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Ski Goggles

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

New to the forum and have a few questions regarding ski goggles, hoping someone here can help me out.

 

I'm looking at purchasing the Oakley Crowbar's. Is there anything similar from other companies that could be recommended? Also, looking for the right type of lens. Looking for an all purpose lens as I'm not sure what the skiing condition will be and can only afford having 1 lens right now. Been thinking about the Blue Iridium, but the Dark Grey is considered an all purpose lens but allows less light?

 

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. Going to be skiing on-piste.

post #2 of 21

Oh... hate to be rude, but I'll self-promote: I have a pair of these for sale, almost brand-new. http://www.epicski.com/t/114747/fs-oakley-crowbar-goggles  PM me if interested at all.

 

On topic: I have found dark grey perfectly acceptable in brighter conditions, but a bit like wearing sunglasses if it's cloudy/foggy.

I haven't tried the blue iridium, but I like the fire iridium.  It seems bright when it's sunny b/c of the color, but there's actually a lot of protection there that you notice if you de-goggle.

post #3 of 21

There have been a few (fairly lengthy) threads on the merits of different lens densities/colors etc in the relatively recent past here.  Take a look through these and see if it helps in your decision.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/106729/goggles-and-what-are-my-options

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/109403/desperate-for-the-best-flat-light-goggles

 

Cheers!

 

Brian~

post #4 of 21

Welcome to EpicSki!  Try doing a Google search with something like "goggle oakley: epicski".  That should bring up relevant threads.  Unfortunately the EpicSki Search isn't too helpful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by O U 8 1 2 View Post

New to the forum and have a few questions regarding ski goggles, hoping someone here can help me out.

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies. Did some further searching and ended up ordering Oakley Crowbar with the blue iridium lense. Hopefully get them Monday, going skiing Thursday so will report back how well they performed.
post #6 of 21

The 15% transmission of this lens should be great for bright sun and bluebird conditions.  And the VR28 base is a good color for contrast.  I wouldn't guess that these will be top shelf performers in low/flat light scenarios of course, but if you have the option to purchase additional lenses (did you get more than the single lens by chance?) a lighter density will usually work much better for those off days.

 

Let us know how you like them after a bit of time on!

 

Best

 

Brian~

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 

Actually, according to the Oakley website the light transmission is 30% which is right in the middle so will see how it performs. There are 2 types of blue iridium lenses, if you go to Oakley website and click on the Crowbar snow goggles page and then lense tints it'll show 15% blue iridium....but if you click on Innovations and then lense tints and have the Performance tab selected its a different type of blue iridium. The one on the goggle is under "Sport Performance". Confusing, I know.

post #8 of 21
So how do you know which "blue iridium" you actually got? If you want/need a lens for flat light/fog, a vermillion lens works better than anything I've ever tried.
post #9 of 21

W/ Oakley........ High Intensity Yellow (81% light transmission) for me 95% of the time until around mid-March east coast. Here is the comparison of diff lenses for Oakley: http://www.oakley.com/innovation/optical-superiority/lens-tints

 

Great for in the woods and on sunny or shaded trails........ for out west I go darker............

 

Now trying a pair of Smiths.........nice goggles........ the Blue Sensor Mirror (70% light transmission)  : http://www.smithoptics.com/technology/#/Snow+Goggle+Technology/SnowGoggle+Lens+Options/view/

post #10 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by O U 8 1 2 View Post

Actually, according to the Oakley website the light transmission is 30% which is right in the middle so will see how it performs. There are 2 types of blue iridium lenses, if you go to Oakley website and click on the Crowbar snow goggles page and then lense tints it'll show 15% blue iridium....but if you click on Innovations and then lense tints and have the Performance tab selected its a different type of blue iridium. The one on the goggle is under "Sport Performance". Confusing, I know.


Agreed.  Confusing is being kind!  But that seems to be the way when your marketing department leads your R&D around on a leash.  ;)  It's only gotten worse since the buyout a few years back.  At any rate, whichever lens you end up with, do report back with how it performs for you on the mountain.  Here's to five feet of powdery fresh between now and then! 

 

B~

post #11 of 21

My 2 cents. When in doubt you should stick to a brighter lens, even on bright days skiing is always done alongside trees and therefor shadows. It depends how fast you are going but reading snow conditions is obviously important. Blue iridium is the darkest lens you should really consider but I think you made the right decision. I personally use Pink Iridium (rose 70% light transmission) for 80-90% of my days and Blue Iridium for the rest. 

