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Fork shock for old mtn bike? - Page 2

post #31 of 57
DB, I have 2 custom Curtlo steel HTs, they are top-notch. However, you can't build a Curtlo for $1000 because the frame alone is nearly $700. Minimum QUALITY build on a Curtlo or other "relatively" inexpensive high quality steel frame would be around $1750 or so.

Other lower-cost frames that have high quality reputation:

Vulture Cycles (I know Wade the builder, he's a great guy)
Curtlo
Hunter
Peyto
Tom Teesdale

and in a month or so,

Integrity (my own company, custom steel)

Here's a shot of the Integrity Wendigo prototype:



[ February 18, 2004, 04:13 PM: Message edited by: gonzostrike ]
post #32 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by ssh:
Well, I am seriously thinking about actually spending some time on my mountain bike this spring into summer. It's old (1989), but was decent at the time. It doesn't have even a front fork shock, tho, so I'm considering that such might be a good investment for the short term.

Any thoughts on this approach? Any recommendations?

What I really need to do is buy a new bike, I suppose, but that will have to wait a few years until the savings recovers from lengthy unemployment... :
Well, SSH, the truth is that you should just ride the 89 bike for the summer and enjoy the feeling of riding a bike. Get a new bike when you have the cash.

I am not sure the 89 vintage mountain bike is worth fixing up with new parts. First and foremost, as others mentioned, the standards are different. Yours is no doubt a 1" steerer tube, and the $$ you need to drop on a half decent fork you can put to better use to go toward a new bike next year. Your handle bars, your seat, wheels, brakes, and drive train are all extremely dated and very heavy. There is no way you can get your bike to the level of a more recent bike unless you drop some major cash.

I have a Bridgestone MB1, circa 1991 vintage, that I love to ride once in a while. Call it an antique, but I maintain it in original condition. Enjoy your bike for what it is. I also have a more recent vintage Merlin, which I do my serious riding and racing.
post #33 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by gonzostrike:
[QB]
WendigoQB]
Well, gonz, I couldn't get to that one as it's way over the access limit, but can you leave room for these
post #34 of 57
comprex, look again!
post #35 of 57
Pretty. Looks like an anti-Gunnar. Post pix of the seatstay bridge-to-clamp area to MTBR?
post #36 of 57
Yo! comprex!

Go here.
post #37 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by gonzostrike:
DB, I have 2 custom Curtlo steel HTs, they are top-notch. However, you can't build a Curtlo for $1000 because the frame alone is nearly $700. Minimum QUALITY build on a Curtlo or other "relatively" inexpensive high quality steel frame would be around $1750 or so.

Other lower-cost frames that have high quality reputation:

Vulture Cycles (I know Wade the builder, he's a great guy)
Curtlo
Hunter
Peyto
Tom Teesdale

and in a month or so,

Integrity (my own company, custom steel)
Hear what you are saying, but maybe the second hand value of such a bike is more within budget.
I don't know how much money ssh has for a bike, he only started out looking for forks and has said his savings have taken a beating. Maybe $1000 is far too much, a friend of mine was in the same position recently, he looked at ebay and in the local papers etc. It took time but he found a real winner by picking up a very good Hardtail for just over $300 USD.

PS Best of luck with Integrity
post #38 of 57
I have a nice set of JUDY Rox shocks that I took off when I went for the Noleen's.

A fair pricey could make me part with them. (don't tell my youngest son!)

IIRC they were considered "good".

Regards

CalG
post #39 of 57
ssh,

Last summer I have returned to mountain biking after a 7 year break. I bought a new bike and selected an entry level XC race bike. This one.

I have mechanical disk brakes however.

As gonzo mentioned, XC bikes have a more aggressive stance. You have to find out what kind of riding you will be doing to determine what you like and what bike fits your style of riding.

Toronto has many mountain bike centers and most of them are well maintained and have many levels of difficulty. You can do true cross country rides, but you can find yourself on very technical single trails where a XC setup can become a liability (especially in steeper terrain). So for me the bike is a compromise. I love my setup for climbs where the aggressive stance is a huge advantage (especially in out-of-the-saddle grunts). But I wish I had a more relaxed cockpit when the single track gets steep and hairy and I need to get waaay back behind the seat.

