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Tiger......... or Puddy Tat?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
How refreshing with Woods playing so consistently poor to not have to hear about him 24/7.

Perhaps golf can now recapture it's image as the sport who's participants conduct themselves with a touch of class.
post #2 of 29
Not that I care about golf in the least, but how did Tiger ever hurt golf's "Classy" image?
post #3 of 29
By "class", do you mean fat ass white guys wearing lime green slacks?
post #4 of 29
"Perhaps golf can now recapture it's image as the sport who's participants conduct themselves with a touch of class."

yeah, like the good ol' days when fuzzy zoeller was more representative of that "refreshing" element.

Fore!!!
post #5 of 29
Thread Starter 
Class goes a little deeper than that Mr. T.

No Cat, when I speak about class I'm speaking of guys like Palmer and Nickolas, and the generations that continue to look up to and emulate them. They set a standard of sportsmanship that set golf apart from the current behavior standards of other sports.

Then Tiger enters the picture and decimates golfs higher standard.

Dancing around the course with "look at me, aren't I wonderful" theatrics reminiscent of the idiotic antics that occur in the NFL.

Pouting, swearing, throwing clubs. I heard the most obscene verbal excrement come out of his mouth after an errant tee shot ended up in the water that I've ever heard broadcast on television. Repeated here the post would be deleted. He conducts himself like a spoiled little child who should have his clubs taken away from him until he can learn to behave with better manners. What a shame that he brought such poor behavior to a sport that prior aspired to a higher standard.

Fuzzy Zoeller: The class clown.

Tiger: An out of control little brat that needs to be spanked and sent to his room.
post #6 of 29
I too am happy to see some golf coverage featuring someone other than Tiger 24/7, and I agree that the game and it's participants have changed over the last several years. I don't, however believe that it's changed because of one player, but because of the way the sport of golf has evolved through the years.

Think about it. Twenty years ago most golfers were white collar professionals (or thir family) who had the financial means to gain access to the mostly private clubs around the country. As more and more public courses came about, more and more golfers from all walks of life started to play, and now many of this generation's golfers and spectators are being represented in todays game. If the sportsmanship and behavior of the past is to be maintained, it's up to this generation of golf professionals to follow the leads of golfers past, and to set an example for the golfing generations to come.
post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
Coach, the problem is when the top guy in the game, one who garners so much media attention, displays such behavior it sets the tone for the coming generation because he's the guy they want to emulate. Palmer set the tone for the generation that followed him, and did so in a proactive manner, personally admonishing players who behaved inappropriately.

The last sentence of your post sums it up perfectly:

"If the sportsmanship and behavior of the past is to be maintained, it's up to this generation of golf professionals to follow the leads of golfers past, and to set an example for the golfing generations to come."


I work with young, impressionable athletes, and I see the impact the behavior of their role models have on their own. I put a great amount of energy into helping these kids develop into mature sportsmen, and the antics of many professional athletes, along with teenage role models from other areas of life, only serve to make my task more difficult.
post #8 of 29
Fast,

thanks; just wanted you to extrapolate a bit on your lead.

and to digress...
i will try to find more but i recall reading something about how Nike was against the winner of the Masters autographing (and then selling? "just" autographing?) pictures that would include Tiger handing over the green jacket.
post #9 of 29
Fastman

What absolute egotistical drivel.

You personify the modern standard standard of attacking people all the while magnifying your self ignorance.

Fastman you talk about Jack "Nickloas"- you lucidly illustrate your minimal knowledge of the sport- you can't even spell his name correctly-it is NICKLAUS.

By the way, how much has the Fastman Foundation given back to skiing and children, I'm sure it is right up there with the tens of millions the Tiger Woods Foundation has. And no doubt your immense personal contributions to skiing have thousands of young children taking up the sport. How much of your time is given to free clinics for children from poor to rich?

Sure he has a temper,but so did Tommy Bolt (pre TV era) who probably threw and broke more clubs in a season than Tiger has in his entire career. Guess what-there are a lot of PGA Tour players paying fines each week for momentary outbursts. I'm sure your little racing darlings have never uttered a foul word or gotten mad at themselves. Tiger has an intense, overwhelming desire to win which has served to both grow the game among our junior population and raise the standard on tour.

