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Skiing crud

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Does anyone have any technique videos on how to ski crud. I am out in snowbird and don't have a lot of issues skiing powder or bumps, but heavy chopped up crud after a big dump seems to he hardest. I can't seem to glide through it like powder or smear turns for bumps. What should I be focusing on
post #2 of 17


 

post #3 of 17
post #4 of 17
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Thanks but I feel pretty good in those conditions I am talking about steeper and heavier crud, like a day after a dump on the cirque at snowbird
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFull View Post

Thanks but I feel pretty good in those conditions I am talking about steeper and heavier crud, like a day after a dump on the cirque at snowbird

 

You didn't find anything the "Crudology Revisited" thread / video that was meaningful?

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by TFull View Post
... heavy chopped up crud after a big dump seems to he hardest. I can't seem to glide through it like powder or smear turns for bumps.

I also thought that most of the images in the Crudology video were of tame conditions, but the narration is good.  If the crud is truly heavy (we always hear that Snowbird has nothing but the lightest snow) then you won't "glide" through it no matter what.  Expect a jerky, lumpy ride.  Smearing heavy crud often doesn't work so well, try carving. 

 

Be aggressive in your attitude and attack the snow.  Get it before it gets you.

post #8 of 17

stiff heavy damp skis and fairly high speed skiing with definite up unweight.  (didn't see the clips, just my exp from the Sierra)

 

in general, if the crud is set up and deep, many skiers would do well to skip it, because of the wear and tear on the knees and the possibility of a muscle tear or sprained ligament.

post #9 of 17

I have found that pressure the tips to drive them through rather than over works for me.  Definitely stay out of the backseat, of course.  Is this one situation where a very wide ski and rocker might be a hindrance--depends on the snow I guess--sometimes it's better to go over, sometimes through.

post #10 of 17

No video, but a suggestion.  I try to ski crud loose.  You know you are going to get thrown around so don't fight it.  The more you fight it the harder it seems to get.  Yes, speed in moderation can be your friend and wider GS type turns rather than shorter turns which will wear you out very quickly in heavier crud.  Allow lots of room for stopping just like in deep powder. A big part of skiing crud is mental.  Trust your instincts and your skis.

 

Rick G

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I have found that pressure the tips to drive them through rather than over works for me.  Definitely stay out of the backseat, of course.  Is this one situation where a very wide ski and rocker might be a hindrance--depends on the snow I guess--sometimes it's better to go over, sometimes through.

 

I have a fairly slim rockered ski.  I was just practicing in crud today and it seemed for me to go as fast as I can and skim the tops of the ruts was the way to go.  A guy on fat boards passed me like he was on water skis just plowing right through everything.  Definitely seems like you can attack it multiple ways depending on your equipment and knee strength.

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

sorry man i didnt see that video at first, yes that was very helpful
 

post #13 of 17

A method I use in crud.  No park and ride when you finish a turn immediately start the next, no static ride not even a little short one.

post #14 of 17

Cruddy tip # 4: don't look (stare) at all the cruddy snow just in front of your ski tips. You can't avoid it or deal with it all anyhow. Keep your eyes up and moving ahead.  You could still catch a tip, but probably not.

post #15 of 17

I think of it as your body mirroring the snow.  The thicker the snow the more compact your body needs to be.  Skis stay fairly close together, knees stay a little more bent and body lower.  Angulate and push your turning ski down into the crud.  You need to ski it with almost all of your body weight on the turning ski.  Get on it early and ride it around.  It takes focus and an attitude that you are not going to be pushed around.  Start with slow GS turns until you get the feel of the snow. It is like someone has a gun pointed at you, don't make any sudden moves.

post #16 of 17

Keep turning.  It is harder to start a turn from a traverse than at the end of a turn, there is energy loaded into your skis and body that is lost when your skis are running straight.

 

 If you can see your tips, you are not looking far enough ahead. Looking down tends to move you into the backseat.  Same is true for not being able to see your hands.

 

Don't over think snow conditions, ski them . Experience comes from doing not thinking.   People tend to psych themselves out of things way more than they psych themselves into things.  

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

 Get on it early and ride it around. 

 

Focused on this very thing at Jane yesterday.  They had some of the C-lift runs open and they weren't fully bumped yet... just steep, off-camber lumps of crud.  Getting on the downhill ski early was the key to predictable, smooth turning.

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