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Suggestions for downsizing?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
New to the forum. Im 18. Around 170 lbs at 5'9". I consider myself an indermediate to advanced skier. I can do black diamonds with relative ease. I just upgraded from a pair of Rossignol Axium skis on 162 cm to a pair of Line Prophet 90's in 172 cm. I had an extremely hard time turning these the past two days at Whiteface in NY. I feel they're too long and pretty heavy for a park ski. I'm tight on cash and am considering sellng these for something shorter and a little thinner but still twin tip. What do you guys think?
post #2 of 9
Welcome to EpicSki. I think you have a technique problem. I'm 5'7-1/2", 150 pounds and my daily driver is a 170cm Nordica Steadfast. I don't ski in the park, but spend most of my time in bumps, trees and powder. At your height and weight, you should have no problem turning the P90s. I demoed them last year and while they did't thrill me, I had no difficulty with them. IIRC you can't be half asleep on these, they require being driven and also a centered stance. Take a lesson and tell them you need to find out what is lacking in your technique.
post #3 of 9
It may be a tuning problem. In pre early rise P90s tips and tails should be detuned back to contact point. If not they can be very hooky and hard to control. Not sure about the early rise P90s, have someone check them out.
post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ursinamus View Post

New to the forum. Im 18. Around 170 lbs at 5'9". I consider myself an indermediate to advanced skier. I can do black diamonds with relative ease. I just upgraded from a pair of Rossignol Axium skis on 162 cm to a pair of Line Prophet 90's in 172 cm. I had an extremely hard time turning these the past two days at Whiteface in NY. I feel they're too long and pretty heavy for a park ski. I'm tight on cash and am considering sellng these for something shorter and a little thinner but still twin tip. What do you guys think?

The P90s were not designed as a park ski. They were designed as an all mountain ski. For a guy your size and ability level, that should be the right length.

As mentioned earlier, try taking a lesson. You will add something to your skillset that will make you ski the P90s better.

D.
post #5 of 9
IMO selling the p90's and going back to what you are used to is a backward step in your skiing development. The axiums are begiiner/low intermediate skis. It sounds like a skill/technique issue to me.
Black diamond runs are not the exclusive realm of advanced skiiers. Intermediate skiiers should be comfortable on black diamond runs.
You mention being light on for cash and instruction is expensive but its the best option if you wish to develop you skiing? Those axiums are beginner/ low intermediate skis.
Cheers
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigr View Post

IMO selling the p90's and going back to what you are used to is a backward step in your skiing development. The axiums are begiiner/low intermediate skis. It sounds like a skill/technique issue to me.
Black diamond runs are not the exclusive realm of advanced skiiers. Intermediate skiiers should be comfortable on black diamond runs.
You mention being light on for cash and instruction is expensive but its the best option if you wish to develop you skiing? Those axiums are beginner/ low intermediate skis.
Cheers

Agree with most of that post.

Don't really agree that intermediates should be "comfortable on" black diamond runs. They may be "comfortable" telling a shop guy that's where they're "comfortable," but that's a whole different story from actually being comfortable. biggrin.gif

It would really depend on what mountain we're talking about. Some places the Black Diamond runs are quite easy for upper-intermediate skiers, but other places they are well over the skillset of an intermediate level skier.

The run you put yourself on is not really a measure of your skiing ability. The only measure of your skiing ability is your actual skiing! A very daring skier could put him/herself on runs well over his/her ability, and while that would speak to the skier's daring, it wouldn't speak to the skier's actual skiing abilities.

In order to optimally match a skier to a set of boots or skis, the skier's actual skiing ability would have to be honestly appraised. This is hard to do when ski shops aren't in the middle of the mountain and shop employees can't actually gauge your skiing. Best to know how the skier makes a turn, and where that turn falls apart on the run difficulty scale. An intermediate skier who survives a Black Diamond run isn't really "comfortable" on that run from the viewpoint of an instructor who would be measuring that skier's ability for the purpose of helping the skier improve.

Sometimes a skier can be on skis that make improvement tougher. Forgiveness is a good feature for skiers whose technique contains a lot of inefficient and/or counter-productive moves.
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Ok I can see what you mean as this being the next step in being a better skier. As mentioned I was skiing at Whiteface mountain in NY. We recieved decent snowfall but the conditions on the mountains were mixed. Powder varied from 4" to 12" in some spots.

One very common terrain I encountered was the constant bumps resembling moguls from the buildup of powder. This really tested my ability to maneuver, since this was my first time with the longer skis. I was constantly catching my front tips together and even the rears once or twice. I apologize for using a specific run to gauge my ability, I was in a hurry to type and didn't think much about it. I'd still consider myself at least an intermediate skiier if not partially advanced.

I'm going to try the P90's on my local mountain, Blue Mountain in PA, and see how well I can turn them there. I'm hoping less powder and wider trails will let me get used to them before diving in like I did this past week. I've read about the specific tuning for these skis but am a little lost. Any links to an explanation for dummiea would be great. Thanks guys!
post #8 of 9
I really don't think it's as easy as "longer skis" being your issue.

Circa 2012 skis are very helpful, but improvement as a skier still is not as easy as (1) buy new skis; (2) blame the skis if you're not instantly better. The ski industry doesn't help much on this score, skis are sold as "game-changers" that are supposed to make a beginner into an expert just by getting on new skis. The fundamentals of good skiing remain, though, and if you're struggling on a new set of skis that are designed for a more advanced skier, most times it's because your skiing isn't technically solid enough to handle the new skis.

I think you'd enjoy your ski days a lot more if you took a few lessons with a good instructor. Take several, use the same person so he/she gets to know your habits and your learning style. Using the same instructor is more efficient than just taking a series with different instructors.
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ursinamus View Post

One very common terrain I encountered was the constant bumps resembling moguls from the buildup of powder. 

 

Those would indeed be 'young' moguls. smile.gif

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Suggestions for downsizing?