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HELP... i want to finally purachase my first pair of skis and don't know where to start!!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I live in Texas but take 1-2 ski trips every year all over the world and figured its about time to invest in some skis instead of renting all the time. I would say I am an advanced level skier, 5'7" and 180lbs, but I like short skis and even blades for the better control and navigating through moguls and such. I also enjoy going through the wooded areas and being more aggressive than the average tourist skier. I need the boots, the bindings, and the skis. Where do I begin!? The prices online at most places are so high on these things I would like to limit it all for less than $400 or $500. Is that possible? I don't need the top of the line stuff, just something that looks slick and does the job. If I don't buy blades, I would like to buy skis that are shorter than my height for sure. Suggestions? Thanks for the help.
post #2 of 9

Welcome to EpicSki!  You'll find plenty of Texans around.  A good place to start are the EpicSki First Run Articles (click on Articles on the menu bar).  Includes basics for buyings skis and boots.

 

For travelers, one option is to invest in good boots by working with a boot fitter in a reputable ski shop and rent skis.  Even though I have good skis, sometimes I leave them at home and just bring my boots because the skis aren't suited to the likely snow conditions.  Even when I have them, if there is a powder dump then I rent powder skis.


Where did you go last season?

post #3 of 9

Take your entire budget and spend it on boots. Go to a resort with a top notch boot fitter, continue to rent skis, but not standard rentals, get the performance demo skis.

 

I don't want to sound like too much of a critic, but you rate yourself as an advanced skier, so you need to know that real advanced skiers do not ski on snowblades, they don't even ski with people who use them, mostly because the snowblader won't be able to keep up.

post #4 of 9

Since I see you've had the boot lecture, if/when you want to get skis used slalom skis might be a good place to look. The downside is that they can be demanding in terms of your alignment/balance fore and aft. But they are clearly IMO the snow blade's closest relative on the ski side of the genetic divide. They are also stiff skis so that is a downside in bumps. Unless on the feet of a real expert, they are not great for any off piste skiing and not good for powder. But they do have definite upsides - they are fast to turn, they hold a tight turn and really let you lay over a turn and fun. I think they are a great training tool just because they are demanding.  the SL do best on piste. Also, on the economic front, you can find a several year old slalom ski pretty cheap (way less than 400) (racers tend to get new gear pretty often) that would still be in good condition. If you go that route look for a non-FIS, recreational racer type of ski. The lengths are 155 and 165. The 155s in addition to being shorter will tend to be a bit softer than the 165s as 155 is the length women SL racers use. As for looking slick, I'll leave that to your eye.


Edited by vsirin - 12/24/12 at 7:30am
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

thanks for your help y'all.  last year i skied in new zealand on the north island down the ruapehu volcano.  i mostly ski all over the US/canada, like whistler, vail, breck/key, tahoe, taos, etc.  i think i might take the advice of just buying boots and renting skis here and there for now and then perhaps later look at purchasing the actual skis, its just hard to find a boot fitter in texas.  thanks forthe help.
 

post #6 of 9

Although not ideal, it's possible to buy boots during a ski trip.  One of my ski buddies had to last season at Big Sky because his ancient boots finally cracked.  He was pretty happy with the selection and service.  There were two shops in the base village to choose from, plus another one in the valley.  Expected to lose much of the day for the boot fitting but was on the slopes in just over an hour.  He needed a little tweaking during his next ski trip to Alta, which the Deep Powder Haus was happy to help with.

post #7 of 9

As bad as this sounds, up you boot budget a bit.  While you can get really good deals, if you know what your looking for (if you don't need a boot fitter and are willing to take the risk of money wasted), go to a good shop and get what you need (which is not always what you want or want to spend) and ensure that they will fit it well for you.  Don't forget you spend good dollars to go on holidays, might as well have happy feet on the holiday or suffer the consequences.

 

I would ask the "boot guys" for the best shop in the area you are going to next and set up an appointment there or even better forgo on ski-cation and get the best equipment you can get at the best shop.

 

My 2cents

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

Although not ideal, it's possible to buy boots during a ski trip.  One of my ski buddies had to last season at Big Sky because he's ancient boots finally cracked.  He was pretty happy with the selection and service.  There were two shops in the base village to choose from, plus another one in the valley.  Expected to lose much of the day for the boot fitting but was on the slopes in just over an hour.  He needed a little tweaking during his next ski trip to Alta, which the Deep Powder Haus was happy to help with.

Been there done that, Don't get the perfect boot, but close enough that I don't change it for 18 years, once you got what works why change.  This time I looked and found my ideal boot, ne tweaking or tuning required at all.  My search was done from the only shop in town at the time between getting of the slopes and dinner...Don't leave a lot of choice and does limit selection,

post #9 of 9

I'd also recommend planning your boot fitter visit at the very beginning of the trip which will allow the tweeking of the boots and fit after you've used them for a day or two. It sometimes takes 2 or 3 visits to get the fit perfected.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › HELP... i want to finally purachase my first pair of skis and don't know where to start!!