by far no bump expert myself, but definitely suggest that it's going to be practice and education (either self study or lesson) over specific skis.  

The way I approached it is to master mini-moguls on low angle or just less formed areas, or even practice wiggling around on the flat; where if you mess up you can just plow over the next mogul, rather then getting thrown around.   If you're going into a long mogul field,  after a few falls either your confidence and/or muscles will be broken, then it's just going to be survival rather than improvement of skill during that run.


Edited by raytseng - 1/1/13 at 2:42pm
post #11 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by resonate11 View Post

Slithering Slowly Through Bumps

I can’t ski.  Well, I can’t ski bumps very well.  So by that criterion, I can’t ski.  I am looking for skis which prefer slithering slowly through moguls.

A solid intermediate skier, I’m 5'6" and 180 pounds with two bad knees.  I feel most comfortable on skis in the 88mm waist range.  I ski 15 - 25 times a season in the Inland Northwest.

Suggestions?

Well?

I hate to Beating_A_Dead_Horse_by_livius.gif, unless you can get a great deal on some boards, you really are better off spending your money on lessons.  Try to get the concept of upper and lower body separation.  Counter-rotataion is key to turning left and right back into the fall line over and over again while your shoulders are square to the hill.

 

If your current skis are racestock slaloms or other stiff as a corpse groomer slayers maybe you do need new boards but dollars to donuts your skis are just fine.

post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 

Whitemb, Whiteroom, and Liv2ski, except for the width, the S3 sounds like a ski I would like to try.  Which length do you recommend?

 

Docbrad66, I am attracted to the Watea skis. I loved my Atomic Snoop Daddies which were also light and lively.  Which length do you recommend?

post #13 of 24

S3 length for you would be the 178 IMO. I have Sultan 85s with obviously an 85 width. The difference in feel between those and the TST's are negligible. Both are very easy to get up on an edge and carve. For the soft conditions the OP stated he wants the ski for, a wider ski makes sense to me.  The S3 is 98 underfoot, is a very good ski and cheaply had if still in stock somewhere.

post #14 of 24

Moguls are not my fav place to ski so I slow down and pick my way through the mogul field by turning on the tops of the moguls and only going into the valleys between the moguls in order to get to the top of the next mogul.

 

Why I do this: On a steep slope the tops of the moguls are roundish/flatish and as such are not as steep as the actual run slope. The turning motion is really a pivoting or pointing of the feet with the front of the ski extending beyond the top of the mogul helping make the pivoting motion much easier. The tail of the ski will have more contact with the snow but is aided by skis with tail rocker.

 

Disclaimer: I am not a ski instructor so anything described above may not be accepted technique and may not work for others.

post #15 of 24

Blizzard Bushwackers are great bump skis.

post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by resonate11 View Post

 

Docbrad66, I am attracted to the Watea skis. I loved my Atomic Snoop Daddies which were also light and lively.  Which length do you recommend?

 

I would go with your 'usual' length.  If you like to really rip powder crud drops etc, go next size up.  See:  http://www.skinet.com/ski/gear/fischer-watea-84-2013

 

Note it says unchanged since last year so a used one might save you some dough...

post #17 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Blizzard Bushwackers are great bump skis.

Good to know.  These are definitely under consideration.

post #18 of 24

My Watea 84's are great in the bumps.  I've been skiing bumps since the 70's.

post #19 of 24

I have both the s3 and the Bushwacker, and think the wacker is much more versitile. I am about your height but 25lbs lighter and advanced on piste, but also a begginer in bumps and tree/off piste. I am very impressed with the 173 wackers performance envelope and ease of use. It is extremely easy to use, and a surprisingly stable groomer ski. Imo it is even more fun than the s3 in 12-18" of virgin or tracked out powder, but to be fair, my s3 is only 168cm (too short for me i think). Both are ok in the bump fields I guess, with maybe the s3 taking that category (bump valley slithering), but again, I don't know what i'm doing, and once out of the loose snow the s3 is squirrely and strange. To save money I am attending a few bump clinics, which are like big group lessons. What are you on now? Ofcourse boots are critical for control, and maybe the biggest factor influencing improvement, if they do not fit, or are too stiff you cannot even try to emmulate other more experienced skiers. lessons and clinics are the next biggest contributing factor to improving, and then ofcourse time on the snow. As far as skis, the Bushwacker 173 or the s3 in 178, I have never skied the TsT or the fischer,

post #20 of 24

Whiteroom's list is excellent. But keep in mind that OP has two bad knees. Bushwackers are the best for all around IMO, a hoot in bumps, but are lively, lot of snowfeel, lightness can become reactive in crud or at speed. Not ideal for bad knees. The S3's pronounced rocker will make them push button in moguls or trees, but elsewhere hmmm. I'd go with the E88's, actually. Smoothest and most stabile of the bunch, easy going in bumps, very versatile when OP is elsewhere.

 

And I'd encourage him to think about lessons - "solid intermediate" means at least able to navigate normal size and density bumps with basic roll-arounds, sans drama -  rather than getting a ski specifically for terrain that intimidates him but is so-so elsewhere...

post #21 of 24
post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

Beyond: E88s are a ski I could possibly demo as a local ski shop carries them.  But I thought they were a hard snow biased ski?  I used to ski on Volkl's AC40 which had great edge grip and carved wonderfully but, for me, were definitely a hard snow ski.  Are the Experience 88's similar?

 

I'm considering Kästle's BMX88. 

post #23 of 24

Search out the review forums for skis on your list.

 

Dawgcatching typically notes the bump performance of the skis he tests/reviews.

 

I believe the Rossi E"xx" line is more hard snow biased.

 

 

I've got an old old pair of dynastar twisters (flat, no binders) that i would sell for $25 plus shipping.

PM me if interested

 

Brad

post #24 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Dawgcatching typically notes the bump performance of the skis he tests/reviews.

Yes he does. In fact, his reviews of the BMX 88 skis are primarily what interests me in them.

 

By the way, docbrad66, thanks for your earlier lesson in post #6 on scrubbing speed.  Speed in difficult terrain is my nemesis.  Moguls on a green run are pleasant.  Moguls on a blue run are mostly fun.  But moguls on a black run quickly defeat me due to speed.  I understand that their are two ways to slow down: 1) increase friction, that is, put on the brakes and 2) let gravity act as a brake by going uphill if only slightly as when turning off of the fall line.  I can, and do, control my speed on groomed black runs.

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