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Most unusual trail - Page 2

post #31 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 

I think the Bench kind of does qualify. The trail below it "Angel Food" is actually the original Chin Clip trail. If you look at a really old trail map from before the first Gondi went in, that's exactly where it would be, and when you ski it you can still feel the old trail.

 

Wow, so the original Chin Clip was more directly below the Chin then the current one is.

 

I had assumed that the "no snowmaking" trails of New England are more-or-less unchanged from how they were first cut, but I've been learning that's far from the case.

post #32 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post

 

Wow, so the original Chin Clip was more directly below the Chin then the current one is.

 

I had assumed that the "no snowmaking" trails of New England are more-or-less unchanged from how they were first cut, but I've been learning that's far from the case.

 

Yep, Goat was totally different too. I think you've probably skied it's old parts. I think it ended on Nosedive.

post #33 of 84

I skied that Catamount trail last season.  Fun sort of roller coasterish and bob sled coursish.  

 

At Gore Mt. NY there is a glade called The Cirque that is like taking a little half hour adventure ride through the woods.  You start out at a steep narrow section next to a cliff wall, then follow a narrow path , single file, for a bit before it opens up for some glade skiing then off on the path again and so on.

 

at Sugarbush, Rumble, off the Castlerock chair, is just the narrowest, steep, twisty turny trail I know of.

 

At Park City I remember a frozen Creek bed not on the trail map that was called Doobie Hollow. A fun and harrowing ride down made even more dangerous due to the fact that xc skiers liked to work their way up it.

 

At Vail there is a cool section of a trail off of the Blue Sky basin area that forms a natural half pipe.  I have no idea what they call it but it is fun.


Edited by crank - 12/18/12 at 7:17pm
post #34 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 

I think the Bench kind of does qualify. The trail below it "Angel Food" is actually the original Chin Clip trail. If you look at a really old trail map from before the first Gondi went in, that's exactly where it would be, and when you ski it you can still feel the old trail.

Not able to find Angel Food tho I don't have an old trail map. Are you referring to the current Chin Clip Runout or a part of Switchback?

Or is it now the wooded section skiers left of Chin clip?

post #35 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post

I skied that Catamount trail last season.  Fun sort of roller coasterish and bob sled coursish.  

 

At Gore Mt. NY there is a glade called The Cirque that is like taking a little half hour adventure ride through the woods.  You start out at a steep narrow section next to a cliff wall, then follow a narrow path , single file, for a bit before it opens up for some glade skiing then off on the patch again and so on.

 

at Sugarbush, Rumble, off the Castlerock chair, is just the narrowest, steep, twisty turn trail I know of.

 

At Park City I remember a frozen Creek bed not on the trail map that was called Doobie Hollow. A fun and harrowing ride down made even more dangerous due to the fact that xc skiers liked to work their way up it.

 

At Vail there is a cool section of a trail off of the Blue Sky basin area that forms a natural half pipe.  I have no idea what they call it but it is fun.

Just bought the Gore "Awesome Pack" so I'll try the Cirque this year, thanks.

Good call on Rumble, it definitely fits.

I've skied that natural halfpipe at Blue Sky Basin. There is a lot to explore in there.

post #36 of 84

Heli Skiing up at Mike Wiegele Heli Skiing in Canada, there is a run called Heaven's Gate.  The skiing is o.k. what makes it so unusual is the trees are covered in thick ice on both sides of a narrow trail.  On a sunny day everything sparkles, very other worldly. 

post #37 of 84

Angel Food is what the trail from the bench is called. It is pretty far away from Chin Clip as we know it today.

 

post #38 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

 

Yep, Goat was totally different too. I think you've probably skied it's old parts. I think it ended on Nosedive.

My step brother was on the National ski Patrol at Stowe in the late 60's and early 70's.

He told me that Goat had a VERY narrow entrance, and was widened up top in the mid 70's.

Not sure about ending on Nosedive. I'll ask him.

post #39 of 84
Thread Starter 

very cool epic. I see Bruce Trail is listed as # 8. Looks like it runs off the back side of Mt. Mansfield initially, as it

is west of Toll road.

