EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Member Gear Reviews › 2013 Dynastar Outland 87
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

2013 Dynastar Outland 87

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

1000

I finally got my 178cm Outland 87's out on the slopes at Sugarbush on Saturday and Sunday December 1st and 2nd.  This is  a first impressions report, with fuller review to come when we get some real snow in Vermont.   I am a 63 year old advanced skier and at 5'9" and 185 lb., II opted for the 178cm.  These green machines are 132-87-114 with a 18 turning radius.  They come with the system PX 12 Fluid bindings.  No metal, but advertised to have 3D wood fiber with basalt aramid particles (whatever that is) for tortional strength..  The tip is very wide and the skis felt a bit heavier in my hands  than my Bonafides, which I figure was mainly because of the weight of the PX12's compared to the Griffon bindings.  The tip and tail rocker is minimal compared to other skis that I demoed last March.

 

Conditions on Saturday were man made with several inches of freshies on top all groomed overnight with temps around freezing. - with things softening up in the afternoon. Early season trail choices were blue Jester to Downspout 2400' top to bottom with snowmaking whales from mid mountain to base to break things up, along with the steeper Organgrinder, that is usually a one trip only down due to ice and no grooming.

 

With really only two trails open top to bottom, I played around with various turn sizes, from short quick ones to longer GS type turns and the skis did it all with ease, with almost no effort on my behalf. OG had been winched the night before and I got on it early in the day when it was still soft and the Outlands edged great at higher speeds on the steeper terrain.  As the day went on things got cut up/bumped up and I hit the huge whales of snow left ungroomed by the snowmakers and had a blast.  These have a high fun quotient.  Sunday was very warm in the upper 40's and things really softened up, so I never really got them out on eastern ice. 

 

I could easily have opted for the Magnum 8.5TI's, but really felt like the 178cm length of the Dynastars suited me better than either the 174 or 181 of the Blizzards as the former felt a bit short and the latter a bit long.  It has taken me a while, but with so many great skis out there, it was really  worth the time to demo manufacturers' other than my true and tried to find a ski that is the perfect length for my requirements.  I was looking for skis that could effortlessly handle the bumps and tighter tree lines of Slidebrook along with the hardpack and typical 3-6 inch snow days of Sugarbush as daily drivers. And, the 87's definitely have that versatility.   I still need to get them out in  firmer and deeper snowy conditions.  And, of course, I have the Bonafides for the crud and deeper days.

 

Stan

post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gostan View Post

1000

I finally got my 178cm Outland 87's out on the slopes at Sugarbush on Saturday and Sunday December 1st and 2nd.  This is  a first impressions report, with fuller review to come when we get some real snow in Vermont.   I am a 63 year old advanced skier and at 5'9" and 185 lb., II opted for the 178cm.  These green machines are 132-87-114 with a 18 turning radius.  They come with the system PX 12 Fluid bindings.  No metal, but advertised to have 3D wood fiber with basalt aramid particles (whatever that is) for tortional strength..  The tip is very wide and the skis felt a bit heavier in my hands  than my Bonafides, which I figure was mainly because of the weight of the PX12's compared to the Griffon bindings.  The tip and tail rocker is minimal compared to other skis that I demoed last March.

 

Conditions on Saturday were man made with several inches of freshies on top all groomed overnight with temps around freezing. - with things softening up in the afternoon. Early season trail choices were blue Jester to Downspout 2400' top to bottom with snowmaking whales from mid mountain to base to break things up, along with the steeper Organgrinder, that is usually a one trip only down due to ice and no grooming.

 

With really only two trails open top to bottom, I played around with various turn sizes, from short quick ones to longer GS type turns and the skis did it all with ease, with almost no effort on my behalf. OG had been winched the night before and I got on it early in the day when it was still soft and the Outlands edged great at higher speeds on the steeper terrain.  As the day went on things got cut up/bumped up and I hit the huge whales of snow left ungroomed by the snowmakers and had a blast.  These have a high fun quotient.  Sunday was very warm in the upper 40's and things really softened up, so I never really got them out on eastern ice. 

 

I could easily have opted for the Magnum 8.5TI's, but really felt like the 178cm length of the Dynastars suited me better than either the 174 or 181 of the Blizzards as the former felt a bit short and the latter a bit long.  It has taken me a while, but with so many great skis out there, it was really  worth the time to demo manufacturers' other than my true and tried to find a ski that is the perfect length for my requirements.  I was looking for skis that could effortlessly handle the bumps and tighter tree lines of Slidebrook along with the hardpack and typical 3-6 inch snow days of Sugarbush as daily drivers. And, the 87's definitely have that versatility.   I still need to get them out in  firmer and deeper snowy conditions.  And, of course, I have the Bonafides for the crud and deeper days.

