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Poll: Powder day on a work day - what to do?

Poll Results: Powder day on a work day - what to do?

 
  • 16% (6)
    Go to work to make money to ski on the weekend.
  • 30% (11)
    Take a vacation day.
  • 2% (1)
    Call in sick.
  • 5% (2)
    Call in to say that you need to deal with some kind of a vague last minute appointment and that you will make up the hours later.
  • 27% (10)
    Just be honest and call in with a "Powder Day" and say you will make up the hours later.
  • 5% (2)
    I don't have a job.
  • 11% (4)
    I work at the ski hill. I'll do both.
36 Total Votes  
post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I'm interested in knowing what people actually do.

post #2 of 25

Have already told my manager to expect me to be late whenever we get any appreciable snowfall - say over 6".  Our workplace allows for a flexible schedule as long as personal work commitments are met.

 

But being here in upstate NY where no snow ever falls anymore, it doesn't make a difference.

post #3 of 25

Some resort towns in B.C. have an unofficial 15cm (6") rule, people don't show up for work and some businesses don't open until 11am or noon.

post #4 of 25

I work from 6 am til 3:30 in the afternoon so I'll go to work, check the snow reports, road conditions etc.

 

If it looks like LCC is open, I'll head up to Alta about 10 am or so.  I will use vacation time to do this.

 

My boss understands that I will be in a much better mood the next day if he just lets me go. (Plus I wouldn't ge much done at work, staring at the Web Cams and moping around)

 

I'm afraid I'll break a leg or something if I call in "sick".  (Karma's a bitch!)

post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jxb View Post

I work from 6 am til 3:30 in the afternoon so I'll go to work, check the snow reports, road conditions etc.

 

If it looks like LCC is open, I'll head up to Alta about 10 am or so.  I will use vacation time to do this.

 

My boss understands that I will be in a much better mood the next day if he just lets me go. (Plus I wouldn't ge much done at work, staring at the Web Cams and moping around)

 

I'm afraid I'll break a leg or something if I call in "sick".  (Karma's a bitch!)

 

Or get a google tan.

post #6 of 25
Quot

Or get a google tan.

 

Quote:
I'm afraid I'll break a leg or something if I call in "sick".  (Karma's a bitch!)

 

I never call in sick. The goggle tan is the main worry.

 

But I've used the "vague last minute appointment" excuse. Though that was a long time ago when I was working as a slave (academic).

 

Now I'm not getting paid when I'm not working, my boss knows if I'm taking a day off, it's because I REALLY, REALLY want the day off. Whatever my reason, he (or she) couldn't care less! I usually tell the truth. 

post #7 of 25

I have always been lucky as I was in sales and set my own appointments.  So if there was a powder day I would look at my schedule and if it wasn't a key customer, I would just call and reschedule the appointment.  If they knew me well enough they knew what I was doing.

 

Funny story, later in my career I had my own mfg rep agency and had a couple of reps who worked for me, one a skier.  On one of those Western PA powder days I cleared my schedule and headed up to 7 Springs where I had a season pass.  Anyway, after a couple of runs I get on  the chair with 3 ladies giving a nice cheery "Hello, great day isn't it?"  of course they replied "Yes" but one of the "Yes's" sounded familiar, I take a look and it is my rep the skier.  She looks at me and says, I can't get in trouble if you are here too.  We had a good laugh!  Of course I understood.

 

Rick G

post #8 of 25

Responses are going to greatly depend on the nature of a person's job.  There are of course quite a lot of non-professional occupations, especially those where pay is mediocre, where that can be rather common.   However most professional career people working for corporations, almost never call in sick when they are not sick or make lame excuses on days they roll over feeling tired and don't feel like working or much less decide to go skiing because of fresh powder or golfing because its sunny.   It is true a modest number of twenty somethings yet unfamiliar with adult workplaces pull such tricks.   Especially those who used to do the same in high school.  But if such happens more than extremely infrequently, most human resource departments who regularly monitor all employee daily attendance records, are quick to take action by putting pressure on any managers to get to the bottom of whatever.   Usual is the person that supposedly has a several one-day "upset" sicknesses where they come into work following days apparently looking normal without a cold or flu.

post #9 of 25

Unless I'm up against a deadline, I'll take the morning and go skiing. And I do have a professional job.

