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Time to upgrade the one ski quiver

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Me:

52 year old guy, 5'7" and 180lb with junk knees

New Hampshire skier who almost never ventures outside New England

Advanced skier, nearly all on-piste (steep groomers = good, bumps = not so much) but getting tired of fighting the crud and the (rare) foray into the glades

Ski 15 days a year plus or minus on older Fischer Red Heat 165s, 74mm underfoot and I stick to a one ski quiver

 

So... finding myself struggling too much when the crud piles up on the groomers and I founder when there's even a half-foot or so of powder. Demo'ed a couple of skis last weekend but not sure how I felt about them and looking for suggestions.

 

Tried:

  • Head Rev 80 in 170, nice and float-y (is that a word?) in the crud but a little tough to initiate on the hardpack or at slower speeds coming off my old Fischers.
  • Fischer Motive 86 in 168, just couldn't get comfortable, felt like I was on a skateboard at lower speeds and in hardpack (and I don't ride!).
  • Fischer Motive 80 in 168, much more comfortable than the 86, very nice in the crud but not much to distinguish it from the Head and had the odd sensation of fighting the tails at low speed, could have just been the tune or the fact that it was late in the day but definitely wasn't sitting back on them.

 

So given that my goal is just to ride through the crud, mashed potatoes and the very rare spot of powder a bit more comfortably without burning my tired old legs out trying to initiate turns, any suggestions? TIA!

post #2 of 14

Your commentary on the models that you skied is a little hard to dechipher but it sounds suspiciously like poor tuning on those demos as none of those are bad skis. IAC......it sounds to my eye as if you would be a candidate for a K2 Rictor or Aftershock. Both are very comfortable skis for almost anyone. These are both medium soft, damp, and easygoing but both have reasonable edge grip and are nicely stable. While sometimes vilified as non aggressive skis, the fact is that there are skiers who can benefit from that. Either model is a great choice for a competent skier who does not charge all the time nor eat "gnar" sprinkled with barbed wire for breakfast. If a wider (87mm) ski fits into your picture, the Dynastar Outland 87 is exceptionally versatile and a little more aggressive than the K2s.

 

SJ 
 

post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

Your commentary on the models that you skied is a little hard to dechipher but it sounds suspiciously like poor tuning on those demos as none of those are bad skis. IAC......it sounds to my eye as if you would be a candidate for a K2 Rictor or Aftershock. Both are very comfortable skis for almost anyone. These are both medium soft, damp, and easygoing but both have reasonable edge grip and are nicely stable. While sometimes vilified as non aggressive skis, the fact is that there are skiers who can benefit from that. Either model is a great choice for a competent skier who does not charge all the time nor eat "gnar" sprinkled with barbed wire for breakfast. If a wider (87mm) ski fits into your picture, the Dynastar Outland 87 is exceptionally versatile and a little more aggressive than the K2s.

 

SJ 
 

 

Jim,

You sure have a way with words.  May I sprinkle my "gnar" with cinnamon also?

 

D.

post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny1969 View Post

 

Jim,

You sure have a way with words.  May I sprinkle my "gnar" with cinnamon also?

 

D.

 

Yeah...............but...........Broken glass and sour milk is really tastier. BTW......are you sure that you sure that you don't wanna live in the mountainz?

 

SJ

post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

 

Yeah...............but...........Broken glass and sour milk is really tastier. BTW......are you sure that you sure that you don't wanna live in the mountainz?

 

SJ

 

Would Owens Corning R-13 count?

 

On a serious note, life is good down here.

 

D.

post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the reply SJ. I have a hard time articulating my demo results because I've never really acquired even a superficial understanding of the mechanics of the ski. I'm definitely that competent, fast skier who never acquired a taste for "gnar" (with or without the cinnamon) and I'm becoming less aggressive with age, not more. Will absolutely see if I can't track down those K2 models to demo before we get into full swing (if we ever do) out here! Thanks again.

