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Best skier vehicle? - Page 6

post #151 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post


They may have different models for other markets. Land Cruisers enthusiasts, for example, drool over models produced for these regions that are not available in North America.

And then you have 'new money' that will buy luxury SUV's and beat the hell out of them. A lot of that stuff shows up on vid. A winch and a willingness to incur throttle based damage can be a great equalizer.

 

 

Too funny!  BMW has been taking them on tour in thier "off road" courses but none of what I have seen is equal to what a rutted or rocky fire road presents. i have an 07 x3 now and it's been on dirt roads with minor ruts without icidence but....  one thing they put on all x3's is hill descent control: like huh?

post #152 of 175

Toyota Sienna with their 60/40 split 3rd row seat.

 

Available FWD and AWD.

 

AWD.... gets runflat tires... which means snow tires can get very pricey

 

Snow tires are a good thing in the winter, especially a skiier, even with AWD

post #153 of 175

Good snow tires are more important than AWD (and cheaper!) unless you're living in real mountains.  For the mid-atlantic and midwest (where the OP is located) if the snow is that bad, the ski areas probaby won't be open anyway....

post #154 of 175

I'm looking for the perfect one vehicle quiver... 

 

I drive 75% flat, warm city and highway pavement

I drive 15% spring, summer, fall off road beaches and lakeside camping

I drive 10% ski trips mostly warm dry pavement for 130 of the 160 miles to the resort.  The last/first 30 miles can get sketchy.

 

Family of 4, weighing from 50 pounds to 250 pounds. 

 

I've recently run with an Isuzu Trooper LS with A/T tires and a Subaru Forester with winter rated all seasons.

 

What do folks recommend to do all of the above perfectly and not have to change tires in the winter?

post #155 of 175
Our 4wd Pilot Touring is the bomb
post #156 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I'm looking for the perfect one vehicle quiver... 

I drive 75% flat, warm city and highway pavement
I drive 15% spring, summer, fall off road beaches and lakeside camping
I drive 10% ski trips mostly warm dry pavement for 130 of the 160 miles to the resort.  The last/first 30 miles can get sketchy.

Family of 4, weighing from 50 pounds to 250 pounds. 

I've recently run with an Isuzu Trooper LS with A/T tires and a Subaru Forester with winter rated all seasons.

What do folks recommend to do all of the above perfectly and not have to change tires in the winter?

Just modernize the Trooper (a 4Runner or such) and the AT tires (Hankook Dynapro ATM, Nitto Terra Grappler, or such). This gives you low range for the beach and any heavier snow, good year round traction tires, and plenty of space for 4. If you are really concerned about traction, then go with the Goodyear Duratrac.
post #157 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

one thing they put on all x3's is hill descent control: like huh?

It's all electronics and is really just a flavor of VDC..the evolution of taking mechanical things and converting them to electronic management. Cheap to implement once you have the programming and sensors so why not...?
post #158 of 175

I was relieved to see at least one other picture of an earlier Cherokee. As more of a four wheeling oriented Jeeper, I do also consider the Grand to be a luxury boat. Either way, both of them offered the 4.0, and both have a solid front axle.

 

Mine's a 96, was two wheel drive for most of it's mileage, converted to FWD/AWD around 150K. They were pretty solid from 94 to 04, long as you get the 4.0 and the AW4 automatic.

 

I'm amazed at the dumb **** that I can drive through with the case in FULL TIME 4X4. PART TIME is better suited for dry trails.