Maybe you just want a pack of emotionless grinders out there. The tour needs more fist pumpers and emotion. The extrapolation that his emotion has degraded the game is utter BS.

If you took the time to look at Tiger's overall impact on the game, instead of focusing on a few incidents that TV captures you might come away with an impression more in line with the general public.

If you don't like Tiger-thats your choice. You have a mute button and an on/off switch. Practice using them, he will be back on top soon.

Get a life!
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Ski and Golf, what a pathetic tirade.

How dare I criticize the great and wonderful Tiger Woods, I should be bowing at his feet like the rest of you mindless hero worshipers. With your blind admiration and defense of his childish antics you make yourself part of the problem by granting him carteblanche license to behave in any offensive juvenile manner he likes.

Your right, my knowledge of the game of golf in not extensive. I've played a few times but find it a bit passive for my blood. Rates right up there with horse shoes and lawn darts, but more expensive. Perhaps when I get old and feeble, and find walking a challenging form of physical activity I might consider taking it up. However, I do watch on occasion, such as when stuck in the house doing cleaning or something, and do find it mildly entertaining. And I have followed the career of the greats over the years, I always respect the mastery of any form of physical expression. I respect that aspect of Tiger, and it's that which drew me to watch him play. What I don't respect, however, is his behavior. It's inexcusable, no matter how much you would like to demand that the world to do so.

And give me a break about all the good this guy does. You don't have a clue about this foundation crap do you? It's the easiest thing in the world for a celebrity with all the money in the world to throw a little of it toward a "CAUSE" and stroke their ego about how wonderful they are while simultaneously enhancing their public image, popularity, and thus bank account. It's an investment that returns much more than it drains. Every celebrity has their pet "CAUSE", it goes with the game.

I have little respect for window dressing humanitarianism. What I do respect is the work of the ground troops on the front line of the "CAUSE". These are the people who have little money but contribute their time and physical efforts to make a real difference in other peoples lives. They don't get the public attention of the big bucks celebrities who do nothing more than throw a little money around, but without them nothing would get done. I know many of these type of people, they devote their lives to helping others and I respect them immensely. From your cavalier comments I suspect you know none. And you know nothing of the contributions I've made in my life.

Finally, talk about needing to get a life! Get off your knees, quit kissing Tiger's royal feet, and find the personal character to acknowledge the shortcomings of this spoiled little primadonna you so loyally worship. Your a nothing more than a spineless little boot licker in your present condition. Stand up and be a man for cripe sakes.
post #11 of 29
I think Tiger has added class to the sport of golf and he's not even my favorite player. Look at most of the other athletes that are at or near the top of their sport, they are intense and focused. People express it in different ways, but I have seen nothing bizarre in Tiger's behavior. If anything detracts from the sport it's the current crop of fans who feel they need to be part of the action even though they possess no talent.
post #12 of 29
I am baffled by the emotion here.

First off, anybody who's ever been to a professional golf tournament--and not just watched them on TV--would realize that Tiger Woods is pretty reasonably behaved. Just like the rest of the pros, he lets his emotions show when he isn't playing up to his own standards. On TV, you don't see much of that from the others because the cameras are generally following the leaders, not the guys blowing up. But Tiger is such a focal point that he's on display even when he's not worth watching.

At least CBS didn't show Woods vomiting on the final day of the Masters, when he played instead of withdrawing even though he had food poisoning and wasn't in contention. On the other hand, CBS did show good old Jack Nicklaus, disappointed at not making the cut, throw a mild hissy and threaten never to play in the tournament again. And nobody thought less of Nicklaus for it--he's a competitor and he was disappointed and hot.

Nowadays conduct is publicly displayed that would have never seen the light of day a decade or a generation ago. But the good old days when everybody behaved like perfect ladies and gentlemen never were.

So, unless somebody can point to something awful that Woods has done, I don't understand the basis for claiming he's immature, spoiled, etc. (and, BTW, twirling a wedge and letting it drop to the ground when your shot ends above the hole isn't 'throwing a club').

On the other hand, I suspect both Orville Moody and Lee Trevino have a better claim to pioneering ethnic ground than Tiger Woods. The claim that [name your golfer] opened the game of golf to legions to whom the gates were previously slammed shut has been around for a long time. It will be ten years or so before anybody has any idea how effective First Tee or Woods' example is. In the meantime, they provide feel good copy.

