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Longest Run on East of the USA ski areas

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

What resorts on the East of the USA like Vermont etc or any other eastern state. Has the longest runs in that area?

What would be the longest run on the east?

 

What qualities do you get in skiing in the east that you don't get skiing on West side like colorado or BC in Canada?

thanks

post #2 of 23

The longest run in the east is an easy trail at Killington, Juggernaut which is a little more than 6 miles long.
 

post #3 of 23

The problem with these routes that meander around is they are not much different than cross country skiing sometimes.  Longer is not always something to look for in a ski trail.  Certainly nice for scenic exploration and maybe checking out other trails, but most of these endless things get old fast.

post #4 of 23

I actually do that one from time to time (every 2 or 3 years) and if you have a decent wax and know where to pick up speed, you can do that trail without much real skating or climbing. But I would not do it on a slow snow day or it would be much more work than it is worth. I do it mostly because I enjoyed it when I first started skiing and it is a nice memory refresher.

post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by world-traveller123 View Post

What resorts on the East of the USA like Vermont etc or any other eastern state. Has the longest runs in that area?

What would be the longest run on the east?

 

What qualities do you get in skiing in the east that you don't get skiing on West side like colorado or BC in Canada?

thanks

 

As others have mentioned, Juggernaut is by far the longest trail in the East.  Most areas have a long, long beginner run from the top.  Some of them are actually pretty fun.

 

As for what you get in the east.  The sarcastic answer is that you get crowds, ice and bitter cold January days.

 

What I think one of the "defining characteristics" about skiing in New England is the "classic, narrow, winding New England trail".  New England ski areas tend to be raked by the wind, and snow fall can be scarce, so the original trails were cut to be narrow and winding to shelter them from the sun and wind as much as possible.  Most trails have long since been widened to accommodate snow making, grooming, etc., but there are a few left, and the ones that are left are flat-out fun.

post #6 of 23

I remember the green trail from the top of Tremblant being pretty long and nice. I'd check that out. Going by memory however.

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

 The sarcastic answer is that you get crowds, ice and bitter cold January days.

 

I don't think that's being sarcastic.

post #8 of 23

Clearly the long runout trails at Killington are the longest in the east, but they are boring and you actually are begging for them to end.  One can ski top to bottom at most eastern areas, bu tit usually involves some flats and even some walking.  I was able to ski top-to-bottom at Gore two years ago and having said that I did it, I don't need to do it again.  It was fun in a strange way.  Perhaps the longest top-to-bottom steep hard trails are the front four or five at Stowe.  

post #9 of 23

I would guess that the longest real top to bottom of worthwhile skiing is at Whiteface where you can combine either Skyward with Upper Valley and then the trails back to the lodge.
 

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

I would guess that the longest real top to bottom of worthwhile skiing is at Whiteface where you can combine either Skyward with Upper Valley and then the trails back to the lodge.
 

+1

post #11 of 23
Polecat at Wildcat in NH is, imho, the best LONG eastern run that is also legitimately fun to ski for non beginners.
post #12 of 23

+2

post #13 of 23

For a long trail with some challenge. Antelope at MRG goes on for what seems like forever. Starts at the top as a blue, then becomes a black trail for the bottom 2/3. I have no idea how long it is, maybe someone here does.

 

I made the mistake of skiing juggernaut at K-town once and was ready to kill myself at the halfway point. Good way to kill a lot of time on the hill.

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by bplatt03443 View Post

For a long trail with some challenge. Antelope at MRG goes on for what seems like forever. Starts at the top as a blue, then becomes a black trail for the bottom 2/3.

 

Agreed. That is a really good one (quantity + quality).

post #15 of 23

I skied it once during a long trip when my legs were shot and I was hungover and I was skiing like crap that day, but I thought Toll Road at Stowe was not that bad. Fun little trek through the woods. Skied it mid week. I don't recall having to pole at all. Was I still drunk?
 

post #16 of 23

+100 on Antelope. That is one great trail.

post #17 of 23
Quote:

What qualities do you get in skiing in the east that you don't get skiing on West side like colorado or BC in Canada?

thanks

 

Tight trees, tough tight technical lines (rocks, stumps, logs, cruxes, frozen waterfalls, running streams, harder snow, trees in jump run-outs, random moose. Or meese? Or mooses?) Less worries for avalanches. Less risk of sighting Paris Hilton, Hugh Grant, Mel Gibson, Oprah or Dr. Phil. Real maple syrup. Crazy Quebecois. And Quebecoise. biggrin.gif Greater chance of sighting BWPA. Less earthquakes, but more hurricanes. Better ski tuners. More likely to remember if it's Egan, Egane, or Eagan. Or Egads. The Meatheads. Better lobsters and clam chowder and crabs. Nearer the Hockey Hall of Fame. Sun rises here first, so we're skiing before the West! Better craft brews. No Texans on the slopes. No I-70 to get to the slopes.

post #18 of 23

For a nice long trail in Killington that you dont have to walk or push yourself, I would recommend Great Eastern.It is 3.3 miles long with a 3000 foot vertical drop. A couple of sections get flat but if you maintain your speed you should cruise over these. This trail also has low skier traffic and leads down to the less crowded Skye Peak Gondola.

post #19 of 23

Sugar's got a mostly blue top to bottom that's 1.5 miles.  It does flatten out to green at the bottom.  Black to blue options are closer to just under a mile.

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnL View Post

Quote:

What qualities do you get in skiing in the east that you don't get skiing on West side like colorado or BC in Canada?

thanks

 

Tight trees, tough tight technical lines (rocks, stumps, logs, cruxes, frozen waterfalls, running streams, harder snow, trees in jump run-outs, random moose. Or meese? Or mooses?) Less worries for avalanches. Less risk of sighting Paris Hilton, Hugh Grant, Mel Gibson, Oprah or Dr. Phil. Real maple syrup. Crazy Quebecois. And Quebecoise. biggrin.gif Greater chance of sighting BWPA. Less earthquakes, but more hurricanes. Better ski tuners. More likely to remember if it's Egan, Egane, or Eagan. Or Egads. The Meatheads. Better lobsters and clam chowder and crabs. Nearer the Hockey Hall of Fame. Sun rises here first, so we're skiing before the West! Better craft brews. No Texans on the slopes. No I-70 to get to the slopes.

I think those of us in Montana and Oregon would argue strongly about the East having better craft brews.  Also, there are plenty of tight trees here in Montana as well.  I'll give you the clam chowder and maple syrup.  

post #21 of 23

This website lists their version of the vertical drop for ski areas. It's criteria is what is the most vertical feet you can cover uninterrupted. So for example a mountain may have two peaks. Peak A is 8000' high, Peak B is 8300' high. Peak A's base is 6500' and Peak B's is 7000'. So in theory the resort will say they have an 1800' drop, but because it is across different peaks that they get that number you can't ski the full length. The linked site works out the longest you can run on one continuous run. 

 

Their answer for eastern US is Whiteface at 3216 feet. Followed by Sugarbush at 2552' and Sugarloaf at 2410'. Killington lists 3000', but that is where the multi-peak thing comes in. They only have a continuously skiable vertical of 1645 feet (running off the K1 Gondola). 

post #22 of 23

I was lucky enough to ski Killington's Grest Eastern on a fast icy day.  Ony long, epic run for New England.

post #23 of 23

if you want a x-c trail Killington has that market covered.

 

Whiteface has a 2.5 mile Blue trail with some long sections that would be black at other resorts

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