I'm not locating the Bench though. Does it have a number? Or near which number?

post #40 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post

very cool epic. I see Bruce Trail is listed as # 8. Looks like it runs off the back side of Mt. Mansfield initially, as it

is west of Toll road.

I'm not locating the Bench though. Does it have a number? Or near which number?


The bench itself is just a fallen log. It's at the top of trail #1 Chin Clip (what we now call Angel Food) as shown on that map.

post #41 of 84

Nice map epic , can really see why it is called Goat

post #42 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post

Nice map epic , can really see why it is called Goat

 

When you think about how narrow Goat currently is, and then you think about how much narrower "original" Goat was, and then you realize that they were doing this with leather boots and wooden skis...  eek.gif  Those guys had some mad skills!

post #43 of 84

Yuup, Rumble at the Bush, my old home resort, and Paradise over at MRG....if you can find it.

 

Just finding Rumble can be a challenge for first timers. When it gets bumped-up just getting in the "door" will test your nerve as you are met with a lefty coming into the entry and a slurving righhander into the counter-sloped pitch with trees. We use to ski this thing with 210s.

 

If you have to ask "where do those tracks go" at MRG you are probably closing in on Paradise. We use to ski that with 210s on as well...we were pretty sick 20 years ago. Still not sure where it is, the map doesn't help, then ask someone, but don't go alone. I've had strong skiers wimp out on Freefall there. NJoy the trip to the Mad River Valley, and don't forget to ask for the trees.

post #44 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by snokat View Post

Yuup, Rumble at the Bush, my old home resort, and Paradise over at MRG....if you can find it.

 

Just finding Rumble can be a challenge for first timers. When it gets bumped-up just getting in the "door" will test your nerve as you are met with a lefty coming into the entry and a slurving righhander into the counter-sloped pitch with trees. We use to ski this thing with 210s.

 

If you have to ask "where do those tracks go" at MRG you are probably closing in on Paradise. We use to ski that with 210s on as well...we were pretty sick 20 years ago. Still not sure where it is, the map doesn't help, then ask someone, but don't go alone. I've had strong skiers wimp out on Freefall there. NJoy the trip to the Mad River Valley, and don't forget to ask for the trees.

 

I don't ski Sugarbush that much, but I've never made it to Castlerock when Rumble looked like anything other then a good way to core shot your skis within about five turns.  One of these days...  John Egan sure makes it look fun:

 

post #45 of 84

I do actually remember thinking to myself "This is a weird trail," when I was on Tin Woodsman at Sunday River. The main reason is because it's bordered by full trees, but it has some random patches of bare tree trunks that stick up. It in no way can be called a glade, it just has a few big logs sticking out in random places. At one point I skied over to one of these patches and discovered that it was kind of a sheer drop down past it, so backtracked. The trail was fun (they'd gotten like 2 feet of snow in the course of that weekend haha) but it does stick out in my memory as a trail I found bizarre :) I think I figured, if you're going to make a big wide groomer, might as well get rid of all the obstacles!

post #46 of 84
Quote:
JohnL  All the above bolded section is still there on the Allen, we have tended to call it Death Valley, they widened out the top skiers left to accomandate the safety needs for running GS these days. But you can still ski the death valley side the same way, it has not changed at least from 1992, yes the trees at the bottom of trail with the divot is gone but one can still launch some serious air from the ridge thats left. Proctor is unchanged.

 

Sowlbowler,

 

Last skiied there in ~2007. Allen slope is a looot different from the 70's (I have a ~25 year gap of not skiing the Snow Bowl from ~1984-2007. I think they also did some changes in the early 80s.) A few of the older features are (~2007) there to a small extent, but nowhere near as prominent. It appears to me they also did a lot of regrading of the middle sections of the trail. Plus, grooming has also change the trail. If memory serves correct (if may not be 100 percent correct), I don't think they ever groomed the top part of the trail (too steep for equipment back then.)

 

But as you know, memory is not 100 percent correct.