My suggestion is to use your bike and find out what you like. Then, if possible, find a mountain bike center where they demo bikes in the spring. Or try bikes from your friends.

Good luck.

[ February 22, 2004, 04:48 AM: Message edited by: TomB ]
post #40 of 57
Tom,

You can try a few things to make that Norco a bit more fun as the going gets steep!

The simplest is going to make a slight compromise in steep climbing traction, but makes the bike MUCH more fun overall. It's the first step I took away from pure XC geometry.

Get yourself a shorter stem and a riser bar with 1" or 1.5" rise, and equip your bike with a larger front tire, preferably a 2.3" width tire. The WTB WeirWolf 2.5 is actually a 2.3 size, and works darned well as a front tire. Another great combo for all around riding is the fairly cheap Tioga Factory DH, excellent traction, and you can run 2.1 rear, 2.3 front and have nice balanced traction.

Just some thoughts. I'm not sure what bar & stem are on the Norco. If the stem's already short, you might just need to try a riser bar. Also, don't be quick to cut the riser bar down to the width of the straight bar. You'll find the extra 2" or so of width helps in the steeper descents, while only slowing the steering very slightly. You'll need to do a wee bit more bar steering than before, but that's a very easy adaptation.
post #41 of 57
Thanks gonzo for the input. I have a 17" bike which is a tad small for my size (I am 5'6'').
Gonzo,

The original stem was short/flat and I actually installed a longer stem (with a rise) to help me in the climbs (with the original stem my arms were too bent). I also bought another XC bar which has no rise but has a 7 degree (rather than the original 5 degree) back sweep. It is a compromise I guess. I also run my shocks on the longest travel to help me in steeps. The idea of a larger/fatter front tire is very interesting. Thanks for the ideas!
post #42 of 57
the 17" is too small? whoa! you have very long legs or something? I ride an 18" hardtail and 17" FS, and I'm 5'10"... that's not to say you're wrong, it's only an observation. I think I like smaller frames.

Anyway, try the fatter front tire and a riser bar, and see how you like it. You'll have to do a bit of adjustment on your climbing with the riser bar. Since you'll sit more upright, you'll have to get your back flatter to keep the front wheel tracking, and actively pull rearward on the grips to make the rear tire bite. But I found that once I adopted that changed climbing technique, I was actually clearing more climbs than in my previous XC racerboy setup!
post #43 of 57
gonzo,

Remember that I am not an expert mountain biker. I have not ridden enough bikes to be able to tell the difference in terms of stance and feel. To me it feels a little small, but others have said the same thing you are saying - that the size is fine. I shall try various options and see how things develop.

Anyway, the good news is that I am now looking forward to biking in the summer just as much as I look forward to skiing in the winter.
post #44 of 57
Gonzo doesn't mention seat position at all, but I suspect him of a fair bit of set-back. That might actually translate into up-and-back for you, TomB.

(And I suspect he's a lot better than the lot of us together, but that's a different thread).

Just after riding 72 degree parallel with priest bars in the rain. (How Hemingway is that?)
PJ/comprex
post #45 of 57
Thread Starter 
Hmmm... New job may change some of my plans and give me some more freedom... I'm going to get out on the old bike, but then may be able to be in the market for a new one... [img]graemlins/thumbsup.gif[/img] We'll see!
post #46 of 57
okay, Steve, keep us posted!
post #47 of 57
Steve,

I can definitely tell you that riding a fully rigid bike in Moab is not a good idea. I know this first hand! I did it 4 years ago, and thought my arms were going to break on the downhill washboard type sections. I would have rented a full suspension bike, but they didn't have any in my size.
post #48 of 57
Gonzo, what do you think of Fox front shocks? It's time to upgrade the front on my trusty merlin xlm. Which one would you recommend for light duty/occassional xc races and generally routine trail rides?