 

Also, while I have those goggles and they are great, pray they don't break. Oakley's customer service has gotten to the point where I hate them enough to start selling off their goggles and switching brands. I am trying the Smith I/OX this year with 2 lenses. Mine are in the mail, and I will update a few forum posts once I get a few days with them. 

 

I have had a few run ins but the breaking point was Oakley will not sell you a replacement strap for your goggles, I am talking no amount of money (short of buying new complete goggles) or any available color. That has got to be one of the worst policies I have ever heard of. Their excuse is they only sell 'complete' products but they sell lenses separate?? 

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifree56 View Post

My 2 cents. When in doubt you should stick to a brighter lens, even on bright days skiing is always done alongside trees and therefor shadows. It depends how fast you are going but reading snow conditions is obviously important. Blue iridium is the darkest lens you should really consider but I think you made the right decision. I personally use Pink Iridium (rose 70% light transmission) for 80-90% of my days and Blue Iridium for the rest. 

 

Also, while I have those goggles and they are great, pray they don't break. Oakley's customer service has gotten to the point where I hate them enough to start selling off their goggles and switching brands. I am trying the Smith I/OX this year with 2 lenses. Mine are in the mail, and I will update a few forum posts once I get a few days with them. 

 

I have had a few run ins but the breaking point was Oakley will not sell you a replacement strap for your goggles, I am talking no amount of money (short of buying new complete goggles) or any available color. That has got to be one of the worst policies I have ever heard of. Their excuse is they only sell 'complete' products but they sell lenses separate?? 

By brighter lens did you mean a low light lens? If so, I agreed. I have the Smith I/O goggles and IMO the lower light lens comes in handy much more than the "sunny" condition lens. I found that I could only use to high light lens in bluebird conditions, otherwise my skiing greatly deteriorated because I can't read the snow!

post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
Never heard of that regarding the straps, but I'll def keep it in mind. I currently live in Prague, CZ so customer service here is a rarity. That's stupid they don't sell replacement parts, but it's money gouging they want people to shell out for another full set of course. Dumb. I've been very satisfied with their sunglasses that's why I chose the Crowbars.

Thanks a lot everyone for their feedback, really nice to see a friendly, active and helpful forum.
post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by skifree56 View Post

My 2 cents. When in doubt you should stick to a brighter lens, even on bright days skiing is always done alongside trees and therefor shadows. It depends how fast you are going but reading snow conditions is obviously important. Blue iridium is the darkest lens you should really consider but I think you made the right decision. I personally use Pink Iridium (rose 70% light transmission) for 80-90% of my days and Blue Iridium for the rest. 

 

Also, while I have those goggles and they are great, pray they don't break. Oakley's customer service has gotten to the point where I hate them enough to start selling off their goggles and switching brands. I am trying the Smith I/OX this year with 2 lenses. Mine are in the mail, and I will update a few forum posts once I get a few days with them. 

 

I have had a few run ins but the breaking point was Oakley will not sell you a replacement strap for your goggles, I am talking no amount of money (short of buying new complete goggles) or any available color. That has got to be one of the worst policies I have ever heard of. Their excuse is they only sell 'complete' products but they sell lenses separate?? 


Here you go if you need oakley parts

 

http://www.newschoolers.com/ns/forums/readthread/thread_id/722595/

post #15 of 21

Brilliant move by Smith including 2 lenses with the I/O and I/OX. Picked up some I/O on sale from Backcountry with blue sensor mirror (70%) and ignitor mirror (30%). Perfect setup for Whistler, I use the blue sensor 80% of the time as true sunny days are rare (and the sun is low in the sky until March anyway). I/O system is nice and easy to change lenses too.

post #16 of 21

It looks like Oakley does sell one kind of strap...

 

http://www.oakley.com/store/products/men/goggles/helmet-strap-kits

post #17 of 21

I have found that a) there is no such thing as a lens that gives good contrast in flat light, and I've tried a bunch. some are a little better than others. b) for the sake of your eyes if you are going to use one pair and one lens go with low light transmission, esp at altitude.  Yes things will look darker on stormy cloudy days but still plenty bright to see where you're going, and over time you'll be protecting your eyes from premature cataracts. For winter at moderate altitudes 30% should be a good all around lens. Wouldn't take them to the Himalaya.

And if you have more than one pair you will almost certainly pick the wrong pair 75% of the time.  

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I have found that a) there is no such thing as a lens that gives good contrast in flat light, and I've tried a bunch. some are a little better than others. b) for the sake of your eyes if you are going to use one pair and one lens go with low light transmission, esp at altitude.  Yes things will look darker on stormy cloudy days but still plenty bright to see where you're going, and over time you'll be protecting your eyes from premature cataracts. For winter at moderate altitudes 30% should be a good all around lens. Wouldn't take them to the Himalaya.
And if you have more than one pair you will almost certainly pick the wrong pair 75% of the time.  

