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How to cure fogging glasses?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Have now reached the age that I need to wear glasses when skiing.  Have found a couple of pairs of Giro googles that fit nicely over my glasses and fit well with my helmet.  Now the problem is after skiing a bit, whenever I stop to rest, my glasses fog over.  Once I get moving again, they clear up, so there is enough air movement to keep them clear when I'm skiing (but those first few turns when I can't see a thing are a bit tricky!).  I've tried some of the anti-fog wipes, they help, but don't eliminate the problem.  Wondering what other glasses-wearing Bears have found to keep their glasses clear?

post #2 of 24
Usually the fogging is due to your exhaled breath, or the heat coming up through the chimney opening at the top of your jacket (where it's zipped up near your neck). Sometimes if you're dressed a bit too warmly it's worse.
post #3 of 24
As a PNW skier where the humdity is high, using anti-fog treatment on my glasses works. Ditch your Giro goggles. Get the Smith OTG Turbo Fan goggles. There are various models of them. They work. Turn the fan on before you need it (e.g. before starting down a mogul run).
post #4 of 24

exactly which antifog wipes did you use?  And are your glasses truly fogging up or are they getting water droplets.


I've had great success with the antifog cloth wipe that I picked up from rei.  t's a dry cloth that you rub onto your that your clean glassses.  Reminds me somewhat like a dryer sheet:

here's what it was:

http://www.safetyglassesusa.com/se-fog98.html

 

With that treatment, I don't get fog.  If it gets really humid then a clear sheen of water builds up, then droplets, meaning that the limits of humidity have been reached

I suppose it also depends on the material for the lenses and the specific temperature properties of that material. Glass will be different then polycarb.

 

  If you're really are getting actual fog, then try a different anti-fog product.

 

If your glasses are reaching the maximum level of humidy (no fog but you get sheen and droplets) then there's nothing more anti-fog can do, and you got to work on your body temp or goggles with more ventilation to get the humidity out.  Try opening the top of your jacket when stopped or when you are warm so the heat doesn't just chimmney stack up to your goggles.    What are you wearing on your head?  Perhpas it needs better ventilation as well.

post #5 of 24

I found the best thing ever to regulate my fogging is to regulate my body temperature. Most people dress too warm as it is.
 

post #6 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lex View Post

. Ditch your Giro goggles. Get the Smith OTG Turbo Fan goggles. There are various models of them. They work. Turn the fan on before you need it (e.g. before starting down a mogul run).

 

What he said.  If you need anti fog for the glasses use FogTech anti fog. It's available on Amazon.  It's the best I have found, but I use it more for cycling. Nothing really needed with the Turbo Fan goggles.

post #7 of 24

Wearing glasses under goggles while skiing seems to present difficulties for lots of skiers. It's certainly been discussed ad nauseam on this form with lots of great info provided.   If you search EpicSki for "skiing with goggles" you'll find a ton of discussion on this topic.  Most (but not all) of it not encouraging.  I suffered the same issues for a couple years, even with the Smith OTG Turbo Fan goggles and trying the anti-fog wipes, etc.  I suspect some people just generate more heat than others.  In the end I finally went to contacts for skiing.  All my (fogging) problems solved. 

post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdleuck View Post

  In the end I finally went to contacts for skiing.  All my (fogging) problems solved. 

I tried contacts years ago and couldn't get beyond dry-eye irritation.  My solution (for more than 20 years now, and with the same goggles) is OTG Bollé Goggles (circa 1990) and the Bollé Rx inserts.  They clip into the frame, closer to the goggle lens than one's face, and I just don't have fogging problems under most conditions.  I think perhaps the lenses being some distance from the skin may help.  I've used this rig so long that I had to replace the foam on the goggle vents because it had rotted away (and the elastic seems to get softer by the year, but is just right for a helmet's circumference).  I had the foresight to buy an extra goggle frame and lens years ago, so I'm set.