 

It's Nelson.

 

I might see my employer up there. Not a problem.

post #10 of 25

1000

post #11 of 25

I chose Just be honest and call in with a "Powder Day" and say you will make up the hours later. because my boss is a great guy and understands. wink.gif I never make appointments before noon in the winter so I'm not going to miss one if I go skiing in the morning. When clients call me, they will ask if I'm out skiing and let me know that it can wait.

post #12 of 25

i prefer it when the governor just closes the state and we can all go, excecpt he really only does that when people are dying around the capital; governor seems less concerned when its merely the state's rural residents are dying on the public roadways.  beyond that, don't care what i have to do to get to the snow, whether it be by hook, crook, or a llittle exaggeration of the truth!

post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave_SSS View Post

However most professional career people working for corporations, almost never call in sick when they are not sick or make lame excuses on days they roll over feeling tired and don't feel like working or much less decide to go skiing because of fresh powder or golfing because its sunny.   It is true a modest number of twenty somethings yet unfamiliar with adult workplaces pull such tricks.   Especially those who used to do the same in high school.  But if such happens more than extremely infrequently, most human resource departments who regularly monitor all employee daily attendance records, are quick to take action by putting pressure on any managers to get to the bottom of whatever.   Usual is the person that supposedly has a several one-day "upset" sicknesses where they come into work following days apparently looking normal without a cold or flu.

You must work in HR!

 

"Professionals" DO call in sick when they are not sick. I know plenty of people who do that. There's a really big motivation for doing that: sick days are PAID!!! Vacation days, well, they just used up their vacation.

 

As for lame excuse, that's up for interpretation. If the kid is sick, is that a lame excuse or legit excuse? How's the boss able to tell if that's true or not? No way, period.

 

HR think they're super-important. They're routinely got brushed aside by managers! If a "professional" does a good job, he/she can take as many powder days as they like! I even have a manager told me on my first day, that I can take days off without putting it on the time sheet, for as long as I make up the hours and get my work done!

post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jxb View Post
I'm afraid I'll break a leg or something if I call in "sick".  (Karma's a bitch!)

 

 

I'm glad I'm not the only superstitious one.  I plan my weekdays off in advance and take/miss power days as they come. My superstitious nature says unforced deviation invites misfortune.

post #15 of 25

Sold the modern equivalent to buggy whips for over 30 years on a commission basis.  Going in with a company I would make totally clear there would be days when I, "call in well".   When asked to explain that told them; skiing, golf, family, or what ever, but would not let it get in the way.  The hard part was doing lots of winter time trade shows, there was no escape.  The boss always got their pound of sweat and then some, and they knew it.

 

Closed several $500K sales on ski lifts over the phone, which always made the day that much brighter.  Favorite was on the Gondola at Silver Mt. with a bunch of strangers, they just sat there with their mouths open.

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

You must work in HR!

 

What I related is not my opinion of the way I think it ought to be but rather the way most HR groups in my experience even in recent years tend to think.   And no my work is not in HR but rather electronics often engineering.    Have worked for decades in a range of hi tech companies from start up to small, to medium, to our largest.  And have seen the evolution of corporate work places over that time.   Things have changed vastly for the better.

 

"Professionals" DO call in sick when they are not sick. I know plenty of people who do that. There's a really big motivation for doing that: sick days are PAID!!! Vacation days, well, they just used up their vacation.

 

Quite true as I wrote "some" especially in some organizations or with some managers that allow such unofficially.  But that is a minority.    Again much depends on what a person's actual job is about in an organization.  However in most companies down in the ranks of where people are really doing a lot of work as a team, allowing workers to take off whenever they feel like it without warning can be disruptive.  The situation today is vastly more flexible than just a few decades ago when PTO was not a term and vacation and sick pay were quite separate numbers.   Today one can often request PTO at short notice for instance at times work loads allow.   But just  taking off and then labeling it as sick later is likely to get notice from HR in many organizations as it is an old sore subject.  And for those on shaky ground, poor attendance has always been one of the most solid legal excuses companies make for firing workers.