 

The trail that changed the most has been the Ross Trail. Upper part belonged at Mad River Glen. Lower part was a massive bump fest (when not groomed for races.)
 

post #47 of 84
Quote:
Olympic lift? Although it didn't go all the way to broadway.  From 1993-http://skimap.org/data/1032/7/1269220001.jpg

 

Yep. Found the old trail maps. That was my second trip out West, so my definition of steep has changed a bit then. Thinking some more, don't think the lift went over cliffs, just the Double Blacks of Olympic Bowl. With a long run to the valley below that. Still, a scary view down with the chairlift bar up. And Broadway was above that, accessed via the (now reconfigured)  Loge Peak lift.

 

Still, to me, Broadway remains a different trail. Not exactly a knife's edge, but with serious drops off to either side (with one section protected by a snow bank.) But it is a narrow blue trail (almost a cat track) that continues down to access more blue trails, with access to double blacks off either side.
 

post #48 of 84

Fun reading and great thread idea.  I could go on a lot on this topic and I equate unusual with good.

Trying to be concise...

-Sentimentally, Stembogen at Blue Knob, PA has a little bit of everything including sharp banked turns with multiple fall lines, flat-ish switchbacks between turns, skiable gladed terrain off the side of the trail that can be sampled when natural snow is good, has a bowl-like section at the start and a wide-open powder field at finish.

Scenes on or overlooking Stembogen Trail:

 

800x600px-LL-DSCF3325.JPG

 

-Last year I skied Muleskinner at Saddleback, ME for first time, fun, narrow, twisty, extraodinarily scenic trail.  Cameras on fritz, but here is a link I found to an old trip report on Firsttracks with some pics (doesn't show great lake views):  http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?t=703&highlight=saddleback

 

-Not probably unusual for the west, but I thought the gnarly trees and beautiful rocks of Catherine's area at Alta are very special.  This is either So Long or Last Chance trail:

 

-For a little hill (~1100' vert) Black Mtn, NH has some unusual terrain including very challenging glades, little cliff drops, much of it ungroomed.  This is below a natural feature called Hanger Cliff:

 

Lower FIS at Sugerbush is similar to Lower Antelope at MRG, long, lonely single black bump runs that convey a feeling of isolation/exploration even though lift served.

 

As mentioned by others, the network of beautiful glades at MRG is unusual in a very GOOD way.  Paradise Glade:

 

Aforementioned Honeycomb Canyon at Solitude, UT, is a big area of lift served side-country that is real pretty:

 

The entire atmosphere around Le Massif in Quebec, Canada is very unusual for its setting next to the St Lawrence Seaway, which is practically like an ocean there.

 

Lunch is over, much call it quits now. 

post #49 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnL View Post

 

Sowlbowler,

 

Last skiied there in ~2007. Allen slope is a looot different from the 70's (I have a ~25 year gap of not skiing the Snow Bowl from ~1984-2007. I think they also did some changes in the early 80s.) A few of the older features are (~2007) there to a small extent, but nowhere near as prominent. It appears to me they also did a lot of regrading of the middle sections of the trail. Plus, grooming has also change the trail. If memory serves correct (if may not be 100 percent correct), I don't think they ever groomed the top part of the trail (too steep for equipment back then.)

 

But as you know, memory is not 100 percent correct.

 

The trail that changed the most has been the Ross Trail. Upper part belonged at Mad River Glen. Lower part was a massive bump fest (when not groomed for races.)
 

I can only dream about bumps on that trail, maybe a few late in the year after Carnival on skiers left towards the bottom but for 99.9% of the time it is a groomer zoomer, but you have to be careful at the bottom because if you are not looking far enough ahead you'll get launched off a roll that turns to the right. Loved to have seen the top of the Ross back in the day. Have hiked that in the summer and oh man is that steep.