 

You still have to clean four surfaces after the occasional face-plant, however; that doesn't change...

post #9 of 24

For there to be fog in the goggles there must be moisture in there.  The moisture either comes from your face sweating (unlikely) or your exhaled breath working its way UP into the goggles.  Check the fit at the nose.  Does the goggle foam wrap around the bridge of your nose snugly?  If not, and if there's a gap under there, that might be the doorway for your warm moist breath getting inside the goggles.  I almost always have this happen with my goggles.  If this is the problem, cut some foam from old goggles and glue it into the gap.  Fog will be gone.

post #10 of 24

Put on your goggles first thing in the morning, and leave them on. I find less fogging if I don't take the goggles off until lunch break etc. If I remove the goggles and the glasses get cooled by ambient air, they fog up much faster. So keep those goggles on in the gondola or when waiting in the lift line. +1 to keeping from overheating, the excess heat from your body will chimney up and cause fogging.

 

Some years (decade) ago I picked up some strange waxy bar at a ski show. It was pink and you crayoned it onto your goggles and glasses and then polished it with a soft cloth. To this day I still haven't found anything else that worked as well; even compared to Zook, Cat Crap, etc. It was hydrophobic, so that condensation would form but roll off just as quickly. 

post #11 of 24

+1 for Smith turbo fan goggles, but with RX inserts.

 

LiquidFeet is correct about the moisture, others about the overheating.

 

Another issue is the temperature varient between the goggle lens and the glasses lenses. This is exacerbated when you pull your goggles off your face to go inside or because they're fogged. Once you put the goggles down over your glasses, leave them there if you can. Each time you put them on top of your helmet but your glasses stay on your warm face, it gets worse. That's why the insterted lenses work better; they stay attached to the goggle.

post #12 of 24

Fogtech anti fog works pretty good but doesn't last too long.. I recently found a clear anti fog tape that helps prevent the area from fogging.. I bought mine on amazon.  Its called fogstops .. I think I also saw it at my local REI as well

post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by shreddedice View Post

Fogtech anti fog works pretty good but doesn't last too long.. I recently found a clear anti fog tape that helps prevent the area from fogging.. I bought mine on amazon.  Its called fogstops .. I think I also saw it at my local REI as well

 

I will remark again that my opinion is if you are resorting to using anti-fog on your actual ski goggles, you have already ruined the lenses, perhaps by wiping or rubbing them. Since basically all modern ski goggles have anti-fog built in, which does not require any aftermarket product, and should outperform the aftermarket product as well.

 

If you are using it on glasses inside your OTG goggles, that's another story.

post #14 of 24
My want to try shampo,rub in and let dry a few than buff out clear.Hockeyplayers use for half masks.Works pretty good lasts most of game,cheap too
post #15 of 24

It may sound nasty, but saliva is an effective anti fog solution.  Best part is that it is free and always readily available. 

 

 

Quote:

How does Spit work in Defogging a Scuba Mask

 

One of the first things we are taught while learning to scuba dive is how to spit in our masks before entering the water to prevent the mask from fogging up underwater. Yes some of us have graduated to using baby shampoo or other commercially available defogging agents, but the most widely used and most easily available solution to a foggy mask is the good ‘ol fashioned spit and rub of the insides of your dive mask.

 

 

So how does Spit help in defogging a mask? Saliva acts as a surfactant. Surfactants are wetting agents that lower the surface tension of a liquid, allowing easier spreading. Surfactants prevent water droplet formation and cause the water to break up and spread easily. The term surfactant is a blend of the words surface acting agent. As a surfactant; saliva decreases the surface tension of the droplets. The water from the condensation does not mound up as beads or droplets but, instead breaks to form bigger droplets that just roll away into the mask. So the water condensation on the insides of the mask don’t adhere to the glass but instead break up and roll down into the mask itself, giving the scuba diver clear vision.

 

http://aquaviews.net/scuba-guides/spit-work-defogging-scuba-mask-2/#

Just sayin' I wasn't joking.


Edited by crgildart - 3/27/13 at 1:53pm
post #16 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

I found the best thing ever to regulate my fogging is to regulate my body temperature. Most people dress too warm as it is.
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzledVeteran View Post

Usually the fogging is due to your exhaled breath, or the heat coming up through the chimney opening at the top of your jacket (where it's zipped up near your neck). Sometimes if you're dressed a bit too warmly it's worse.