 

As for lame excuse, that's up for interpretation. If the kid is sick, is that a lame excuse or legit excuse? How's the boss able to tell if that's true or not? No way, period.

 

Managers or HR may see the obvious pattern over time of several one day sicknesses where a person appears rather healthy the next day.

 

HR think they're super-important. They're routinely got brushed aside by managers! If a "professional" does a good job, he/she can take as many powder days as they like! I even have a manager told me on my first day, that I can take days off without putting it on the time sheet, for as long as I make up the hours and get my work done!

 

Sure.  Especially if one is important and productive in an organization.     Be glad you work in such a position, have such a boss so, and work in such a company.   But one ought to also be aware there are many  corporations with work situations where workers do not have such relaxed flexibility, especially when they haven't yet earned dues.     If they play such games  when they move into a new job, assuming PTO is possibly like some other place they worked, without carefully sensing a company's culture and what is expected, they may get into trouble. 

 

 

post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 

Lots of honest people here!  No one would call in sick.

 

I wouldn't have a hard time with my boss.  I work hard and often work late at night.  I have a professional salary job.

 

My bigger challenge is with my wife and my colleagues.

 

My wife doesn't have a lot of schedule flexibility and so she may be annoyed if I go of skiing on my own and then need to lock myself in the office and work through the evening.  She'll be even more annoyed if I am then too sore to ski on the weekend.

 

I work in a collaborative team environment and it's important for everyone to pull their weight.  I also have reports and I need to set a positive example.  Very few people in the team ski.  It's one thing for an office to have a "Powder Day" culture but it's different when everyone is taking days off for a large number of different reasons.  It would also be different if I was taking "Powder Days" and no one else was taking days for the hobbies that they were passionate about.  If it became a habit, it could generate issues with teamwork.

post #18 of 25

I answered for my former occupation: teacher.  No way would I call in sick except for my final year before retirement when I did it twice. I was too dedicated to my students and program to think about it.  Now I'm self employed and have ski season mostly off, so I don't have anyone to call in sick to, and I can arrange my schedule as I wish for the most part.

post #19 of 25

I call in 'sick' maybe once (or twice) a season.  Try to hit the most epic day.  Other than that I sit there and stare out the window, watching the weather and web cams, hoping there are still going to be some scraps left.  I really wish I had a slightly flexible schedule.  Even if I could just get a couple hours in on a powder day and make the time up would be awesome.  I'm a salary Engineer at a medium-smal company. 

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve2222 View Post

It would also be different if I was taking "Powder Days" and no one else was taking days for the hobbies that they were passionate about.  If it became a habit, it could generate issues with teamwork.

This used to be my pet peeve when parents can take any day off when their kids are sick and I can't take it off when it snows! There was one job that were like that. So I got "sick" myself a lot in that job. Never got call on it. (I knew HR wasn't looking, because we were all technically "contractors" even though we were all on salary with sick pay) But I guess if the HR were looking at 1 day time off, they'd found a lot of people doing it. Truth being, kids DO get sick a lot more often than powder days! Parents do have to take them to the doctor! If it's disruptive to the team, no one should be allowed to have children!!!

 

Quote:
 for those on shaky ground, poor attendance has always been one of the most solid legal excuses companies make for firing workers.

No one ever got fired any more. They just got "laid off" and never ever got call back!

 

So there's no need for excuse to get rid of someone that are on shaky ground.

 

Quote:

Sure.  Especially if one is important and productive in an organization.     Be glad you work in such a position, have such a boss so, and work in such a company.  

 

These days, if you're not at least somewhat "important" in the organization, you wouldn't have a job in the first place! Any position deem less than "important" has been outsourced to India!