 

Stan


 

Good choice!  These are great skis, often overlooked, and they work better for me than the 8.5's you were considering (I can flex and work the ski much easier). The rocker is also much less, so it engages at the tip more powerfully on firm surfaces, and I love the soft tip in the bumps and junk snow.  It isn't a pre-formed rocker like too many skis: it flexes depending on how much you need it to flex. I think you will like them....I have a pair of Outland 80 Pros that I am digging, also 178cm.

post #3 of 15

looks like another great 80-something ski. I will keep an eye out for demo's on that one. 

post #4 of 15

I have the 80XT in 178 which I like so far. Only skied about 10 days on them.
 

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post


 

Good choice!  These are great skis, often overlooked, and they work better for me than the 8.5's you were considering (I can flex and work the ski much easier). The rocker is also much less, so it engages at the tip more powerfully on firm surfaces, and I love the soft tip in the bumps and junk snow.  It isn't a pre-formed rocker like too many skis: it flexes depending on how much you need it to flex. I think you will like them....I have a pair of Outland 80 Pros that I am digging, also 178cm.

Scott, you described the Outland's perfectly when you say "it flexes depending on how much you need it to flex".  Great description.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by steamboat1 View Post

I have the 80XT in 178 which I like so far. Only skied about 10 days on them.
 

One of my skiing buddies who is an instructor also loves his 80XT's.  Dynastar's Outland series is definitely doing something right here.

 

 

Stan

post #6 of 15

Great review.  I bought the same skis and hope for a versatile ski for both hard and soft snow.  Did not want a fully rockered ski as an ex racer/coach and like this technology for an everyday but versatile ski.  A little older than you I still charge hard and am a precise and dynamic skier and spend most of my time in the midwest, sometimes New England, and occasionally the west. Warm and little snow in the midwest so trying my new skis and boots (Lange XT130) will have to wait a few more days.

 

One of our sons and his family live in Franklin and ski Wachusetts as their local area.  Will ski NE in Feb but don't know where yet.

 

Get cold and snow......

 

Bill

post #7 of 15

Great review.  I bought the same skis and hope for a versatile ski for both hard and soft snow.  Did not want a fully rockered ski as an ex racer/coach and like this technology for an everyday but versatile ski.  A little older than you I still charge hard and am a precise and dynamic skier and spend most of my time in the midwest, sometimes New England, and occasionally the west. Warm and little snow in the midwest so trying my new skis and boots (Lange XT130) will have to wait a few more days.

 

One of our sons and his family live in Franklin and ski Wachusetts as their local area.  Will ski NE in Feb but don't know where yet.

 

Get cold and snow......

 

Bill

post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 

Sugarbush was blessed these past few days with a foot of snow + on either side of 3-4 hours of rain.  So I really got the chance over Saturday and Sunday to get the Outland 87's in all kinds of mixed conditions.  Saturday when the ropes finally dropped on the Summit trails @ Sugarbush North, I found about 12+ inches of snow on top of a hard crusty base.  In some places the crust gave and in others it just pushed back at you.  The big soft tip on the Outlands enhanced the float of an 87 underfoot ski.  And they had no issues when the snow got all cut up and I was going from soft snow to hard pack./crusty conditions.  When we skied down to the base for lunch, I hit some trails that had been skied the day before after the rains, and these conditions were quite different than those on the top half of the mountain with groomed conditions on the man made trails and icy bumps on the natural snow trails that had been skied out the day before. The Outlands were very easy to ski & versatile enough to handle it all whether it be soft, cut up, hard or ice. 

 

Sunday the ropes were dropped at South to a foot to about two feet of powder on some great trails like Mall, Twist & Steins.  I had brought the Outlands and my Bonafides with me and  alternating between the skis every few runs.  The Bones definitely had a bit more float and  charged through the mixed conditions after the trails got pounded by skier after skier.  But the Outland's could handle the conditions as well, but they just had a bit less float and a bit less flow in the broken up snow.   That was/is not an issue, and I would say that the 178 Outlands definitely skied considerably shorter than my 180 Bonafides. They should be perfect for the bumps that are shaping up now on the mountain for the duration.   I could have gone with either ski on either day, but unless there is a foot plus, the Outlands are just  more fun and flexible to ski for me for what is shaping up to be a great winter.

 

Stan
 

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gostan View Post

Sugarbush was blessed these past few days with a foot of snow + on either side of 3-4 hours of rain.  So I really got the chance over Saturday and Sunday to get the Outland 87's in all kinds of mixed conditions.  Saturday when the ropes finally dropped on the Summit trails @ Sugarbush North, I found about 12+ inches of snow on top of a hard crusty base.  In some places the crust gave and in others it just pushed back at you.  The big soft tip on the Outlands enhanced the float of an 87 underfoot ski.  And they had no issues when the snow got all cut up and I was going from soft snow to hard pack./crusty conditions.  When we skied down to the base for lunch, I hit some trails that had been skied the day before after the rains, and these conditions were quite different than those on the top half of the mountain with groomed conditions on the man made trails and icy bumps on the natural snow trails that had been skied out the day before. The Outlands were very easy to ski & versatile enough to handle it all whether it be soft, cut up, hard or ice. 