 

Anyhow, my point is that the 94-04 Cherokees are cheap, bulletproof nearly, and readily available. I'm approaching 250K miles, and my factory heat and AC still work just fine.

post #159 of 175

We had a Cherokee Sport 4.0 years ago.  One thing I did notice about that and my Trooper LS is that the full 4X4 mid-large truck type vehicles require more effort to keep straight when driving in the snow than the Symmetry AWD Subies do.  The Trooper and Cherokee tended to wander around more and needed more steering correction.  As for deep snow, both were pure beasts at getting through, just took a little more attention to detail to keep it running on the preferred path.

post #160 of 175
I had an AWD 1997 Cherokee....you typically wanted to be in 4 hi once the AWD started getting jittery. As is the theme on these threads, though, VDC controls all of this now...you can't really compare old school mechanical AWD to VDC controlled AWD except to note that VDC is vastly superior at speed.
post #161 of 175
Thread Starter 

str8d0wn, I'm not going to be heading there to do any spark plug checks 'cuz I just had my shoulder scoped yesterday. But if I were, those were some nice instructions which you gave - thanks!  But you can do it if you want to. . . .

 

http://kdkauto.com/details.cfm?searchvkid=1379021&cftoken=22cdc53bc42ca37f-C27ED878-C74F-D96D-E54CE815F53D2651&cfid=29863417

 

And yes, I do like that idea of the lift-up tailgate as opposed to side-opening.

 

Tog, I did almost fall for another Camry I saw. . . OR, I could try one of those beasts which you posted a pic of.

 

It turns out that my new driver can't take the test until July (didn't realize about the six-month mandatory wait permit after getting temps). So I have many more months to surf the internet car sales and irritate salespeople with my indecision.

 

Thanks, all, for the continuing advice and suggestion contributions!

 

Kitty

post #162 of 175

Not sure if this has been covered. For what its worth, Subaru has a new model this year, the XV Crosstrek, an Impreza with greater ground clearance etc. 9" clearance (3" more than the standard Impreza) isn't  bad for a comfortable AWD car with decent fuel mileage.

post #163 of 175
Thread Starter 

Funny that you should mention the Crosstrek, Oisin, because I had seen info on that vehicle and DID think that it would seem to meet our needs very nicely. But. . . . since we are looking for an older vehicle, it might work out where it becomes the NEXT "used" vehicle we look at in a few years when the Camry dies.

 

We keep changing our plans daily as to what we are looking for. The most recent thought by my teen was that we buy a circa-2006 Subaru wagon of sorts which will go by the moniker of. . . . The Wagon. Perhaps I need to jump on that thought before it changes into dreams of buying some souped-up rear-wheel-drive teen-macho racecar!

 

Kitty

post #164 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I'm looking for the perfect one vehicle quiver... 

 

I drive 75% flat, warm city and highway pavement

I drive 15% spring, summer, fall off road beaches and lakeside camping

I drive 10% ski trips mostly warm dry pavement for 130 of the 160 miles to the resort.  The last/first 30 miles can get sketchy.

 

Family of 4, weighing from 50 pounds to 250 pounds. 

 

I've recently run with an Isuzu Trooper LS with A/T tires and a Subaru Forester with winter rated all seasons.

 

What do folks recommend to do all of the above perfectly and not have to change tires in the winter?

Up until this past August I had a Trooper (which my son is now driving).  What a beast but they are rugged as hell. 

 

If you are looking for something fairly cheap and don't mind having something not quite as fuel efficient as the newest vehicles, check out a Mitsubishi Endeavor AWD.  Fairly large but car-based so they ride and handle much better than a truck, and they are quite cheap for what you get.  Very good reliability.  I now have a Mitsubishi Montero Sport, and would have gotten the Endeavor but since the primary purpose was towing a boat, I wanted something with a frame on body construction.

