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Ski wax-temp question.

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Well, Yea! Local hill opens, great snow. Four to five foot base of fresh to three day old snow! And my skis were waxed up with quality general purpose wax (28*-40* range-great 80%of the time).

 

But...it was coldish today and will be tomorrow, by CA standards. Teens at the hill warming up to maybe 30. Needless to say my skis did not perform all that well, kinda sticky, hardish to turn-got better afte noon. This happens now and then when the air temp is in the low to mid 20s.

 

 Within the hour I am rewaxing my skis with an 18*-28* wax.

 

So my question is: if it should warm up to the low 30s will my skis not do so good? I know I should just not worry about it, but my inquiring mind wants to know. Kind of a general purpose question. I do plan to use colder snow waxes as needed.

post #2 of 4

These wax threads get crazy since you get 10- 15 people answering each question with 20-25 answers.   It seems everyone has a favorite brand or wax combination.  I am certainly no wax expert but found two great all purpose waxes that work for me, and "extend" their range with temperature specific graphite wax only when the temps are at the extreme ranges.  I am sure others have their own waxes or combinations that work as well.  I just don't think it is necessary to worry about waxing for each degree change in temperature, figuring all that temperature specific, overlay, and flouro powder stuff is for WC racers and not for me.  The Hertel FC739 is a relatively hard multipurpose wax that does its best in the twenties.  It isn't the cheapest out there, but it is hard (pain in the ass to scrape) and lasts a really long time.  The other wax is a low fluoro TOKO shop/training wax.  ARTech sells a 250g brick or it for only $12, which is an amazing price because it works great in a variety of Lake Tahoe and Utah conditions and temps (the flouro works in the wet and can't hurt in the bone dry).  I skied Heavenly today, and had the same cold morning and warmer afternoon conditions you did.  I stuck the Hertel wax on my skis since I didn't travel with an iron and figured the wax would last the duration of the trip.  It did and the skis worked just fine throughout the day.   

post #3 of 4
I've been going by - cold wax works in warm weather but not the opposite - so when in doubt, go cold. It's harder to work with and usually costs more, but you won't have to re-wax. You don't have to always use the cold but you can wax for the coldest part of the day and will be good for the entire day.

You can also mix and match. Do something like drip an all purpose wax on the ski and then drip a cold wax along the edges or even mix it in all over. The thing to remember is that if you add a cold wax to a warmer one, you end up with a warm + or cold -, depending on how you think of things. So you won't get the full range of the cold wax but you'll get a bigger temperature range to the cold side than the warm alone.

Ken
post #4 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

I've been going by - cold wax works in warm weather but not the opposite - so when in doubt, go cold. It's harder to work with and usually costs more, but you won't have to re-wax. You don't have to always use the cold but you can wax for the coldest part of the day and will be good for the entire day.
You can also mix and match. Do something like drip an all purpose wax on the ski and then drip a cold wax along the edges or even mix it in all over. The thing to remember is that if you add a cold wax to a warmer one, you end up with a warm + or cold -, depending on how you think of things. So you won't get the full range of the cold wax but you'll get a bigger temperature range to the cold side than the warm alone.
Ken

Thanks,

 

This is the answer I was looking for.

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