EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Après-Ski › Corkage fees in Colorado
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Corkage fees in Colorado

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Does anyone know if restaurants in Colorado offer corkage fees? For those that don't know that means is, where the customer can bring his/her own bottle of wine to a restaurant for dinner to drink and the restaurant charges a small fee to open it.

 

I don't even know if one can do this in Colorado. I've got a few bottles from 96 and 98 that I would love to open for dinner during the holidays.

post #2 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by voelfgar View Post

Does anyone know if restaurants in Colorado offer corkage fees? For those that don't know that means is, where the customer can bring his/her own bottle of wine to a restaurant for dinner to drink and the restaurant charges a small fee to open it.

 

I don't even know if one can do this in Colorado. I've got a few bottles from 96 and 98 that I would love to open for dinner during the holidays.

 

 

Yes they can do it.....you will need to check with each place to see what their fees are...or you can come by my place and I'll open and decant them for you and serve up some nice stilton to go with thembiggrin.gif

post #3 of 21
Don't live in CO but perhaps it's a good idea to call ahead - I don't bring any from my stash out any more since I have yet to find a restaurant in Vail that will allow it. Have been told it is "against the law" YMMV
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by givethepigeye View Post

Don't live in CO but perhaps it's a good idea to call ahead - I don't bring any from my stash out any more since I have yet to find a restaurant in Vail that will allow it. Have been told it is "against the law" YMMV

Edit- not allowed as of 2011 according to http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/44507  It seems as if about half the states restrict bringing your own wine.

 

Not sure if it is still the case, but according to the WSJ, it was illegal in 2001 http://guides.wsj.com/wine/dining-with-wine/bringing-your-own-wine-to-a-restaurant/  This 2008 thread seems to confirm it http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/535573 but one poster says that there have been some recent changes (which may not affect corkage).

 

I would definitely call ahead to specific restaurants as some may not allow it even if the law has changed.  Like UGASkiDawg said first, I am always willing to open a good bottle of wine in my house.

post #5 of 21

You can take home partially full bottles if purchased at a restaurant, however ... 

post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys for the info.

 

Guess I'll have to enjoy the good stuff out there over pizza or pasta in our condo. Not going to pay a 300% markup on a bottle of wine I already have at home.

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by voelfgar View Post

Thanks guys for the info.

 

Guess I'll have to enjoy the good stuff out there over pizza or pasta in our condo. Not going to pay a 300% markup on a bottle of wine I already have at home.

 

I usually try to seek out stuff I very specifically /don't/ have at home, which, given the US 3-tier distribution system, should not be all that hard to do. 

 

*wanders off, thinking of Stilton*

 

EDIT: If you /do/ end up bringing your own, I would welcome your thoughts in this thread:  http://www.epicski.com/t/112624/tastes-great-at-home-but-nasty-on-high-altitude-ski-trips


Edited by cantunamunch - 12/20/12 at 10:46am
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

I usually try to seek out stuff I very specifically /don't/ have at home, which, given the US 3-tier distribution system, should not be all that hard to do. 

 

*wanders off, thinking of Stilton*

 

EDIT: If you /do/ end up bringing your own, I would welcome your thoughts in this thread:  http://www.epicski.com/t/112624/tastes-great-at-home-but-nasty-on-high-altitude-ski-trips

 

There are more wineries in Napa Valley and Sonoma County that only sell their wine direct from the winery than there are that distribute them. And even among the wineries that do distribute, they usually don't distribute their best. Nearly everything I own, you can only buy it direct from the winery

post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by voelfgar View Post
Nearly everything I own, you can only buy it direct from the winery

 

You're fortunate.   That's not exactly easy to do east of the Mississippi, unless one is in WVa or a restaurant owner in DC.

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

You're fortunate.   That's not exactly easy to do east of the Mississippi, unless one is in WVa or a restaurant owner in DC.

But Wisconsin is east of the Mississippi. just order from their websites and they'll ship it to you.

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by voelfgar View Post

But Wisconsin is east of the Mississippi. just order from their websites and they'll ship it to you.