Finally, everybody in this argument seems to accept the implicit assumption that golf is a rich man's game. I have my doubts about that, or, put another way, I doubt that golf is any less accessible to the thin-wallet enthusiast than skiing. As other people have observed in other threads, it's all a matter of where you want to put your recreational dollars.

And, yeah, cattracksplat, Nike would like to get more than its fair share of your recreational dollar. So what else is new?
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by FastMan:
Ski and Golf, what a pathetic tirade.

How dare I criticize the great and wonderful Tiger Woods, I should be bowing at his feet like the rest of you mindless hero worshipers. With your blind admiration and defense of his childish antics you make yourself part of the problem by granting him carteblanche license to behave in any offensive juvenile manner he likes.

Your right, my knowledge of the game of golf in not extensive. I've played a few times but find it a bit passive for my blood. Rates right up there with horse shoes and lawn darts, but more expensive. Perhaps when I get old and feeble, and find walking a challenging form of physical activity I might consider taking it up. However, I do watch on occasion, such as when stuck in the house doing cleaning or something, and do find it mildly entertaining. And I have followed the career of the greats over the years, I always respect the mastery of any form of physical expression. I respect that aspect of Tiger, and it's that which drew me to watch him play. What I don't respect, however, is his behavior. It's inexcusable, no matter how much you would like to demand that the world to do so.

And give me a break about all the good this guy does. You don't have a clue about this foundation crap do you? It's the easiest thing in the world for a celebrity with all the money in the world to throw a little of it toward a "CAUSE" and stroke their ego about how wonderful they are while simultaneously enhancing their public image, popularity, and thus bank account. It's an investment that returns much more than it drains. Every celebrity has their pet "CAUSE", it goes with the game.

I have little respect for window dressing humanitarianism. What I do respect is the work of the ground troops on the front line of the "CAUSE". These are the people who have little money but contribute their time and physical efforts to make a real difference in other peoples lives. They don't get the public attention of the big bucks celebrities who do nothing more than throw a little money around, but without them nothing would get done. I know many of these type of people, they devote their lives to helping others and I respect them immensely. From your cavalier comments I suspect you know none. And you know nothing of the contributions I've made in my life.

Finally, talk about needing to get a life! Get off your knees, quit kissing Tiger's royal feet, and find the personal character to acknowledge the shortcomings of this spoiled little primadonna you so loyally worship. Your a nothing more than a spineless little boot licker in your present condition. Stand up and be a man for cripe sakes.
Punched the reply button a bit too fast. Sorry.

You bigotry is rampant!

How dare I criticize the great and wonderful Tiger Woods, I should be bowing at his feet like the rest of you mindless hero worshipers.

Glad you think over 25 million golfers and other millions of non golfers who admire Tiger are all mindless.

Your right, my knowledge of the game of golf in not extensive. I've played a few times but find it a bit passive for my blood.

Yes, your knowledge is extremely limited in this arena. If you find golf is not your liking that's fine. Just don't assume it is a license to attack others.

Perhaps when I get old and feeble, and find walking a challenging form of physical activity I might consider taking it up.

Sterotyping at its worst exhibiting no knowledge of the demographics of the game.

And give me a break about all the good this guy does. You don't have a clue about this foundation crap do you?

I guess all the clinics he has done for our service personnel, for the families of the troops at Ft Bragg, for the inner city kids are just throwing money instead of being involved in the cause.

Finally, talk about needing to get a life! Get off your knees, quit kissing Tiger's royal feet, and find the personal character to acknowledge the shortcomings of this spoiled little primadonna you so loyally worship. Your a nothing more than a spineless little boot licker in your present condition. Stand up and be a man for cripe sakes.

Glad to see your back SCSA-get caught in BS MAXIMUS and called you resort to a name calling rant.

[ April 20, 2004, 08:36 PM: Message edited by: Ski&Golf ]
post #14 of 29
Woods has revitalized golf in much the same manner Palmer did in the early sixties.

Fastman, I don't know whether you have actually ever watched a golf broadcast, however, I think Woods Tiger is no more prone to angry outbursts than the average PGA professional. Keep in mind he gets a good deal of airtime due to his place on or near the top of the leaderboard.

