EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Any tricks to battle vertigo on the hill?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Any tricks to battle vertigo on the hill?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Usually hits me about once a year when skiing white-out conditions.  Would like to hear tips for prevention, as well as anyone's tips for speeding recovery once it occurs.  Kind of hate to admit defeat on those days, as the snow can be great.  Thoughts?

post #2 of 12
Ski in the trees or along a tree line. Or, you could do what I do and just go straight until you hit something.
post #3 of 12

 Is it the dizziness your trying to cure, the feeling sick that goes with it or both?

 I usually concentrate on a fixed point when I can SEE something to fix on. I pretend to see a fixed point when its whiteout as looking down induces the losing balance feeling. Unfortunately that does mean I have no idea whats under foot. That can be fun tho.I tend to avoid steeps in whiteout conditions because of that though.

 In terms of avoiding feeling ill with it try travel sickness tablets, prochlorperazine? or use "sea bands" they are freely available in pharmacies in the UK quite cheaply, if your not familiar with them they are a band that goes round your wrist which act on a specific pressure point to help with nausea. I was sceptical but they really work. I'm sure you'll find them or a similar product near you or via google.

post #4 of 12

I don't know how severe your vertigo is.

 

For me, as long as there's ANY fix landmark I can look at, I'm fine. I would fix my glaze on either a faint image of lift tower or the outline of a shed down at the bottom of the slope, and ignore the stuff flying about me.

 

The worst thing to do is look down at your feet. Trying to "see" the slope itself will also induce vertigo without fail.

 

If it gets so bad I can't see a thing at all, I stay at the lodge.

post #5 of 12

Try to follow another person so you can focus on their jacket or anything not white.

 

Stay near the tree line or in the trees.

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback.  I think I'll make it a point to carry some motion sickness meds while skiing and see if that helps.   As long as I have some stationary object within vision, I'm usually OK.  Once we hit pea soup status though, the vertigo comes on very fast and I'm both dizzy and sick.  Finding some trees to ski tends to help me get down the hill at that point, but then it's a couple hrs in the lodge to recover.  Trying to follow another skier in those conditions hasn't helped at all -- I'm guessing because we're both moving independently.     

post #7 of 12

If you get appropriate open space and a partner/spotter, practicing skiing with your eyes closed can help.  Also, getting in some steep, exposed hikes or climbs in similar conditions off of snow can help a lot to get used to the lack of visual reference as well, just try not to get hit by lightning in the process.

post #8 of 12

Bonine.

 

Doesn't have the sleepiness of Dramamine.

 

It can also be taken for relief once the motion sickness starts.

 

BUT....you should try it our BEFORE you need it. It may make you see dragons, who knows?

 

Better to find that out before you're on the hill.

post #9 of 12

Both my wife and father in law suffer from vertigo.

 

There are some exercises you can do to "rebalance your inner ear crystals".  I know that sounds like some hippy made up BS, but look it up.

 

Also, there are certain... umm... herbal solutions that supposedly do the trick as well, if you're into that sort of thing.

post #10 of 12

Meclizine.

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

Also, there are certain... umm... herbal solutions that supposedly do the trick as well, if you're into that sort of thing.

I like the sound of that. And I'm heading to CO tomorrow. Bonus!

post #12 of 12

Short of getting out of the fog, skiing trees is probably the best suggestion to minimize the feeling. If your concern is more around "feeling" your movement, drag your baskets (with some pressure on the baskets) while maintaining an athletic stance. In doing so, you will at least feel the slope and which direction you're sliding in. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lilywhite View Post

use "sea bands" they are freely available in pharmacies in the UK quite cheaply, if your not familiar with them they are a band that goes round your wrist which act on a specific pressure point to help with nausea. 

 

Sea band effectiveness is not substantiated through any peer-reviewed research. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Any tricks to battle vertigo on the hill?