or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Help choose my first ski boots
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Help choose my first ski boots

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello,

Please, help me choose my first ski boots. I am intermediate to advanced skier aiming at improving my technique. This describes my skill level pretty well: “2.You are a much more confident skier now that your skis are parallel most of the time; this is because you are skiing faster and you are consistently linking your turns. You have felt the ski carve and enjoy using the shape to help you change direction. You are now able to travel at different speeds on pisted runs. You can ski all Green and Blue Runs and are feeling much more confident on Red runs, you may even have tried a Black run, and you are now choosing to experiment with easy moguls.”

I am 5ft 8in tall and I weigh 220lb, 31 year old male skier.  My foot is 270 mm long and 102 mm wide.

I am considering several options Atomic M 90 (2012), Head Adapt Edge 100, and Tecnica Phoenix 90 ski boots (or maybe some other choice would be better). For which ones should I go? I am concerned about performance and all day comfort. I am unclear about stiffness. Is 90 flex for my weight and skill to soft or maybe too stiff. And I have very little understanding of canting.

I have been several times in Tatras and skied locally in Lithuania and now planning another trip to Tatras to Czech Republic or Slovakia. I and decided to go for my own boots. So any advice will be appreciated.

post #2 of 7

Hi form up north. You are fearly heavy, 100kg. 90 flex could be an issue especially if you ski faster but you cannot compare flex between brands and models by simply looking at the specs. My best advice would be to go to a store that carries lots of different brands and has a huge selection of models. Its really important that you sit down and try different boots. Different brands and models. Not looking at price, artwork or color. Two things to consider, how they fit and how they perform. If the boot fits well but you have one or more pressure points that can be fixed by streching the shell. Remember that boots feel snugg at first but loosen up after use both from the foam in the liner packs out and your foot gets used to the pressure. Dont worrie about canting. Just ask the guy at the store to adjust the tilt of the upper half of the boots if needed.

 

The Head seems like a good boot but you need to try it on to see how it fits. Also, always try different sizes of the boot. Your size is probably 28 but try 27 as well.

post #3 of 7

Hey, I got crucified for saying this on another thread , but I'm gonna say it again. First pair of boots, all things being equal, why not get one with a walk setting and some rubber on the soles? Shouldn't limit your choice much, there are a lot of such boots around now. And before the know-it-all choir chimes in here, note this guy's in Europe, where we tend to walk a lot in our ski boots. 

One other point. If you're unsure about flex, you could opt for a pair that are flex-adjustable, it's usually a two-settings range (eg, 110-120, 120-130, etc.). I have my doubts about how much of a difference those adjustments actually make (I've always just chosen one setting, so can't really say), but could be worth a try. 

post #4 of 7

Find a ski shop with an experienced boot fitter that you can return to for adjustments at no extra charge.

You list your foot width as 102, so keep in mind that when boot widths are listed they don't give the width for each size. Instead, they rate a boot as say 98mm wide or 100mm wide and they are talking about the width of a size 26.

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

Find a ski shop with an experienced boot fitter that you can return to for adjustments at no extra charge.

You list your foot width as 102, so keep in mind that when boot widths are listed they don't give the width for each size. Instead, they rate a boot as say 98mm wide or 100mm wide and they are talking about the width of a size 26.

This is valid advice.  Stiffer boots mean more immediate response.  This is a very good thing if you are experienced enough to handle it.  If not it will magnify your errors greatly (same as a stiffer ski).  My guess is you will out grow 90 very quickly and it will later hinder your skiing a little bit down the line.  Again it depends on your preference on the type of skiing you do (or want to do in the future).

 

A good local fitter will be best able to help you make the selection to best suit your needs as they will understand the slopes that you have been skiing and are referencing.  Don't be scared of new old stock, if it fits and meets the requirements. (You can also save a few dollars by going this route).

post #6 of 7

Welcome to EpicSki.  Nobody here or anywhere else on the internet can recommend a boot for you.  Every boot you mention is made by a reputable company which will probably have a boot that fits your foot.  Read this article, http://www.epicski.com/a/ski-boots-the-most-important-piece-of-gear-you-will-own and then go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read the wikis about fitting and terminology.  After that you will have a much better understanding of how a ski boot should fit, and it certainly isn't the way your street shoes or hiking boots fit.  IIRC, boot fitters are nearly non-existent in Europe, except in Britain.  When you go to a ski shop, if they don't do a shell fit(you will learn what that is), you will need to take the lead on finding a boot that actually fits your foot.  If there is more than one ski shop, go to several because you may find one where they actually know how to properly fit you with boots.

 

One last piece of advice and that is, if a boot feels comfortable when you first try it on, it is too big, guaranteed, and no amount of tightening the buckles can make up for a boot being too big.  A boot that is too big can and probably will seriously hinder your progress.

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks everybody for valuable advice. It took for a while to try many different ski boots in many different shops. And I have found that for my foot best fit is Rossignol Alias Sensor 90. These boots have wide last, high instep, and wide ankle area and have very good tight fit for my foot. Right foot sits very tightly and left a bit looser as it is a bit smaller. I have tried these boots a week ago in Druskininkai Snow Arena in Lithuania for a couple of days. And wow! Much better control and easier skiing and less load on my legs with these boots as compared to those that I have used to rent. Very happy with my new gear! And thanks again! smile.gif

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Help choose my first ski boots