How do I know? I played golf for four years in the ACC, played mini tour golf, and did a stint caddying on the PGA tour.

Every decade has had golfers with a fiery temper.

Titanic Thompson, Bill Melhorn, Tommy Bolt, Ken Green.

People love to see it. It makes good copy. As to your concerns about the NFL? Puhleaze. When fans start drinking lemonade and sitting in their seats in a manner akin to watching opera players will stop their endzone antics. The league has taken steps this year to tone things down including 15 yards for "celebrations" and in a way I think there will be a little backlash. Fans like it.

If I didn't know better I would question whether the basis for your obvious disdain isn't something we all abhor.

Tiger is an tremendous talent. He is facing the kind of slump every player would love to have in so far as he is still the number one player in the world.

I also bet we could name a few ski racers who won't win any awards as role models.

Stick to teaching your charges counter rotation!
post #15 of 29
Thread Starter 
SKI&GOLF:
Bigot? Why, you bet I am. I'm utterly intolerant of people with poor behavior.

When I see a guy who sits on top of the hill of world admiration throwing his club and screaming "SH*T, G*D D*MN IT, F**KING PR**K" for the world to see and hear it disturbs me. I know there are millions of people out there that will love and worship this guy, because of his great skill in the game, who will minimize, condone and defend this behavior and thus society will become ever more desensitized to it. I see this as a problem, the degradation of the emotional maturity of society.

Your aggressive personal attack on someone who dared to point out a particular flaw in one of your heroes only serves as evidence of the legitimacy of my concern. SG, in allowing yourself to become a victim of the contagium you become part of the problem.


RUSTY,
So we meet again on the field of battle!

YOU SAID:
Fastman, I don't know whether you have actually ever watched a golf broadcast, however, I think Woods Tiger is no more prone to angry outbursts than the average PGA professional. Keep in mind he gets a good deal of airtime due to his place on or near the top of the leaderboard.

REPLY:
I have viewed many broadcasts Rusty, it's all that's on my non cable TV on the weekends. Well, that and auto racing. I've never gone to witness a tournament in person, so your right, my knowledge of behavior on the tour is limited to what the broadcasters choose to present. Perhaps poor behavior is more rampant on the tour than I realize, but that's irrelevant. Most people who watch golf do so from my vantage point and thus will be presented with the same image of the game, and of Tiger. Most will process that image like Ski & Golf has done, I know that, and it's what concerns me. Immature behavior will become minimized, accepted and defended.

YOU SAID:
If I didn't know better I would question whether the basis for your obvious disdain isn't something we all abhor.

REPLY:
Rusty, I'm going to go out on a limb here and assume your referring to racism.

Rest assured, I'm an equal opportunity bad behavior bigot. I was just as disgusted with John McEnroe and the generation of tennis brats his behavior fostered. I chastised Tomba to my racers for his LOOK AT ME finish line theatrics, boasting, and off slope behavior.

My beliefs show consistent in the manner in which I guide my racers. I've pulled bibs from racers and sent them to the lodge for the day for emotional outbursts. I've had racers sit out of future races because of bad behavior. I've had kids walk up the side of the race slope and apologize to the TD, the chief of race, and every gatekeeper on the hill for their poor behavior.

But I'm sure many out there reading this thread have, like you, questioned my racial tolerance. That's the present day risk someone assumes when they dare to criticize someone of color who achieves success.

Rusty, you suggest I stick to teaching counter rotation.

As I've indicated above there's more to coaching in my mind than teaching a kid how to ski. I attempt to help kids develop into highly refined success oriented young adults who possess the achievement skills necessary to reach their goals in any area of life they pursue. I use the forum of ski racing only as a class room to teach more important life lessons and I consider emotional development as an important element in that formula, so I'll continue to include it in my teachings. But thanks for the suggestion.

[ April 21, 2004, 12:34 PM: Message edited by: FastMan ]
post #16 of 29
I got no problems with Tiger. He's great and he knows it, but that same self-pride drives his matchless intensity. Just think what it would have done to golf etiquette if John Daly had emerged as the best golfer on the planet?
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by Jamesj:
I got no problems with Tiger. He's great and he knows it, but that same self-pride drives his matchless intensity.
It's not about ego...it's about behavior. Further, no professional golfers behavior can begin to approach what we see on the sidelines and in the dugouts of the NFL, NBA, and MLB.

