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Rub On Wax

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I spoke with a local ski instructor who was applying a rub on wax prior to heading out to teach a lesson. The wax was a solid bar he kept in his pocket. He indicated that the product name was Snow Flow and was pleased with the effectiveness. I have attempted to locate the wax in local shops as well as online but can not find a rub on wax with this name.

 

Has anyone heard for this product or used something similar?

post #2 of 12

I've never heard of Snow Flow. I have so far not found a rub on I like for normal skiing. I tried the Swix F4 which I didn't like but lots of people seem to. The only one I actually like a lot is specialized - Dominator Butter - which is a soft rub on for very wet warm snow conditions. Since it is soft I have found it good for a few runs maximum but that is in the really wet sloppy sticky snow when nothing else works very well for long anyway.   I used it in VT last March in 80 degree weather. I've also used their Race Rocket rub ons but they are 1 run products as I use them that are more of an overlay than a general wax. I plan on ordering some other Dominator rub ons from their more general Momentium series but I haven't tried them yet. I wanted them for the cases where I missed the condition when I picked my hot wax - e.g.,  new snow and much colder when I waxed for old snow and warmer.

post #3 of 12

Don't know the one you mention, but these days I use either  Hertel Hot Sauce or Spring Solution. Depending on the time of year, I use one or the other as  a quick  rub on every day or two of skiing. Takes 60 seconds to crayon some on and cork it. Works great - in temps ranging from negative teens F to watery slush.  I virtually never bother hot waxing anymore.

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

Don't know the one you mention, but these days I use either  Hertel Hot Sauce or Spring Solution. Depending on the time of year, I use one or the other as  a quick  rub on every day or two of skiing. Takes 60 seconds to crayon some on and cork it. Works great - in temps ranging from negative teens F to watery slush.  I virtually never bother hot waxing anymore.

 

   Rub-ons (crayoning) will last for a few runs/half a day at best, but....nothing replaces a hot waxwink.gif

 

     zenny

post #5 of 12

I usually carry a small chunk of Beeswax and a small hotel bar of soap.

 

Beeswax is a good all around cheap quick fix wax when you've forgot to wax or conditions changed so drastically that something needs to be done.  Good for 2 or 3 runs max.

 

Soap.  Good for mild and warmer conditions.  Little more of a pain to apply because you want the ski dry just before you click in and go.  It works extremely well for that last added boost, but is good for only 20 or 30 second max.  Again cheap.

 

Good thing about both products is that they are cheap, non hazardous, most smell nice easy to obtain, and finally work.  Remember these are a quick fix.

 

I agree, a good wax job is worth its wt in gold, these solutions are just there when the wax job didn't work out as planned or you need a hill side quick cheap fix.  (I'd rather be skiing than waxing on a great day).

post #6 of 12

I've only had good performance with rubbed on wax in warm spring conditions.  When temps are below freezing I used to cork the wax in to the bases after rubbing it on and that worked pretty well for what it was (not a true hot wax). I've heard spray on wax works really well for a few runs.  I have some in my boot bag but haven't actually tried it yet.

post #7 of 12

I've noticed some people rub on the wax (crayoning) but don't run in the wax (corking or Ray's Way).  I think there still is a requirement for some friction heat to get the wax to adhere to the base.  I've used Dominator Zoom this way and have been happy with the results.

post #8 of 12

With any of the rub ons I've ever used, it takes a lot of corking/rubbing in to get them to last even 3 or 4 runs. You're right that you need heat from the friction to get any adhesion to the base at all - at least with the few products I've used but I don't generally like rub ons so I am a lot less experienced with them than many. Generally, I find rub ons to be a lot more work than hot wax plus it is work I have to do at least some of on the hill with no bench etc. so it is either awkward if I am standing up and trying to balance the ski upside down on something or else cold and messy as I kneel in the snow to put the wax on. This is an especially undesirable approach for me since I got a pair of white ski pants last winter.

post #9 of 12

Every day I crayon temperature appropriate SLIK to my chosen skis after cleaning the edges of burrs.

 

I buff with cork briskly then brush off the layer to leave bits of ptex structure showing.

 

Keeping the bases wet is easy even if it takes ten minutes of precious turn time from my day.

 

If I get deep gouges, I ignore them if no core is showing, but repair if it is.

 

I typically wear out the pop way sooner than ever lose the ski to base damage, and I tend to explore the rocky areas most.

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

With any of the rub ons I've ever used, it takes a lot of corking/rubbing in to get them to last even 3 or 4 runs. You're right that you need heat from the friction to get any adhesion to the base at all - at least with the few products I've used but I don't generally like rub ons so I am a lot less experienced with them than many. Generally, I find rub ons to be a lot more work than hot wax plus it is work I have to do at least some of on the hill with no bench etc. so it is either awkward if I am standing up and trying to balance the ski upside down on something or else cold and messy as I kneel in the snow to put the wax on. This is an especially undesirable approach for me since I got a pair of white ski pants last winter.

 

Putting race aside for the moment -

 

My feelings/thoughts/experience are that if you successfully prep your skis, crayoning/corking something like Zoom in now and again will give you a successful day of skiing.  Will you shave .05 off your time in a race; no, but if you need to do that, why are you not hot waxing?

 

By appropriately prepping them, I mean several hot cycles of wax so the bases are saturated.  I will, in between hot waxing, I brush, crayon in Zoom, use the Ray's Way (RW) doohicky, just to smooth it out, then take my roto cork to it to really get it in there, one or two passes with a scraper and brush them out.

 

So far has worked great.  Using the roto cork is mainly out of laziness and having a bad shoulder.  I can make one pass with the roto cork and accomplish what RW would in ten or so minutes and I don't get an aerobic work out smile.gif.

 

I tend to use the RW even when I hot wax.  First I crayon on, then RW before I drip more on.  This way I know the iron will never touch naked Ptex. 

 

I consider rubbing good for a day (as long as the prep work is done) and hot waxing good for a weekend or so depending on conditions and the amount/type of skiing I'm doing.

 

RW is a bit of work but the advantage is you don't have to put iron heat to your bases.  I don't think I can create enough friction to damage my skis with RW.  Roto corking possible but that would be more from wear than heat and delamination.

 

I've never done this on the hill and have never seen anyone do it gracefully on the hill either.  Successfully, yes, but it does look awkward. 

 

Ken

post #11 of 12

i use the swix f4 paste occasionally when hot waxing isn't possible. Maybe it is better than rubbing on a solid bar i don't know. It's benefits are good for a half day but without cleaned out bases it's never as quick side to side or straight ahead as a properly waxed ski
 

post #12 of 12
I have not had much success with rub on wax. I much prefer paste wax, which also can be carried in your pocket.

I have no reccommendations of brands; they are all good and are avaliable at most good ski shops
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