 

Yeah.   If I want to pay for a) delivery and storage in the county bonded warehouse b) shipping from there to the wine shop of my choice where I pay to take delivery.

 

As said, you're lucky.

post #12 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

Yeah.   If I want to pay for a) delivery and storage in the county bonded warehouse b) shipping from there to the wine shop of my choice where I pay to take delivery.

 

As said, you're lucky.

So what? you can't ship it to your home address? and as for the shipping it isn't that unreasonable, in fact, I've gotten emails from several wineries advertising $1 shipping if you buy a case(mix and match if you want)

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by voelfgar View Post

So what? you can't ship it to your home address?

 

No.   As I wrote above,  I have to have it shipped to the county warehouse, have it sit in the warehouse, then have it shipped from the warehouse to a wine store where the wine store sells it to me.      It's so much of a PITA that most wineries simply will not do it unless they already have distributors here, it takes forever, and there's a markup on each stage of the process.      Higher up in the thread you were complaining about senseless markup? 

 

As I said, you're lucky.  

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by voelfgar View Post

Thanks guys for the info.

Guess I'll have to enjoy the good stuff out there over pizza or pasta in our condo. Not going to pay a 300% markup on a bottle of wine I already have at home.

I usually try to seek out stuff I very specifically /don't/ have at home, which, given the US 3-tier distribution system, should not be all that hard to do. 

*wanders off, thinking of Stilton*

EDIT: If you /do/ end up bringing your own, I would welcome your thoughts in this thread:  http://www.epicski.com/t/112624/tastes-great-at-home-but-nasty-on-high-altitude-ski-trips

70 Fonseca with that Stilton, please! smile.gif
post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

No.   As I wrote above,  I have to have it shipped to the county warehouse, have it sit in the warehouse, then have it shipped from the warehouse to a wine store where the wine store sells it to me.      It's so much of a PITA that most wineries simply will not do it unless they already have distributors here, it takes forever, and there's a markup on each stage of the process.      Higher up in the thread you were complaining about senseless markup? 

 

As I said, you're lucky.  

I guess then you aren't actually in maryland because you can if you are.

 

http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/local/politics/2011/07/wine_shipping_legal_today_enti.html

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post

Edit- not allowed as of 2011 according to http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show/id/44507  It seems as if about half the states restrict bringing your own wine.

 

Not sure if it is still the case, but according to the WSJ, it was illegal in 2001 http://guides.wsj.com/wine/dining-with-wine/bringing-your-own-wine-to-a-restaurant/  This 2008 thread seems to confirm it http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/535573 but one poster says that there have been some recent changes (which may not affect corkage).

 

I would definitely call ahead to specific restaurants as some may not allow it even if the law has changed.  Like UGASkiDawg said first, I am always willing to open a good bottle of wine in my house.

 

 

That may have changed.  One of my friends in Aspen open a restaurant and they let people BYOB until they got there license.  But then, enforcement of laws is kind of frowned upon there.

post #17 of 21

There was a recent Supreme Court decision that may have changed that. It ruled that laws preventing wineries shipping direct to someones house was unconstitutional, may want to look into the shipping thing again. 

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by voelfgar View Post

 

There are more wineries in Napa Valley and Sonoma County that only sell their wine direct from the winery than there are that distribute them. And even among the wineries that do distribute, they usually don't distribute their best. Nearly everything I own, you can only buy it direct from the winery

 

^QFT or pay 300% markup when it does show on the shelf somewhere.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post

 Like UGASkiDawg said first, I am always willing to open a good bottle of wine in my house.

 

Maybe barter?

post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by givethepigeye View Post

 

^QFT or pay 300% markup when it does show on the shelf somewhere.

Guess I'm not understanding what you are try to say.

post #21 of 21
^As you know many wines have very limited distribution and if they do see the light of day - get marked up incredible %'s ie Kosta Browne Sonoma Coast sells for $50 to those "on the list"
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Après-Ski
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Après-Ski › Corkage fees in Colorado