A local dealer had a brand new 2011 leftover for about $22k, which is about $10k off MSRP.  Used ones go for quite a bit less than equivalent Toyotas

post #165 of 175

I live in upstate NY and purchased a 2011 Subaru Outback about two years ago.  Ski mainly in Adirondacks and Northern Vermont.  Outback is great car with plenty of room for four skiers if you have a box on the roof.   Three fit comfortably with skis and gear for the weekend inside the car...just fold back seat down to fit the skis.  With the car fully loaded I may get 25 mpg on a good day (that is with the four cylinder engine).  I would agree that the Outback has good ground clearance and that is a big plus.  Mine is also equipped with heated seats, mirrors and a remote starter for the cold days.

post #166 of 175
all-season snow tire?

nokian wr g2 or wr g2 suv
post #167 of 175

Not sure if it's been posted before but maybe check out the Honda Element.  All wheel drive (of sorts), very reliable, practical, roomy, and it gets decent mileage.
 

post #168 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

Not sure if this has been covered. For what its worth, Subaru has a new model this year, the XV Crosstrek, an Impreza with greater ground clearance etc. 9" clearance (3" more than the standard Impreza) isn't  bad for a comfortable AWD car with decent fuel mileage.


This is also a good option but not much room on the inside.  I think it's an Impreza platform.

post #169 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by beaterdit View Post


This is also a good option but not much room on the inside.  I think it's an Impreza platform.

Our Impreza (I forget the year, just passed the 300,000 mile mark) has plenty of room if you put a box on the roof. It seems to me you really don't want your skis inside unless you're driving a Denali or something really large . Sure there's a mileage penalty due to increased drag but what's the mileage on those huge SUV's anyway?

post #170 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by oisin View Post

Our Impreza (I forget the year, just passed the 300,000 mile mark) has plenty of room if you put a box on the roof. It seems to me you really don't want your skis inside unless you're driving a Denali or something really large . Sure there's a mileage penalty due to increased drag but what's the mileage on those huge SUV's anyway?

In now days some SUV have pretty competitive  mpg consumption. If you compare the amount of space and comfort you get out of impreza or Legacy vs let's say Honda Ridgeline, the 3 mpg you don't save is not a steep penalty to pay for the comfort and space. 

 

2006 AWD Impreza - 18 city 20 combined 24 Hwy 

2006 Ridgeline           16 city  18 combined 21 Hwy 

post #171 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I'm looking for the perfect one vehicle quiver... 

 

I drive 75% flat, warm city and highway pavement

I drive 15% spring, summer, fall off road beaches and lakeside camping

I drive 10% ski trips mostly warm dry pavement for 130 of the 160 miles to the resort.  The last/first 30 miles can get sketchy.

 

Family of 4, weighing from 50 pounds to 250 pounds. 

 

I've recently run with an Isuzu Trooper LS with A/T tires and a Subaru Forester with winter rated all seasons.

 

What do folks recommend to do all of the above perfectly and not have to change tires in the winter?

What's your definition of off road? If it just means not a paved road, the suburu wagons, as everyone has said are great. The Xterra is also sweet for camping and a little more capable for off road.

 

Just to throw in here, so people understand, ground clearance doesn't really mean much, at least in the traditional way it is marketed. Manufacturers will measure from ground to side rocker panel, ground to differential (which is vary misleading in vehicles with IFS), ect. The lowest point on teh vehicle is the definition for off roading and the only meaningful way to change this on a car is with larger tires. This means that although a subaru may perform exmplary on dirt/fire roads, it will never perform in a meaningful way in a true offroad environment. It simply has to many factors stacked against a major one being it's small tires.   

post #172 of 175

Speaking of large tires for off road use, check this out. Oh the path not taken. But there's still time!

She says it's good on ice since it's powered by gravity.

The Dynasphere:

 

britishpathe                                                                                                                          http://youtu.be/rvA7hDh_vhY

post #173 of 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Speaking of large tires for off road use, check this out. Oh the path not taken. But there's still time!

She says it's good on ice since it's powered by gravity.

The Dynasphere:

 

Thats awesome! Takes all wheel drive to a new level!

post #174 of 175
I've got a V-8 powered 4runner with Snowtires and it's never let me down in the heavy snow we get in the PNW. It's our ski hauler in the winter and boat puller in the summer. My family is expanding so my wife wants a bigger vehicle with 3 rows of seats, I need something to tow my 6k lb boat so we settled on an expedition, but I'm impatiently waiting for Ford to drop the Ecoboost engine into it.
post #175 of 175
Thread Starter 

And the winner is. . . . 2006 CR-V!!!