 

These two posts contain major help.

post #17 of 24

.. and if you ever fall down and get snow in your goggles,SHAKE, DON'T WIPE, the snow out. Wiping it smears water all over the lens. You'll still be screwed though, as now you have moisture behind the google and it'll fog. But if you shake / tap the snow out, you'll stand a chance of some sections not fogging up. IF you carry your anti-fog cloth or stuff with you, reapply asap.

post #18 of 24

If you want to stick with glasses, I've heard the OSBE helmet with integrated visor (http://www.epicski.com/t/74404/osbe-helmet-with-visor-glasses) works even better than the Smith Turbo Fan.  Many glasses-wearers rave about it.

 

However, personally, I'd urge you to try contacts. I don't like skiing with glasses under my goggles, because of (1) fogging; (2) lack of peripheral vision; and (3) more to clean up in a fall.  Further, with contacts, when it gets warm I can remove the goggles and switch to nice non-prescription wrap-arounds.  With glasses, I'd have to instead switch to prescription sunglasses, which don't afford that nice wrap, and its attendant wind and sun protection (generally one doesn't want to make a prescription with a base curve greater than 6 because of optical distortion, while wrap-arounds are typically >=8).

 

I'd recommend trying the one-day disposables.  They're quite convenient.  And if the first couple of sets the optometrist gives aren't comfortable, ask to try more --  I know of seven different models, and they can vary considerably in comfort.  Or if those aren't comfortable, go for the regular soft contacts, like the Biofinity.  They're not as convenient as the one-day disposables, because you have to clean them, but are typically even more comfortable.  At least it's worth a try.

post #19 of 24

I'll push your recommendation one step further.  Lasik (if you are a suitable candidate).

There are other threads on this, and there are risks and cons that you should consider.  

But in terms of overall net eye health, even though they suffered the trauma of getting lasered, my eyes feel healthier and less irritated as compared to when I was sticking a piece of plastic on them with various amount of debris for 15hours/day for years.

post #20 of 24
I have the same issue. When I get fogged up, I lift the bottom half of my goggles up slightly to let cool air flow in to clear, it solves it for a few seconds, but that's usually all the time I need or I'll do it again. Yeah it's not a real solution but I don't think there really is one unless someone makes a goggle with defrosting fans. Is there such a thing?
post #21 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by jL19 View Post

I have the same issue. When I get fogged up, I lift the bottom half of my goggles up slightly to let cool air flow in to clear, it solves it for a few seconds, but that's usually all the time I need or I'll do it again. Yeah it's not a real solution but I don't think there really is one unless someone makes a goggle with defrosting fans. Is there such a thing?

Answered in post #3 of this thread.

post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

Resurrecting an old thread here - wound up for the last couple of years just going without my glasses when skiing - could still see well enough to get by without difficulty.  Finally this year thought I'd better get to work on this.  Short answer - picked up the Smith Knowledge Turbo fan goggles and they did the trick.  Would have to say that they aren't perfect - still get a bit of fogging and have to up the fan to the max setting most of the time when I stop to rest or wait for the wife, but, unlike my Giro's, I don't have to put the goggles up every time! Not crazy about the constant buzz, but it's liveable.

post #23 of 24

I got the Smith Turbo goggles this year.  They work well.

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tag View Post
 

Resurrecting an old thread here - wound up for the last couple of years just going without my glasses when skiing - could still see well enough to get by without difficulty.  Finally this year thought I'd better get to work on this.  Short answer - picked up the Smith Knowledge Turbo fan goggles and they did the trick.  Would have to say that they aren't perfect - still get a bit of fogging and have to up the fan to the max setting most of the time when I stop to rest or wait for the wife, but, unlike my Giro's, I don't have to put the goggles up every time! Not crazy about the constant buzz, but it's liveable.


Not sure if you are using them over your glasses, but with the Smith inserts, mine almost never fog. Never need to use the High setting unless I'm really breathing hard into my gator. If I do use the high setting it's just for a few seconds.

 

BTW, throw a spare battery in a jacket pocket. Finding a AAA battery at a ski area isn't always easy. I've left the fan on at the end of a ski day too many times only to find out a week later at the beginning of a new ski day.

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