post #50 of 84

 For all of you that get a chance to ski Revelstoke Mtn Resort in British Columbia for the first time there is a way back to the stoke chair.  From the the top of the stoke chair, go to skiers left there are runs like Jalapeno,Hot Sauce,Roller Coaster  ,Devils Club or you can boot pack into the south bowl where they used to cat ski ,yes cat ski, its on the other side of the ropes but its there. When you come down off any of the runs i have mentioned you come out on the cat track called the Last Chance, your legs will be ripping with pain at this point .There is the ninja trail or head for the day lodge one of the longest and most physical demanding runs you can make on the hill approx just under a mile do that twice a day and your in good condition for almost anything or if you keep your eyes open you my find the ninja trail which takes your from the last chance cat track to the base of the stoke chair . It traverses hard right over runs like Fast Freds ,Snow Rodeo and Pitch Black and puts you back at the bottom of the stoke chair .one of the most demanding traverses you will ever do ,zipping along a three foot trail with ups ,downs ,trees ,gullies  deep snow no room to really turn or stop  but will make your ski adventure like no other on MacKenzie Mtn . Doing laps on the stoke chair from any of these runs is mostly a powder adventure not for beginners so look for the ninja trail if your up there ,

post #51 of 84

The ninja trail

1000

1000

the top of the stoke chair

1000

more of the ninja trail

1000

 some cool stuff

post #52 of 84
Thread Starter 

Had not thought of this before. You guys have caused me to create a skiers bucket list.

Videos & pics!!

post #53 of 84
Quote:
Ridge Run at Catamount. Truly a roller coaster, it constantly goes up and down multiple times in often short distances.

 

How early do they typically open Ridge Run? I'm assuming no, but any chance of it being open this Monday AM?

 

BTW, great thread. I'm surprised it took until page two for Rumble to be mentioned. It's almost a cliche for these types of threads.

post #54 of 84
Thread Starter 

 In 2003 I skied Chamonix France for a week.

For those who have not skied in Europe, if I were to use a single word description, it would be vast. There is so

much terrain. Distance and depth perception suffer at first glance as there are less trees and shadows.

In addition to a 6 day pass which could be used at 4 areas, everyone received 1 ride on the Les Grand Montets Tram.

How about a trail that takes 1/2 a day, 5 hours including lunch? This was an unusually long journey.

 

In the morning it took 2 chair lift rides to get to the Les Grand Montets Tram. We waited 1.5 hours in line before

we left 2000 meters on our way to 3300 meters, but what looked like many miles away. Below is a photo from the

top which gives you an idea

 

http://i359.photobucket.com/albums/oo38/JSLincks/LesGrandMontetsSummit.jpg

A warning about staying away from the glacier and crevasses

 

http://i359.photobucket.com/albums/oo38/JSLincks/LesGrandMontetsWarning.jpg

The long ski journey is ahead of us

http://i359.photobucket.com/albums/oo38/JSLincks/LesGrandMontetsJourney.jpg

 

Here is why to stay on the trail

 

http://i359.photobucket.com/albums/oo38/JSLincks/LesGrandMontetsGlacier2.jpg

After two hours we reach the only lunch spot. Access for proprietors is by dog sled or snowmobile only

http://i359.photobucket.com/albums/oo38/JSLincks/LesGrandMontetsLunch.jpg

http://i359.photobucket.com/albums/oo38/JSLincks/LesGrandMontetsLunch2.jpg

After two more hours of skiing we reach a pub in the woods

http://i359.photobucket.com/albums/oo38/JSLincks/LesGrandMontetsApre.jpg


Edited by JSLincks - 12/19/12 at 7:50pm
post #55 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

 

Gunbarrel at Monarch is one of the few examples of an orphaned run, one that was formerly lift served but now requires a hike to ski. A rope tow was built up the run as Monarch's original uphill conveyance.  When a chairlift was run to a point about a mile away that allowed skiers to access most of the cut trails by skiing down from another lift, the rope tow was removed (the upper wood terminal remains), but skiers have to hike the final rise to ski Gunbarrel.

 

 

 

I love Gunbarrel.  Never groomed, but it is difficult enough to get to that I have never seen it skied enough to get really bumped up either.  

post #56 of 84

Probably Gothic at Jackson. It's essentially a 15 footer to a straightline narrow couloir ... it's pretty simple and short, but standing above it gave me serious butterflies and you always wonder 'what if I smack?"