 

Anyone who's clearly unproductive can look forward to being laid off! Good attendence won't make up for being un-productive.

 

Those who are productive, manager really couldn't care less what hour, or for that matter WHERE that productivity came from! If I can get my work done while riding a chair lift, so be it! In fact, one guy (the best guy in our group) once txt in a solution while on the chair lift!!!

 

Quote:

 But one ought to also be aware there are many  corporations with work situations where workers do not have such relaxed flexibility, especially when they haven't yet earned dues.     If they play such games  when they move into a new job, assuming PTO is possibly like some other place they worked, without carefully sensing a company's culture and what is expected, they may get into trouble. 

Best is to clarify that during the interview!

 

The only time I "need" to be in the office 9-5 is when there's not much productive project going on, so everybody is in the office, waiting for the next round of axing! Fortunately, that won't happen for a while in my current job. 

 

There're still a minority of people who believe you need to be there in person to have a discussion. With today's technology, I can be a thousand miles away and still participate fully. 90% of the time, my co-workers IM me even when they only sat in the next cube anyway!

 

When Sandy happened, our company lost 2 buildings due ot flooding. A massive effort was taken to relocate people to the offices that has power. It turned out, very few people need to be IN THE OFFICE! Almost all could work perfectly well from home! (it was a bigger problem during week 1 when most people's home were without power).

 

Quote:

Lots of honest people here!  No one would call in sick.

When people are respected, they behave as respected upstanding citizens. When they were being "watched" like criminals, they act like criminals.

 

HR "watch" people as criminal suspects. Good managers treat their worker as professionals. Knowing how HR look at these things, most managers won't even report such absents to the HR so they don't lose a good, productive worker!

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

When people are respected, they behave as respected upstanding citizens. When they were being "watched" like criminals, they act like criminals.

 

 

If they have the work ethic of a spoiled teenager maybe. 

post #22 of 25

I work on the hill, so I can usually get a bit of both smile.gif.

JF

post #23 of 25
I have a flexible schedule so I work around low pressure systems. In emergencies I have told clients in places like NYC that " we've had a terrible snowstorm and no one could get into the office..." usually the schedule can bump a day or just a few hours. Helps to live near the hill. The flip side is that I have a long standing reputation for extreme reliability. Makes it easier to duck out for a couple hours.
post #24 of 25

I work a soul-less cubicle IT job for a fortune 500 corp.  I've had 5 managers in 5 years and all of them I figured out a way to ditch work with in some capacity without pissing them off or getting fired.  There are multiple approaches to this and each boss is different so you have to figure out what works.  I've found the biggest stumbling block to effectively ditching work is your co-workers noticing mainly due to having to pick up slack or just being nosey narcs.  So try to get a job where you work on a very small team or you work remotely and have flexible hours for the ideal situation.  Cubicle jobs, especially salary jobs, are the easiest to ditch because you usually get sick time and personal time and all this various time that they expect you to use.  From what I have seen, most bosses will be okay with you regularly using sick or vacation time for powder days as long as you are always on top or ahead of your work and you are honest and up front with them.  This is really the easiest approach and any respected boss should be treated with this method.  I tell my current boss months in advance that I will be using lots of random vacation days in Dec-Mar and he expects the e-mails now so I am very lucky in that regard.  If he was a dickhead, I would just burn sick time but again stay on top or ahead of my work. 

 

This year I got permission to "work from home" a couple days a week.  My local hill has wifi and I can park right next to the slope so I am going to try to take the work laptop up and have it setup in my truck so I appear to be online and working all day but in reality I will be skiing and checking in every hour or two on the work stuff.  Yes, I feel slightly guilty, but I've never regretted a ski day.

post #25 of 25
Quote:

stay on top or ahead of my work. 

That's THE key.

 

Most bosses will just look the other way even if they got wind of what you're up to. After all, that's what a job is all about, getting "work" done. If you can find a way to get it done while on the slope, most bosses just don't care.

 

That goes back in a full circle too. You can simply tell the truth.  

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