BTW, have you guys ever noticed that good coaches never have problems with these types of player or if they do the problem doesn't last long. I'll bet good money you won't see cell phones or Sharpies popping out in Washington or Dallas in the upcoming NFL season, AND if you do we'll go double or nothing that they're cut on the spot.

Give me Cal Ripken as a professional, most of the rest you can keep.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by FastMan:
RUSTY,
So we meet again on the field of battle!
It's an internet forum not a battlefield and you are the one who decided you could make a silly attempt to elevate your own sense of self worth by sharing your dislike of the decorum of one of the worlds great athletes.

I'm certain you have played a substantial role in the lives of thousands of kids. I would suggest you leave the parenting to mom and dad and just teach the kids how to ski race. Good grief Fastman, let loose of the mindless self righteous hearts and minds dribble.

This brings new meaning to the term loco parentus.

P.S. Coach....the NFL has put steps in place to just about stop "endzone antics". I for one regret this. Where would football be without the Ickky Woods shuffle?
post #19 of 29
Thread Starter 
Rusty, if I felt all I was doing for the last 20 plus years was "just teaching kids to ski" I could not have continued to mustered up the passion that have motivated me to make the personal sacrifices that were required to be a coach. And believe it or not, the families that have been associated with me have been very appreciative of my teachings that expanded beyond snow, so again, thanks for your heart felt suggestion, but I will continue with my present philosophical approach.

And please don't worry about me, my sense of self worth is just fine. I do question yours however, because of your seeming perpetual need to challenge and attack me (the basis for my battlefield comment). Please don't let my strong self assuredness intimidate you and intensify your own feelings of inadequacy. I don't mean for that to happen and I do try to treat you gently because I know it's a problem for you.

Try this with me, perhaps it will help:

Turn, look in the mirror, and ready now, say:
"I'M GOOD ENOUGH, I'M SMART ENOUGH, AND GOSH DARN IT, PEOPLE LIKE ME!"
post #20 of 29
Fastman...

Everyone is entitled to their opinion...but I think you're off base. I've wateched a lot of golf, and while Tiger can be a little petulant at times, esp. w/ cameras, I don't see him as being much different than a lot of the pros. (Ex. Davis love's little hissy fit at the Match Play finals a couple of months ago).As to his overzealous celebrations? I've never seen him do anything that would compare to NFL style antics. Language...even Fred Couples dropped an f-bomb on TV a couple of years ago.

I think, for whatever reason, you're just not a Tiger fan.
post #21 of 29
Fastman said:

Your aggressive personal attack on someone who dared to point out a particular flaw in one of your heroes only serves as evidence of the legitimacy of my concern. SG, in allowing yourself to become a victim of the contagium you become part of the problem.

S & G:

Sorry to destroy one of the underpinnings of your thought process but I am not and never have particulary been a fan (in the usual definition of a fan-my guy or team-right or wrong) of Tiger.

I am an absolute admirer of his skill, dedication and mental toughness. I am an absolute admirer of how he has raised the standard on the PGA and other tours. I am an absolute admirer of those who have responded with renewed dedication to raise the level of their game in response.

Head to head and against the field there are a lot of others I would probably rather see win but first and foremost I will root for great golf where somebody wins rather than somebody looses. Ultimately I don't care who raises the trophy on Sunday afternoon.

I think he was seriously mistaken in dumping Butch Harmon as his coach and has suffered accordingly.

So the victim card doesn't work Fastman.


Fastman said:

Perhaps poor behavior is more rampant on the tour than I realize...

S & G:

Far from it. If you understood the fine structure (along with potential suspensions) on the PGA Tour for incidents not in keeping with the etiquette of golf (so important it is Section 1 in the Rules of Golf) and ever saw 4 days of a tournament in person instead of selected TV highlights you'd come to understand behavior problems are minimal. Uttering expletives when mad at yourself, slamming your club back in you bag are part of human response to stress. Sorry that is life. Throwing clubs over the head of the gallery would be a totally different story. There is a vast difference

Rule 33-7 dealing with the reponsibility of those running an event being played under USGA rules (which PGA Tour events are) allows for disqualification of any player deemed have to have seriously breeched the etiquette guidelines. I've seen it done in sectional events, when warranted.