Classic east / west divide here. As an earlier poster said, more or less, light here is bad even when it's good. And when it's bad it's pretty much like night time in New Mexico. So dark lenses tend not to be a good choice here.
post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I have found that a) there is no such thing as a lens that gives good contrast in flat light, and I've tried a bunch. some are a little better than others. b) for the sake of your eyes if you are going to use one pair and one lens go with low light transmission, esp at altitude.  Yes things will look darker on stormy cloudy days but still plenty bright to see where you're going, and over time you'll be protecting your eyes from premature cataracts. For winter at moderate altitudes 30% should be a good all around lens. Wouldn't take them to the Himalaya.

And if you have more than one pair you will almost certainly pick the wrong pair 75% of the time.  


There is a lot to what you mention above here.  It is true that there is no lens that can add things to vision that aren't already there.  But, there are lenses that can severely decrease quality of vision in certain lighting conditions.  On the ski slopes, in flat light conditions, a grey based lens tint, and/or a red/orange/yellow mirror are likely to reduce contrast, and increase the difficulty of reading the surface of the snow.

 

So far as I know, ALL mainstream goggle manufacturers utilize polycarbonate (Lexan) lens materials which naturally block 100% UVA and most of the UVB spectrum - regardless of lens tint or density.  There is some discussion that "high energy blue" light in the extreme shortwave end of the visible spectrum may also increase the risk of cataract formation and perhaps macular degeneration as well.  Warmer based lens tints, coupled with green/blue/purple type mirrors will tend to reject the highest amount of these frequencies, as well as the UV protection all afford.

 

Certainly skiing with more than one goggle lens available to use on any given day is the best and most flexible option for most of us - but certain goggle frame styles or manufacturers only have a single option.  I believe this is one of the biggest reasons that the Smith Optics I/O series has been so successful.  Couple that with intelligent lens tints and limiting their selection to a very manageable 13 color/density options (some companies offer over 40...ridiculous!) and it's easy to understand why this is a goggle of choice for so many today.

post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 

So to revive this thread, I went skiing today finally after buying these goggles over a month ago. Bad skiing conditions here recently, really warm, not much of a base and not worth it. Temperature turned cold the past few days and snowed a lot. Today was pretty foggy, and snowed a bit with the sun trying to break through the fog about midday and then disappearing but the lenses held up really nice. I had no trouble with vision, they didn't fog up at all and where very comfortable to wear. I could see better and get better contrast while wearing them. I suck at these reviews so, anyways yea I'm happy with the purchase smile.gif

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uilleann View Post


There is a lot to what you mention above here.  It is true that there is no lens that can add things to vision that aren't already there.  But, there are lenses that can severely decrease quality of vision in certain lighting conditions.  On the ski slopes, in flat light conditions, a grey based lens tint, and/or a red/orange/yellow mirror are likely to reduce contrast, and increase the difficulty of reading the surface of the snow.

 

So far as I know, ALL mainstream goggle manufacturers utilize polycarbonate (Lexan) lens materials which naturally block 100% UVA and most of the UVB spectrum - regardless of lens tint or density.  There is some discussion that "high energy blue" light in the extreme shortwave end of the visible spectrum may also increase the risk of cataract formation and perhaps macular degeneration as well.  Warmer based lens tints, coupled with green/blue/purple type mirrors will tend to reject the highest amount of these frequencies, as well as the UV protection all afford.

 

Certainly skiing with more than one goggle lens available to use on any given day is the best and most flexible option for most of us - but certain goggle frame styles or manufacturers only have a single option.  I believe this is one of the biggest reasons that the Smith Optics I/O series has been so successful.  Couple that with intelligent lens tints and limiting their selection to a very manageable 13 color/density options (some companies offer over 40...ridiculous!) and it's easy to understand why this is a goggle of choice for so many today.

Thanks for correcting me on the cataracts--how about snow blindness--UVA/B or visible spectrum or both?

And I confess to having bought a second pair of goggles with the blue sensor mirror lenses to go with my ignitors--there is a difference but nothing to write home about. This month the toughest visibility has been on bright days in the shadows--the low light angle reflecting off the surrounding open mountainsides from multiple angles eliminates what little contrast  there is in the shade and even the very big moguls we have at the moment are nearly invisible.  

And while we're on the subject of goggles, why do they still put the buckle in the middle of the strap, where it interferes with closing the helmet's strap retention clasp? Even Smith puts both the clasp and the buckle in the middle--and they make both goggles and helmets.

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