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What is an acceptable level of advice from shop employees? - Page 3

Poll Results: You come into a shop with "wrong" gear, you want the shop employee to......

 
  • 6% (4)
    Shut up and do the service you ask for
  • 66% (39)
    Do what you are asking for but kindly offer advice/information about your gear
  • 18% (11)
    Do what you want to do, with a disclaimer that you acknowledge that the gear is "wrong"
  • 1% (1)
    Refuse service unless/until you correct the wrong gear
  • 1% (1)
    Another answer - Please explain in the discussion
  • 5% (3)
    Poll is flawed
59 Total Votes  
post #61 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by at_nyc View Post

 

The answer can still be "everything". That would indicate the skier probably needs a ski that will be at home on a wide range of terrain.   

"Everything" always means the 'steep-ish intermediate trail that is labeled black diamond'. Saying "everything" IS an answer, it just isn't helpful, or it is if what you are after is an advanced intermediate 'all-mountain' ski.

post #62 of 66

To get back to the Original Poll Question.

 

 

The poll is flawed because it doesn't take into account the method of delivering the message.   Given the right sales/ softskills training you can get to get to the more ideal goals without the assumed customer dissatisfaction "cons" that are against that answer.

 

Some  people have these people skills naturally.  Those that don't have the natural skills can be taught and learn the communication as "techniques" even if they seem like tricks.  You don't need to bring in a speaker to teach a class on it; there are plenty of books out there where you can learn the techniques,  as well and lots of in depth study/research into this.

 

Most big corporations package these up as best practices for their drones to go through before they can work with customers; but of course each individual employee has varying degrees of success.  If you've ever happened to be up early enough and gone to an "average" Walmart to view their morning meeting and hear the Walmart songs, you can tell it's not quite as enthusiastic as what happens at corporate or Charter Walmart where everyone is gungho.

 

Some of the more "techy" call centers, actually implement voice recognition software which can observe the timbre of the customer's voice to guage a customer's satisfaction and advice how the Rep should reply. 

Again, in theory this information can be useful, but if used mindlessly by inept drones or the interaction is overly scripted it can make a customer even more angry.

post #63 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

 or it is if what you are after is an advanced intermediate 'all-mountain' ski.

 

An "advanced intermediate 'all-mountain' ski" will be infinitely more suitable to take into the trees thna a slalom ski. And better than a powder ski on icy groomers.

 

So yes, if your favorate trails are "everything" in a resort, it could very well be an "advanced intermediate 'all-mountain' ski". Or an "advanced 'all-mountain' ski", if there's any real difference between the two.

post #64 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

If you came to me for a boot fit, I'd say "Wow, you're gorgeous!"

 

Now, that is sweet of you, but it would probably piss me off. I did buy boots from big foot guy, I think. At least I knew he wasn't flattering me for a sale! (And my feet might be kind of long, but if they weren't, I'd tip over. Which is exactly what I told him.)

post #65 of 66

AND, for the record, I wish they were a little more meaty! lol. As it is, all the padding on the bottom is pretty much gone, and they hurt.

post #66 of 66

When I was in High School I worked in a bike shop. The owners advice was tell them what you think twice, then do what you want. I pretty much go by that. Refuse if it's totally dangerous. I had a guy once who wanted me to fix his chain or whatever on a bike with NO brakes. It wasn't a hipster with a fixie either. I told him no and he threatened to sue, he seemed to think he had some "right" to service, but only as much as he wanted, he refused to have me fix the brakes.

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