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Skiing at twilight is difficult

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

So last night I took a fairly hard crash (almost 2!) due to the difficulty I had seeing the surface of the snow around 4:15pm.

 

I have to say I haven't skied right at twilight in quite some time, it's usually either fully daylite of fully dark with artificial light when I ski, and man was that tough to ski in.

 

I couldn't make out the undulations of the snow at all.   The first black I took was throwing me all over the place and all I could do was hang on and get to the bottom.  

 

As soon as it was fully dark it was super easy to see the surfaces again and everything was fine.  

 

Anyone have any ideas on how to lessen this problem?   My goggles tint did help some, but not a whole lot.

post #2 of 20

yellow's always worked the best for me in low-light conditions - early, late, overcast.

post #3 of 20

Cyborg implants.

 

Sorry .... that's all I got.

post #4 of 20

It is what it is IMO. A good time to do some waltzing on the blue groomers or slow down, practice survival mode skiing and get a good work out.

post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post

It is what it is IMO. A good time to do some waltzing on the blue groomers or slow down, practice survival mode skiing and get a good work out.

 

That's exactly what I did after my crash...   Took it easy for another 20 minutes and then things were fine.  I want to get a few more pair of goggles so I have some tint options...

post #6 of 20

Maybe I'm a bit of an over-prepared gear nerd, but I always have an extra pair of goggles in my pack. Typically using my goggles with the dark tinted lenses for daytime and switching to my yellow tinted goggles when the sun starts going down or the clouds or fog come around. Makes a BIG difference. However, usually by the end of the day, my muscles are pretty well done and I just start taking it easy, cruising groomers, working on my technique (if you can call it that).

 

Seriously, though. Try out different lenses. I'm thinking the spherical lenses (like both of mine are) might make a difference too. Can more tech savvy people bears here confirm that?

post #7 of 20

Some discussion here

 

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/256031-Low-Light-Storm-Goggle-Recco-s?highlight=sensor

 

I need glasses TO FIND my glasses in the morning so any low light relief I get is marginal. Yellow seems to work "better" for me. Now, what goggle to use for low light, inside a ping pong ball fog and freezing rain coating the goggles? On a super mellow run in those conditions last year I though I had stopped at trail side but I was still sliding.redface.gif

post #8 of 20
I bought a clear lens for my Smith IOS for twilight and night skiing.

That, and slow down when I can't see anything.
post #9 of 20

Funny, I experienced this for the first time also my 3rd time out this season. Things almost took a turn for the worse when I ate it, almost went into the woods... I still had a bright conditions lens in though, not the best idea.

 

Best option is to dial it back

post #10 of 20

Many is the skier who has fallen victim to "flat light", myself included.   Orange tint helps bring out the contrast (remember the Scott Tint adds?).   Having longer skis helps with recoveries too.

post #11 of 20

How about dragging your poles, they help like whiskers, feelers to help with balance.

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

Maybe I'm a bit of an over-prepared gear nerd, but I always have an extra pair of goggles in my pack.

 

+1

My eyesight is not perfect so I carry 3 goggles with me. I usually switch to a light tint (light red) at about 2 to 3 depending on the overcast/sun situation and then to clear at about 4 or so. I've tried lots of yellows but the light transmission just isn't good enough for my eyes.

post #13 of 20

4pm is probably the time most ski injuries occur, right at sunset, but before the lights are casting shadows.  Flat light is a major contributor.  There is also another factor here, fatigue!  After a long day if hitting ot hard folks legs are often burned out and noodled legs hitting eek.gif washboard bumps that flat light camouflages doesn't end well. Best solution, don't take that "one more run".  Better yet, go inside and have some supper, rest for an hour while the lights warm up. then go tear it up for a couple more hours..

post #14 of 20

I'm still striving to become a low intermediate, so take my advice for what it's worth, but here goes: When the light goes flat, make sure you are constantly linking turns. It's much easier to react to an unseen dip or bump if your skis are already edged. Straight running on flat skis leaves you much more vulnerable to terrain surprises.

post #15 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

I bought a clear lens for my Smith IOS for twilight and night skiing.
That, and slow down when I can't see anything.

+1. Same here.

post #16 of 20

Solution: stop for cocktail hour at twilight.  Resume after dark.  Or not.  

post #17 of 20

I used to work the 24 Hours of Aspen race.  The flattest light was always at dusk and dawn, when we would pine bow the couse.

 

 

If you ever get the chance to ski  powder a under the full moon, take it.  Amazing experience!

post #18 of 20

Yellow lenses work best in flat light.  Amazingly, looking through yellow lenses (also known as blue-blockers) increases the contrast between the lit-up side and the shadow side of dips and bumps.  

I have always believed that the increased contrast has something to do with how the brain processes yellow compared to other colors.

post #19 of 20

I just bought a pair of scotts with the lens color "Night Amplifier."  It is a greyish blue.  Have not tried under the lights yet.  Soon.

 

Otherwise, I like yellow for nght and twilight.

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post

I'm still striving to become a low intermediate, so take my advice for what it's worth, but here goes: When the light goes flat, make sure you are constantly linking turns. It's much easier to react to an unseen dip or bump if your skis are already edged. Straight running on flat skis leaves you much more vulnerable to terrain surprises.

Yes, first drag your poles, then follow someone, right behind them, or if you have to go first, continually turn, turn,turn...you don't have to see to ski.

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