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

Your commentary on the models that you skied is a little hard to dechipher but it sounds suspiciously like poor tuning on those demos as none of those are bad skis. IAC......it sounds to my eye as if you would be a candidate for a K2 Rictor or Aftershock. Both are very comfortable skis for almost anyone. These are both medium soft, damp, and easygoing but both have reasonable edge grip and are nicely stable. While sometimes vilified as non aggressive skis, the fact is that there are skiers who can benefit from that. Either model is a great choice for a competent skier who does not charge all the time nor eat "gnar" sprinkled with barbed wire for breakfast. If a wider (87mm) ski fits into your picture, the Dynastar Outland 87 is exceptionally versatile and a little more aggressive than the K2s.

 

SJ 
 

+1 on the Aftershocks.

I've found them to be an amazing crud skis - couldn't stop smiling the first time I took mine out.

My wife, of course, thought I was nuts. Until she took her Lotta Luvs into the crud.

Then she understood.

 

Have fun OP,    rickp

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

Broken glass and sour milk is really tastier. 

Typical Sierra Jim misinformation. nonono2.gif My small kids eat that for snacks. He obviously hasn't seen the new Wheaties "Breakfast of Gnar" campaign. Each box gives you 1000% of the RDA for vertical pitch, and if served with the wire, 500% of the RDA for pain threshold. Have a bowl of that in the am, grab your saucer and Jack Daniels, GO DO IT!

 

Then again, K2's he mentions are great choices. Should be easy to find some demos. 

post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Typical Sierra Jim misinformation. nonono2.gif My small kids eat that for snacks. He obviously hasn't seen the new Wheaties "Breakfast of Gnar" campaign. Each box gives you 1000% of the RDA for vertical pitch, and if served with the wire, 500% of the RDA for pain threshold. Have a bowl of that in the am, grab your saucer and Jack Daniels, GO DO IT!

 

Then again, K2's he mentions are great choices. Should be easy to find some demos. 


Tried it and I now have a sore throat and a burning sensation somewhere around my...........uhhhhhhh.........

 

SJ

post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 

So... tried a demo of the Rictor in 167 and liked it (a lot!), couldn't get onto a 174, nor could I try the Aftershock. At 5'7" and 180lb I'm not sure whether I should hold out until I can ski the 174 or just pull the trigger. There seems to be only a small amount of tip rocker, any opinions on whether I need the extra effective edge of the 174? Thanks again to SJ for the lead, wouldn't normally have even looked at K2!

post #11 of 14
I guess the question is whether a 167 Rictor, which may be slightly short for your weight to begin with, is going to help you with your original stated goal of handling mixed non-corduroy conditions better. Or are you proposing to buy the 174 Aftershock based on the Rictor demo?
post #12 of 14
at 180 lb I'd suggest the 174, Elvis.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

QCanoe, think I've settled on the Rictor over the Aftershock since 80mm underfoot feels good and the vast majority of my skiing is on the groomers. Thus my question was whether I ought to be looking at the Rictor in 167 (demoed and felt decent) or 174. Sounds like the consensus so far is that 167 may be short for me, though I'm coming off a pair of Fischers in 165 that served me well except in the crud and on the rare powder day. Just don't want to get too much ski under my beat-up old legs and knees!

 

Finger is on the trigger, only reason I haven't pulled is because I can't find a demo Rictor in 174 near me. Decisions, decisions...

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 

Just closing the thread... Rictor in 174 is the winner and I couldn't be happier. Added the Atomic Blackeye Ti to the demo list and it was a very tough call but SJ was dead-on about the Rictor being damp and stable, characteristics that worked well for me. 4 ski days to date on the Rictor and my only "complaint" is that the Rictor smooths things out so much that I'm skiing half again as fast as I think I am, resulting in the occasional unintended liftoff! 

 

Thanks to all for the great advice and feedback!

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