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Returning to skiing after a long layoff and need advice

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I just returned to skiing last year after a long layoff because I needed to keep an eye on my 8 year old who just started snowboarding last year.  Seems in the 12 years or so that I had not skied, technology changed quite a bit.

 

I quit skiing back in the late 90s due to a knee injury while playing hockey.  Was basically afraid to make it worse.  Got out there on rentals last year 5 or 6 times and all was well.  I decided to get season passes for me and my son this year as we live 5 minutes from a little place in the Poconos and will be able to go after school and evenings during the week.

 

I'm 6'3" and ~235 lbs

Intermediate advanced skier.  I used to be an aggressive skier but age and fitness seem to have eroded that a bit.  Mostly just cruising now and pretty much on groomed trails. ;)

I'm in NE PA and will be doing a fair bit of night skiing.  I expect ice, slush and if we are lucky, the occasional snowfall.

I have poles and boots which I used with rentals last year and they are in good shape.  Just looking for some new skis without breaking the bank.

 

Any recommendations?  I'm not even sure where to start.

post #2 of 6

I ski under the same conditions as you do (night, ice).  I prefer frontside carver skis, and I like them a little longer for having longer edges for biting in the ice and not skidding.

 

I have purchased several cheater GS skis, i.e. skis made for frontside carving but having a shorter radius (15-18m) than real competition GS skis.

 

I also have shorter, lightweight intermediate skis that I use when it's snowy and I just feel like cruising and not pushing the envelope too much.  Actually I had purchased that intermediate pair of skis for springtime conditions in order to spare my beloved GS skis from the rocks and other debris we ski on when the snow cover is less than ideal.  I was surprised at how much fun I could have with these cheaper skis, in the bumps, in the woods, and just having fun all around the mountain.  It served me as a reminder that sometimes the fun is not always proportional to the price you pay for your gadgets.

 

Sierra Jim pretty much nailed it with his description of all mountain frontsider skis:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/109358/whats-becoming-of-the-frontside-ski

post #3 of 6

rn,

 

In a similar situation here.  Advanced skiier getting back into it after 25 years off the slopes.

Have rented gear the past few years but have not been happy with what the rental shops call the longest skis they can give me.

Am 6' 7" and 230 lbs.

Back in the day I had long stiff GS skis that werestiff & fast, but a bit hard to turn.

The new parabolic shapes are easy to turn, but am not finding the speed.

Not wanting to hurt myself (one of the reasons i gave up  the sport) maybe I should be happy with the shorter, softer rentals..??

 

Bob...

post #4 of 6

A couple of suggestions form the front side carving category.

Fischer WC RC or Fischer WC SC if you like shorter turns.

Atomic D2 Race GS

Head I. Speed or Supershape Speed

The above are on the stiffer end of recreational skis, and suitable for hard snow (not powder and not particularly well suited to bumps.  (but a heck of a lot better than my old SG skis).

 

Also suggest you subscribe to realskiers.com and check out the reviews that go back a few years and think about buying used or buying a never used but not yet sold left-over from previous years.

 

 

@Bob, if you want stiffer skis but with the benefit of more shape than days gone by, they still make GS racing skis (even the Atomic D2 "Race" GS mentioned above is not a real GS racing ski; you can tell by the side cut radius)  and you might find some used racing GS skis for cheap because FIS keeps changing the rules (changing minimum sidecut radius from 21 to 23 then 27) so that the skis become obsolete and have to be sold off at a good price.

post #5 of 6

Ghost,

 

Thanks for the advice.

As I only ski a few days per season, since I started skiing again, I have decided to rent instead of buy.

 

Appreciate all the good advice here...!!

Nice forum..

 

Bob...

post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob in Missouri View Post

Ghost,

 

Thanks for the advice.

As I only ski a few days per season, since I started skiing again, I have decided to rent instead of buy.

 

Appreciate all the good advice here...!!

Nice forum..

 

Bob...


For a few days a year, renting is the cheaper option and has the benefit that your equipment is up to date and the best available if you rent the good stuff (they call them demos biggrin.gif).  The big advantage of having your own equipment is the convenience of just throwing your gear in the car and going; when you get there you only need to get a lift ticket and put on your stuff.   What you don't want to do is waste an hour of your skiing time getting kitted up in a rental line up at the hill.  The other big advantage is you have boots that really fit if you've done it right, but we were talking about skis here.  If you can rent ahead of time (say the night before your weekend trip for example), that is better.

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