 

Sunday the ropes were dropped at South to a foot to about two feet of powder on some great trails like Mall, Twist & Steins.  I had brought the Outlands and my Bonafides with me and  alternating between the skis every few runs.  The Bones definitely had a bit more float and  charged through the mixed conditions after the trails got pounded by skier after skier.  But the Outland's could handle the conditions as well, but they just had a bit less float and a bit less flow in the broken up snow.   That was/is not an issue, and I would say that the 178 Outlands definitely skied considerably shorter than my 180 Bonafides. They should be perfect for the bumps that are shaping up now on the mountain for the duration.   I could have gone with either ski on either day, but unless there is a foot plus, the Outlands are just  more fun and flexible to ski for me for what is shaping up to be a great winter.

 

Stan
 

Cool, thanks for the update!  I am on the fence about my ski for this range; there is a good chance I will be on either the Outland 80 Pro or Outland 87 for my general off-piste, not much new snow ski. They are almost the same in terms of feel.  Just trying to decide if there is too much overlap of the 87 and my 98mm skis. The 80 Pro is great for those firm days when there aren't more than a couple inches of new snow; it is super responsive and deserves consideration for "best bump performance in an all-mountain ski". Bigger aggressive skiers might overpower either of the Outlands, but for lighter aggressive skiers like myself, they slot in there with the Rock n' Roll, Kabookie, BMX98, 999 and 888 as great all-mountain skis for skiers who are skilled but on the lighter side. 

post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

Cool, thanks for the update!  I am on the fence about my ski for this range; there is a good chance I will be on either the Outland 80 Pro or Outland 87 for my general off-piste, not much new snow ski. They are almost the same in terms of feel.  Just trying to decide if there is too much overlap of the 87 and my 98mm skis. The 80 Pro is great for those firm days when there aren't more than a couple inches of new snow; it is super responsive and deserves consideration for "best bump performance in an all-mountain ski". Bigger aggressive skiers might overpower either of the Outlands, but for lighter aggressive skiers like myself, they slot in there with the Rock n' Roll, Kabookie, BMX98, 999 and 888 as great all-mountain skis for skiers who are skilled but on the lighter side. 
I have not skied the Outland 80 Pro, but the 87's held a solid controllable edge on the always scoured boilerplate wind blown top of the Summit better than my Bones. I imagine that the 80 Pro would be just a bit quicker in the firm and the bumps. And although there may be some "overlap of the 87 & 98 skis" there may be no reason to opt for the 80 because you will be happier when that couple of inches on top proves the weather gurus wrong and changes quickly to much more.

Stan
post #11 of 15

Skied my Outland 87s (178cm) 5 days so far and mostly on hard snow except for one day.  My overall impression has been good.  Stable, easy to ski with decent edge hold on hard, midwestern snow (it's been a tough year here).  I had been skiing a narrower Volkl Tigershark 10ft which did have better edge hold but was not very good in softer snow...the Outland definitely was better.  Hope to give it a better test soon at Killington.

 

Won't be able to ski it out west which is what I really want to do.

 

If I were going to only ski in the midwest I would have bought the Outland 80 pro but hope to ski more west.

 

My new boots are the Lange XT130 and are terrific except for the colors...oh well.  Smooth and very responsive and love the idea that I can release the  upper cuff for walking.  No hiking in my skiing anymore but I have some significant disability and the safety and convenience of that and the extra tread on the sole makes it a great boot.  Anyway I can reduce the amount of energy I expend and increase my personal safety is important.  Wish there had been a boot like this decades ago when I was teaching.  Perfect for teachers and patrollers.   My only beef is getting them on and off.  The throat of the boot makes it more difficult than my old Nordicas and Tecnicas but some of that is due to the muscle disease I have and the loss of strength in my hands and arms.  But that same design also gives them the fit and performance I love.  Again, no buyers remorse.

 

No buyers remorse yet.

 

Bill

post #12 of 15

Just to add a review of the Outland 87.

I am 5'11'', 165 lbs (155 plus 10 extra of summer flab).  Solid advanced skier.  Ski primarily at Lake Louise - mostly off piste.

Did a demo at L/L - 170 length bindings set at the recommended mark.

conditions were mid winter packed conditions with lots of crud on some runs..  Did numerous runs, paradice bowl, outer limits, Brown Shirt, whitehorn for those that know the mountain.  Also some groomer runs and easy bump runs off larch.  I didn't do any tree runs.

