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Are 15 year old skiis & bindings that are in great shape safe..??

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Yesterday I bough a pair of Elan MBX Lighspeed 203cm skis with Salomon 977 bindings for next to nothing.

Skis & binds have very little (apparent) use.  A few small dings on top but the ski bottoms are near perfect.

 

Question; I am an advanced skiier getting back on the slopes after 25 years away from the sport.

 

Should I trust these old skis and bindings, or should I look for newer gear..??

 

A problem I have had the past 2 years is that rental gear seems to be too short (am (6' 7") and too slow on the slopes. 

 

Thanks, Bob in Kansas City.

post #2 of 13
post #3 of 13

i think the rental gear issue is a factor of your particular rental shop.

 

If it is a high end demo, for which you are paying the top $ to rent.  They should have plenty of new skis, with great glide.  This being the very beginning of the season, you can even expect to take out new 2013skis  that hasn't even been on the slopes yet and are as good as you can get.    If the shop doesn't have some shiny new skis, either you need to break out your wallet for them to show you the the nicer demo gear, or time to visit a different shop.  

 

But yes, you are extremely tall at 6'7" so I can understand maybe you have very limited selection.

 

As far as speed, this maybe  a factor of the waxing they do (or didn't do); and maybe combined with slight imperfections of your technique, maybe in the last 25 years you picked up a cant or something in your feet and the skis are slightly tilted.

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

Ray,

 

You may be right concerning the rental shop.

Last year, after the 1st day of skiing, I went back to the shop and asked for the tallest, best rental ski, paid a bit more and bought some wax.

That helped.

Part of my problem is that I may be comparing the very long and stiff boards I had to the newer softer parabolic shapes.

So, my fix for that is to try going back to the older skis, with this cherry old Elan / Salomon combo.

My fear is that when I get on the slope with these things, something may go wrong and I will lose slope time swapping the old for the new.

Will probably rent and put these Elan's on Craigslist.

 

Bob... 

post #5 of 13

since you have the skis, go ahead and take the skis up for a day. just ease into it and don't immediately go hit the doubleblack /skull+crossbones runs where falling=death.

 

Maybe they'll be what you want!  

There's always some old guy in the lift line the straight skis in the lift line that everyone stares at for a bit.

 

Especially since they are the skis you are used to, you may be familiar with the straight-ski techniques to hotdog pivot instead of tipping the skis and having the shape turn the ski for you.

 

If you are set on renting, I'd suggest to take a look at the skis that have full rocker, as this will be more familiar to get into, while you learn the carved turn. Perhaps the Volkl rtm84 would be a match to your old school technique.  It has a top size is 181cm-still short, but it is beefy.   It should also be widely available in the demo rental shops, and is a season old.


It still may take you a day or two to figure things out, but having the full rocker will help ease you into trying the tipping to turn rather than pivoting.  This is what worked my friend who also was a straight-ski skier.

 

Anyway, i'm still a noob and the experts over in the ski training area will have better advice on technique than I can provide.  And if it's a good rental shop, they can give better advice based on what they have.

post #6 of 13

Which Salomon 977 is the million dollar question.  I would be hesitant truly skiing a set of composite plastic 977's on anything that I would not be ok with ejecting at any moment if they were to fail.  The metal equipes I'm much more comfortable with, in fact, I have a set of 997 equipes mounted on a set of Obsethed.

 

I also have a set of all metal 957 Equipes that I would still mount if I had a ski that needed them.

 

On the other hand, I wouldn't click into a set of composite 747 or 957's.

 

That said, you would be doing yourself a favor to buying a shaped ski. I was slow to the revolution, but skiing straight skis is solely a nostalgia piece for me these days.
 

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

Which Salomon 977 is the million dollar question.  I would be hesitant truly skiing a set of composite plastic 977's on anything that I would not be ok with ejecting at any moment if they were to fail.  The metal equipes I'm much more comfortable with, in fact, I have a set of 997 equipes mounted on a set of Obsethed.

