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Stanley Surform Tool? Questions

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hi. I just got my yearly order from Tognar and decided to do a tune up. This involved a ptex repair. I had this tool, but I was a little wary. It looked kind of sketchy for my base... I found this video and copied the action in which they used the surform tool --- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERMDhZbWiy4

 

Just In case I decided to see what it did to my old 210s. Pulling was okay, but pushing was where the tool really cut into the base and definitely left some scratches. So after watching the video, I copied Scott's action by pulling the tool over the repair, I noticed a small series of scratches. Once I finished and scraped, it was definitely a rough repair... Now I don't mind much because a stone grind will fix it, and I'm not a racer so th_dunno-1[1].gif  And I don't want to blame the tool, as the video resulted in an awesome repair, but I was wondering if someone can give me advice on future jobs. Thanks!

 

BTW I use the tognar base repair iron and ptex ribbon for my repairs

post #2 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by gargoyle View Post

 Once I finished and scraped, it was definitely a rough repair... Now I don't mind much because a stone grind will fix it, and I'm not a racer so th_dunno-1[1].gif  And I don't want to blame the tool, as the video resulted in an awesome repair, but I was wondering if someone can give me advice on future jobs. 

 

The Surform tool is only meant to rapidly take down big heaps of relatively-soft material standing high from the rest of the base.  

 

As soon as you think the Surform will scratch the rest of the base, switch to using the steel scraper.     If your steel scraper is sharp, if you work patiently and gradually increase the angle of the scraper to the base, there is no need for a welded repair to look at all rough.

 

Repeating the above, in different words:

 

When the welded ribbon is standing high from the base and you need to remove a lot of material - use the surform.   Otherwise use a sharp steel scraper.   Start holding it like \ and work patiently on small sections at a time.  If you hold it too vertical at the start, you will rip out the ribbon.    As the scraper starts removing more actual base material,  hold it more vertical like |  and it will leave a smoother repair. 

 

(You can think of the surform as a bunch of virtual, tiny steel scrapers held at a 20 degree angle to the base, only with a much better handle and no chance of changing the cutting angle.  Low cutting angle - rapid removal but you have to watch out for tearout on soft materials,  and only cut tiny amounts at a time.   High cutting angle - smoother final finish, especially in harder materials. )

post #3 of 13

   Good advice cantunamunchicon14.gif  I REALLY like this steel scraper  http://www.race-werks.com/svst-4mm-steel-base-scraper/ . Kinda spendy and it doesn't bend, though...

 

 

    zenny

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

Ohh I'm using a bahco steel scraper now. It looks very thin compared to zentune's. Yeah I was probably using the surform tool when it wasn't necessary then. The problem I have is that I use the pulling/cutting method, and usually when I'm pulling, the scraper gets stopped at a "ptex wall." I suppose this is when I need to use the surform tool, or use a razor blade?

post #5 of 13

That Surform tool is designed for wood and looks very crude and the scraper is slow. I use an autobody file used for filing lead and bondo in body repair Perfect for rapid safe plastic removal. I looked for a picture but couldn't find one. They are about in inch wide and have crescent shaped 'teeth' about 1/4" apart so they do not clog. I then fine finish with scraper etc.

post #6 of 13

In my shop I've used every possible tool for flushing down a welded repair & by far the best solution is to use a sharp 1" chisel (bevel down). It leaves a super smooth finish which just needs a few longitudinal rubs with some medium grit paper to add some structure.

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by spyderjon View Post

In my shop I've used every possible tool for flushing down a welded repair & by far the best solution is to use a sharp 1" chisel (bevel down). It leaves a super smooth finish which just needs a few longitudinal rubs with some medium grit paper to add some structure.

   I've got a buddy who does this as well--he also rounds the corners slightly to avoid inadvertent base gougingeek.gif

 

     zenny

post #8 of 13
Thanks for the tip. I used one tonight and it worked great. I dont think you need to blunt the corners, unless you dont have steady hands or maybe have too much tuning lubrication in your system.
post #9 of 13

cool. I'll give it a try. Thanks!

post #10 of 13

I use a woodworking chisel bevel up with the flat of the blade flat on the base--less (no) chance of going too deep--but I still take thin passes so as not to pull out the repair--(which shouldn't really be an issue if I've welded it properly but . . .) .  If the repair is away from the edge I might use a block plane.  The problem with using tools like that is you have to know how to sharpen them and have the stones to do it--unlikely unless you're a woodworker.  With files and surforms there's nothing to sharpen.  

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by gargoyle View Post

The problem I have is that I use the pulling/cutting method, and usually when I'm pulling, the scraper gets stopped at a "ptex wall." I suppose this is when I need to use the surform tool, or use a razor blade?


Use a razor blade to taper down the "ptex walls" flush with the base before you start with the surform. If the repair is big enough, you can also pull or push the surform from the middle toward the ends of the repair, and you're less likely to pull it out. As previously stated, this is not the final tool for finishing, just a quick first step.

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post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I use a woodworking chisel bevel up with the flat of the blade flat on the base--less (no) chance of going too deep--but I still take thin passes so as not to pull out the repair--(which shouldn't really be an issue if I've welded it properly but . . .) .  If the repair is away from the edge I might use a block plane.  The problem with using tools like that is you have to know how to sharpen them and have the stones to do it--unlikely unless you're a woodworker.  With files and surforms there's nothing to sharpen.  

+1

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks all for the great advice

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