To Suebrown, I trust my Easton Monkey Lite more than I would trust any aluminum bar.
post #49 of 57
This doesn't warrant a whole new thread, but ....

Woo hoo! A Fox Forx Vanilla RLC is being installed on my bike even as we speak! It'll replace the old crappy 2000 Judy w/Air. The bike is a 2000 Titus Loco Moto.

Joe, my research shows that the Forx are badass, and the number one choice for V Brakes. The one I test rode felt really plush & nice, with the caveats that I've never ridden a Marzocchi, and I only rode it on the street. Marzocchies only work with disc brakes, which I don't have.
post #50 of 57
joe, I'm with Sue.

Fox Forx are incredible. Fox took their time on the design and it shows. Excellent steering response because of the good lateral and torsional stiffness. Nice damping makes for good trail feel and a controllable suspension rate.

It's pretty easy deciding on the model -- the R has external rebound damping but internal compression damping adjustments; the RL adds a lockout; and the RLC puts the compression damping adjustment on the outside. Basically, you pay a lot more for the RLC just to have adjustability on the outside, and the lockout is irrelevant if you set your bike up properly and pedal smoothly.

I still prefer Marzocchi forks. But Fox and Manitou are catching up. RockShox is way behind, and their new Pike model is designed to help them catch up to the best coil/oil forks out there.

Sue, Marzocchi makes many forks with V-brake/cantilever mount post options. Someone gave you some very bad information. However, you will love the Fox... so it's a "no harm, no foul" situation.
post #51 of 57
Gonzo,

My impression was that the Z1 would be the Marzocchi that I want, but it doesn't accomodate V brakes, and also it's even heavier than the Vanilla. I just ride normal cross country, no hucking, no stunts, etc. I definitely like coils better than air.

Also, I wanted the R model, but nobody stocks it, and I hate to wait once I've developed a jones. So I got the RLC, which stands for "what the hell, it's only money."
post #52 of 57
Sue, the Marathon S (coil) was available with posts last year, but honestly I haven't checked this year's catalog. It's the same damping as the Z1, but with 30mm stanchions instead of 32mm stanchions. For a cross-country rider, it's all you'd need. I use a cheap Marzocchi MX Comp on my singlespeed and even though it has primitive damping, it feels okay on that oversimple bike.

Also the Z1 is a good 1 pound heavier than the Marathon S or the Fox Vanilla RLC. So you're better off with the Fox all-around!

Dang, I should sell bike parts in a shop. :
post #53 of 57
Got to ride my "new" bike this weekend. Oh, man, it feels so nice. So much better than my old Judy/Air fork. This bike, which I got in 2000, was my first with suspension, and I never really liked it. But now, with the new Fox Vanilla Forx, I see why people like suspension. I never "got" it until now. Coils are where it's at, baby.
post #54 of 57
Sue, you are doing a good sell job and I am on the verge of plunking down $$$$$$$$$$ for Fox RLC. The sad part is that I haven't even been on my mountain bike this year. The weather has been lousy and I am turning more and more a roadie each passing year. I had registered for a mountain bike race mid April, but backed down when it began slush raining that weekend.
post #55 of 57
Yeah, I was becoming more & more into road riding last year, but this will be a mountain bike year. Mountain biking is the closest sport to skiing that I know of. Not so much in terms of movement patterns, but in terms of feeling and attitude.

I test rode a few bikes with different forks (one Fox air and one Fox coil), and that's how I made my decision. I wouldn't have thought to do that, but the salesman suggested it. The two are a million miles apart in how they feel, and that made the choice easy. I hated the air and loved the coil. So I'd recommend that you try out some bikes with forks you're interested in just to see what they feel like.

I used to do local mtb races when I lived in North Carolina. One time it was raining/sleeting/snowing on race day, and all the women backed out. So I won!
post #56 of 57
Quote:
Originally posted by suebrown:
I used to do local mtb races when I lived in North Carolina. One time it was raining/sleeting/snowing on race day, and all the women backed out. So I won!
post #57 of 57
I wouldda won anyway, Comprex. I'm sure of it.
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