 

Many of you probably gave up and thought that this day would never come. . . as did my son. But after many months of hemming and hawing and lurking in/on every used car lot and website, we finally bought it!

 

It ended up being a case of ruling out many other vehicles for one reason or another, and my finally getting tired of driving around a child who has a valid license but no vehicle. We went back and forth (every day, it seemed) between my keeping the 1999 Camry for me and getting him another older vehicle, and my getting the newer used vehicle and his getting the Camry. 

 

The Subarus were sort of my dream vehicles, but the only ones where I could fit my tall son into the rear (because he also has many tall friends who might sit back there) were the newest generations, and I decided to limit my budget to $10K, so that pretty much ruled out those.

 

I liked the Rav4s, but couldn't find a 4WD with sunroof in my budget without going too old on the generation and forfeiting stability control (they are probably out there, but didn't pop up around here during my search).

 

I didn't want too big of a vehicle, but wanted to stay away from a sedan so that I can pack more into it. My son kept telling me just to give up the search and just grab up another Camry - "We don't need an SUV, Mom - we really don't have as exciting a life as you imagine . . " he told me. WHAT?!?!

 

Last weekend, we had it narrowed down to two vehicles: a 2003 Pontiac Vibe (mentioned by NJskier164 - thanks!) which did not have stability control but was otherwise a fun and functional vehicle except for the slightly odd rack (a rack-less Toyota Matrix twin might have been better), and it did have a couple of small maintenance items which might have to have been addressed; and the 2006 Honda CR-V, which was marked down $1000 in price the night before we went to test-drive the Vibe.

 

I decided that rather than have two older vehicles (1999 and 2003) which might both have maintenance issues (since the Camry's exhaust was begging a visit to the muffler shop that day) AND due to the fact that my newly licensed son was a little, um, scary driving the Vibe which didn't have as good of visibility. . . . well, the markdown in price of the CR-V meant that we were meant to have it!

 

I picked it up Monday and have much enjoyed driving it all week, and my son has been equally happy with having the Camry at his beck-and-call. We'll have to get some snow tires on both of these for the winter.

 

Now I am replacing my hours of online car shopping with online equipment shopping. . . .I need to get crossbars, and a ski rack (box will have to wait for later after I recover from writing the Big Check this week to the dealership). . . and a bike rack.

 

If I hurry and order TOMORROW (Sunday), REI still has 20% off of both Thule and Yakima, though if I don't make up my mind by then, I might have to wait months for the next sale.

 

If anyone has any comments (and I think I'll post on the bicycling thread too) on spare tire bike racks for a CR-V, feel free to let me know. I don't have a hitch (yet?) and can't be climbing to the roof with bikes. I have read pros and cons on both the Thule and Yakima versions - would love to hear from someone who has actually put one on a CR-V. We currently have mountain bikes, but want to be able to put road bikes on them too.

 

Also, for crossbars. . . I see rounds, squares, aerodynamic ones. . . The Thule rep was trying to tell me how nice the Edge would look ("like factory") - though it wouldn't give me the extra width if for some reason I needed to put a rack and a box side-by-side up there, as would the square/rounds which extend out a little. But we don't usually have to pack that much, so I don't know that I need to plan for every scenario. I am, though, trying to prepare for my son's loading up the vehicle with friends and equipment (or I could do the same. . . .)

 

The CR-V does have a little road noise already compared to what I am used to, so I am thinking that the more aerodynamic bars might be better, 'cuz I don't want to end up having to get a faring too. And I want to keep on the bars year-round so I can strap on. . . whatever. . . any time.

 

Thank you to everyone for all of your wonderful additions to this thread! They were priceless!!

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