 

I've always wanted to ski Central too - it's pretty unusual in the sense that it has the rocky crux in the middle and the mandatory air out. Never really had enough snow when I've been though :(

post #57 of 84

In Norway none of the more spectacular ungroomed trails are on the trailmap for reasons I explained in another thread so I have nothing to report from this part of the world:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/115939/judge-rules-that-vail-resorts-can-be-sued-for-avalanche-death/30

 

On the club fields of New Zealand however there are plenty of spectacular trails on the trailmap and no groomers. They don't have proper lifts either, just ropes on pulleys powered by tractor engines that one connects to with climbing harnesses and a ropebrake device called a nutcracker.  They do have lots of good terrain and a decent amount of vertical fall. Craigeburn has 500 m vertical fall and all of it is above treeline.

 

http://wikiski.com/wiki/index.php/File:Craigieburn_broken_river_map.jpg

 

The most memorable trail that comes to mind is 210 at Craigeburn. Named 210 cause it is supposed to be 210 cm at it's narrowest point. Difficulty rating triple black diamond. The description on the trailmap says


black diamond: expert
double: tricky
Triple: suicidal

 

Not that bad in good snow though. I tried it once more after it had been bumped out, rained on and then frozen and not thawed. Only did that once.... That was not pretty skiing ;)
It is one of the chutes in this picture. Notice the nice placement of the logde at the col:

 

1000

 

I think this picture is looking up at the last section from below:

 

1000

 


I really want to get back to the clubfields once and hope they don't change before I get the chance to ski there again.
 

post #58 of 84

Another trail I thought of is Cathedral Brook at Belleayre, NY. It's at the far skier's right of the resort and the longest double-black there. It's ungroomed and pretty fun, bumpy and all natural - I seem to remember having to dodge patches of dirt and rock when I rode it.

 

What makes it unusual is that I ran into a 90-degree turn uphill the one time I did it. I saw some tracks that continued down the fall line into the woods. It seemed much better than hiking uphill (WTF is there an ascent on a ski run?), but it just led deeper into the woods. I ran into a young kid (~12 years old) and we started hiking, figuring that we'd find a way out somewhere. We got to what looked like a clearing with a house on the other side, so we were thinking we could at least find civilization and make a phone call. But then we realized the clearing was really a half frozen lake/pond and it would be a rather long, crappy hike around the shore to get there. The kid started panicking and crying. I talked him up and we eventually found our way back to a trail at the resort.

 

I never did the trail again, so I still don't know if I took a wrong turn when I came to that hill or if it's just a weird trail. It looks like there's a glade next to the upper section now, so it's probably pretty fun. Anyone else know what I'm talking about?

post #59 of 84
Thread Starter 

Yes I have skied Cathedral Brook at Belleayre. It depends how you accessed the trail. If you get off the Super Chief, (high speed quad) go left and follow

the Novice trail (think it's Ridge Run) down to where it makes a sharp turn left ... that is one entrance through the fence (the trail is marked Cathedral Glade at this entrance). When you enter there, you miss a 100 to 150 yard upper portion of the trail which is the steepest. To gain access to the top of the trail, you need to get off the Super Chief, go straight towards the back side of Belleayre Mountain and then take a parallel trail to Ridge Run. This is actually (I believe) an unmarked hiking trail which goes to a lean-to (three sided structure with roof) which is part of a hiking trail network. I have slept overnight at that lean to in the summer during a two day backpacking trip.

This is the begininng of Cathedral Brook Trail (at the lean to). If you ventured further into the woods? I know of no house back there, but I have seen snowboarders go further in the woods during heavy snowfall, but honestly, it is pretty thick back there with underbrush. And yes there is one point where you have to pole uphill or take off your skis and walk to get to the lean-to.

post #60 of 84

Black Forest at Snowbird, Its the most rollercoastered run I have ever been on! It goes up and down and has multiple burns and drops to go off of. Its really fun the day after a storm when the snow is really soft.

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