 

 

They usually blow when you're stepping in, not when you're actually skiing on them.  Ski the 203's.  Bring the rentals just in case.

post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

Excatly what I will probably do; bring the old skis to CO, rent skis, and do the 1st run with the old Elan's.

If I like them, the rentals are returned at the end of the day.

If they don't work, I set them near a trash barrel and use the rentals.

I paid $6.42 for the skis and poles so no great loss.

 

Thanks for the responses.

See you on the slopes..!!!

 

Bob...

 

edit; last year I skiied Winter Park and rode up a lift next to a guy who had a nice pair of old K2's. 

He said he keeps an eye on Craigslist and looks for seldom used better quality older straight skis every few years.

Made me think I could do the same.

We'll see.

 


Edited by Bob in Missouri - 12/21/12 at 5:32pm
post #9 of 13

Have the bindings checked for release values at a shop--they put your boots in the binding and measure the force it takes to release and make sure it agrees with the DIN setting of the binding.  If they tell you the binding is no longer indemnified that means that the manufacturer will no longer pay a claim if someone is injured with  that binding which means the shop has to pay which means they won't touch the binding which means don't use them.  As far as the skis Squaw Valley demo shop actually rents old long straight skis--I think so people can realize how much better the new gear is, or maybe there are a few old timers who insist.  Do yourself a favor and get modern equipment.  You'll have more fun, I guarantee it. (But don't start with a full rocker ski--those are for powder, not learning how to carve.  These days an all mountain ski usually has some rocker in the tip and standard camber underfoot. For out west probably something over 90 cm under foot. The wider skis tend to come in longer lengths as well.) 

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Have the bindings checked for release values at a shop--they put your boots in the binding and measure the force it takes to release and make sure it agrees with the DIN setting of the binding.  If they tell you the binding is no longer indemnified that means that the manufacturer will no longer pay a claim if someone is injured with  that binding which means the shop has to pay which means they won't touch the binding which means don't use them. 

977s don't appear to be on the indemnified list..

post #11 of 13

977s are indeed off the indemnification list.  You can find a binding like an Marker m10 or Tyrolia SL100 for under $100, but at that point you're kind of throwing good money after bad.

post #12 of 13

I still ski a pair of 977 Composites-on my eek.gif BUMP skis.  But, I always bring 2 pairs of skis to the mountain in case conditions change or I have an equipment failure.  Honestly, I haven't seen a 977 blow (yet). I've seen several of the previous plastic heels of various brands explode just like that video.  It isn't subtle, and it usually happens when stepping in.  You'll know when it happens!  It doesn't really surprise me if a 15+ year old plastic anything fails.  Plastics degrade over time. 


Edited by crgildart - 12/22/12 at 6:55am
post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

Which Salomon 977 is the million dollar question.  I would be hesitant truly skiing a set of composite plastic 977's on anything that I would not be ok with ejecting at any moment if they were to fail.  The metal equipes I'm much more comfortable with, in fact, I have a set of 997 equipes mounted on a set of Obsethed.

 

I also have a set of all metal 957 Equipes that I would still mount if I had a ski that needed them.

 

On the other hand, I wouldn't click into a set of composite 747 or 957's.

 

That said, you would be doing yourself a favor to buying a shaped ski. I was slow to the revolution, but skiing straight skis is solely a nostalgia piece for me these days.
 

I couldn't have said this better.

 

Now on to the skis...Those Lightspeeds were, well an interesting ski. While they said the were 203's, they were actually closer to a 207-208. At 6'7", you are a big boy...what is it lately with all these big guys finding Epicski?...there are a couple of recent threads here regarding skis for big guys, take a look in them for suggestions. As far as modern skis being too slow...even in the speed events, racers are skiing shorter skis now than they did 15 years ago, a current slalom ski in now is a 165 vs a 205 and Giant Slalom skis are 195 vs the old 215's. 

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