Fastman said:

Most people who watch golf do so from my vantage point and thus will be presented with the same image of the game, and of Tiger. Most will process that image like Ski & Golf has done, I know that, and it's what concerns me. Immature behavior will become minimized, accepted and defended.

S & G:

I believe the vast majority of the golfing and non golfing public would reject the very basis of your thesis. Your standard of acceptable behavior should be your standard not a reason to cheer Tiger's (whether he agrees he is in a slump or not) current level of play as you posited in your initial post. That is what really annoyed me. There is no justifiable connection between the two.


Fastman said:

My beliefs show consistent in the manner in which I guide my racers. I've pulled bibs from racers and sent them to the lodge for the day for emotional outbursts. I've had racers sit out of future races because of bad behavior. I've had kids walk up the side of the race slope and apologize to the TD, the chief of race, and every gatekeeper on the hill for their poor behavior.

S & G:

One the first tee of every junior tournamnent I conduct the competitors are verbally and on the rules sheet advised they are subject to IMMEDIATE disqualification for serious breeches of etiqutte as well as a ban from participation in future events. So may we agree on something.
post #22 of 29
I am a Tiger Woods fan. Tiger has the drive that makes him a world class competitor the same as the Herminator, Jordon or any top athelete is. I know I wouldn't want to be as good as he is because I do not have the where-with-all that he puts into his game.

Tiger is THAT good, when he is on, no one on earth can touch him. You might not like that, but you have to respect that he is the best because he works the hardest.
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Yep, he's a great athletic talent. So was O.J. Simpson.

Even when he was speeding down the highway with a gun to his head all I could think about was how much I enjoyed watching him break off tackle.
post #24 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by Ski&Golf:

Your standard of acceptable behavior should be your standard, not a reason to cheer Tiger's current level of play as you posited in your initial post.

That is what really annoyed me.

There is no justifiable connection between the two[/QB]
Wrong, there's a very clear and important connection. That you and so many others can't see it is the disturbing issue.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by FastMan:
Yep, he's a great athletic talent. So was O.J. Simpson.

Even when he was speeding down the highway with a gun to his head all I could think about was how much I enjoyed watching him break off tackle.
Hmmmm... Phil sniffs bait.....swims away. :
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally posted by FastMan:
</font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Ski&Golf:

Your standard of acceptable behavior should be your standard, not a reason to cheer Tiger's current level of play as you posited in your initial post.

That is what really annoyed me.

There is no justifiable connection between the two
Wrong, there's a very clear and important connection. That you and so many others can't see it is the disturbing issue. [/QB]</font>[/quote]Wrong again-you just keep hitting it OB.

The comparison of Tiger and OJ is just revolting. Your really stretching an already ludicrous line of thought.
post #27 of 29
I know everyone is missing skiing but let's cool it!
post #28 of 29
Yeah, foos...cool it. I pity the poor foo what don't. Meanwhile...back at the ranch...
post #29 of 29
Is Tiger's behavior on the golf course exemplary and what we would like to see from a role model all the time, of course not. He can certainly improve.
He's an immense talent setting standards and goals that are within his reach but very difficult to consistently achieve in the game of golf. Tiger's very intense and needs to learn to quell the beast that roars within him when things go sour for him.
I wonder if his career will be long. I think his swing puts so much stress on his body, I see him needing a hip before he's forty,
The greatest thing about golf is the tremendous physical contrasts of the competitors. Compare John Daly to Tiger Woods physical fitness wise. Both guys can let it fly 300 yards of the tee. What other sport can you see that kind of performance parity with contrasting physical types. Tiger's greatness will be defined by his longevity. I don't see him however playing forever like Nicklaus and Palmer.
How about this Bobby Jones quote, " If golf's worth playing at all, it's worth playing well".
I love that quote and I look forward to see the new Bobby Jones movie coming out. I wonder if we can aply the same quote to skiing!
Fast Man I agree, Tiger's greatness is compromised by his behavior. It will be interesting to see who emerges as his swing guru now that he's slumping a bit. I think he needs to get back with Butch Harmon pretty quick.
The guy I admire is Daly. He battles a lot of demons and when he won a couple of weeks his first response was how important the win was for his fans that have supported forever between wins. He is very appreciative of the people that support him and I think that is a very endearing trait.
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