I forgot I had the skis on my feet - they worked effortlessly in all conditions.  Knifed through the crud.  I skiied moguls faster and easier than I ever have.  My legs were not sore the following day.

I then bought a pair - bindings set at recommended mark, skied right out of the box..

I spend 6 days skiing in Switzerland at Portes de Soleil.  Conditions changed on a daily basis.  Day one much like above.  Day 2 woke up to 12 to 15 inches of fresh soft powder.  The skis floated through it effortlessly.  I don't have opportunity to ski powder often but it was virtually effortless.  Two days later after rain and freezing conditions, the runs were bullet proof ice and in some cases were closed as too dangerous and people were downloading off the mountain.  I skiied one of the closed runs - there was no way to carve due to the ice and steepness of the run but I felt safe and balanced onthe run.  Certainly not a carving ski, it was damn close and better than any other similiar width ski I have skied in similiar conditons.  I think I felt a lot more comfortable on that run than some of the other skiers on it that were on narrower skis.

The last day was fresh wet snow and rain.  The ski sliced through and floated over the piles of wet snow effortlessly depending on the type of turn/skiing you were doing.

For light skiers looking for a great all mountian ski to work the bumps and off piste crud and occasional forays on the groomers and for smaller amounts of powder, I would highly recommend you try this one.

Now that I am back home, will be interesting to try adjusting the bindings back a cm or two as recommended by several other posters.  I am not sure how these skis could get much better.

Other skis tested prior to buying were Vokl RTM 84, Rossi experience 88, Sno Day Heros, Atomic D2 VF 84s.  The sno day Heros were the closest to the Outlands in terms of performance but may suit a heavier skier better and perhaps needed a better tune.

Cheers

J

post #13 of 15

For reference, my background is 6'1", 190 lbs, and a super senior.  Ex teacher and coach and ski precisely and fast but no longer ski bumps (unless I have to), trees or gates.  Skied my Outland 87s in Feb at Killington and Pico in typical hard packed groomed conditions and they performed well.  I was still experimenting how to ski them on that trip.  The only negative was hitting the occasional ice patch and for those turns I wished I had a cheater racing ski. 

 

In March I skied in Northern Michigan at Boyne Highlands and Nubs Knob in the best snow conditions I have ever skied in the upper Midwest.  Day 1 was perfect groomed conditions after some light snow overnight.  Day 2 there was over a foot of fresh snow and it snowed hard all day.  Day 3 was groomed again but more like western packed powder and some runs got skied out.  Day 4 had another half foot+ of snow and the steeper runs got skied out by the locals.  My Outlands were a delight to ski in all of these conditions and made skiing almost effortless.  I was more than pleased with my selection of skis.

 

My new Lange XT130s were outstanding.  Skied like a dream and were comfortable all season.  Still not sure how warm they are because the coldest temps I skied in were about 0.  I have a circulation problem in my toes and extremeties so cold feet and hands are a problem for me at this stage of life.

 

Since I ski in the Midwest and east a lot I am going to get a pair of carving skis for those hard snow days and am vacillating between a cheater slalom race ski and a Tigershark like modified GS ski for next season.  It was hard to put my Outlands away after returning 2 weeks ago from Michigan but time to play some golf.

 

Bill

post #14 of 15

Title of the thread and the posters make this sound like a good place to ask for a length recommendation on the 2013 Outland 87.

 

I have demo'd the Outland 87 in the 184 length and really loved it in mixed conditions ( up to mid-calf midweight powder, chopped up mashed potatoes, and crusty moguls) here up at Crystal in WA.

 

I am really thinking of picking up a pair as a daily driver for primarily off-piste, but some groomer duty as necessary, (I also have a Legend Pro 105 in 184 and Legend 8000's in 178). Wondering if the 178 cm for the Outland 87 might be even better for me.  I am 6'2" (178-185 lbs body weight) and ski all over the mountain (except really icy steep double-blacks, who would want to? smile.gif). Might not get a chance to actually try the shorter 178 cm length. Based on all of your experiences, any insight on the most appropriate ski length for me?

 

Thanks,

Nick

post #15 of 15

Nick,

 

I found the 178 perfect for me with no limitations.  Most of my skiing is in the Midwest and east with some in the west however.  I did ski in over a foot of powder twice and mashed up snow several days and found that length just fine.  I am 6'1", 190lbs and although in my 70s ski precisely and fast.  As I posted earlier, the only downside to these skis is on true boiler plate but then they were not designed for that.  I will probably buy a second pair of skis, maybe non FIS slalom for those blue ice days.

 

If you skied deeper powder a longer ski might be an advantage for float but you will give up a little on shorter turns.  For me, I think I would ski the 178 anywhere.

 

Bill

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Member Gear Reviews
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Member Gear Reviews › 2013 Dynastar Outland 87