EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Worst first day of season ever
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Worst first day of season ever

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

It was partly my fault, then exaccerbated by outside forces.

So I'm a bit lax when it comes to tuning my skis, but I had no idea how bad they could be when I started skiing a simple blue run. My skis wouldn't slide. Now I'm not exaggerating, they didn't slide at all. I literally shuffled down the mountain. I didn't bother taking them into the 3 feet of powder, as that would have been suicide.

 

An hour later I made it to the bottom. A run that normally takes me about 7 minutes when cruising. People skied by me giving me strange looks. It was skinning uphill, but downhill.

 

So, I go to the local ski shop, one I'm very unfamiliar with. I ask the guy for a good all mountain ski, that is good for the heaps of powder we have. He gives me a 168cm race carver that is as stiff as they come. I said to  him 'that doesn't look like an all mountain ski to me' whereupon he vehemently defended his choice of ski and size and said I would thank him. I even said that I normally ski on about a 178 or longer (i'm just on six foot and 92kg) but he still said this was the ski for me.

 

On piste they skied fine. In the powder it was utter disaster. You would think I've never skied powder before. They were Nordica fire aroow 84 EDT. I read online later in the evening several reviews which said 'Don't take into deep powder.' Can't believe how stupid I am.

 

Anyway, after another disastrous run I return the ski an hour later. He charged me 85CHF (about 88 USD). I was well pissed by now.

 

It's obvious I won't be buying any skis from there, but it made me think, 'Has my skiing got that much worse?' and 'Can I only ski on fat skis now?' I ski on k2 public enemies about 5yrs old now, but I love them. 85mm under foot.

 

I do remember skiing powder on skinny skis, and really tearing it up. But my inability to ski deep powder on these Nordica's made me wonder if I've got lazy in  my tecnique, or if this ski is just that bad in powder.

post #2 of 19

As long as your first day wasn't your last day, it wasn't the worst day!


 

 

Is there any chance that you had snow building up on the bottom of your first set of skis?

 

I don't think you need to retire from powder skiing quite yet.  It was a single run on a new pair of skis that weren't ideal for the conditions.

post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 

It won't be my last, but I did take my old skis into my regular ski shop, and they had a good laugh. It turns out the conveyer belt at the bottom of the chair lift is heated, and the snow melts on the bottom of your skis, and freezes on the ride up. It's like superglue. Anyway, with my out of tune skis, this problem was grossly exaggerated. I managed to scrape the bulk snow off, but it wasn't good enough.

 

Anyway, I'm getting new skis, and have no idea what to buy. I'm an ex ski instructor and love skiing it all, but I won't be buying from the place had me on those Norica's in deep powder.

post #4 of 19

Yeah it sounded like a "snow freezing to the bottom of the skis" problem.

 

I once had that happen to me.  I think I had taken my skis out of the warm car and then dropped them on snow and stood on them by the lift while I was waiting for other people.  When I tried to get to the lift, I practically had to walk.   I figured I'd just get on the lift and deal with it at the top.   Of course, once I was on the lift I realized with some level of fear and I wouldn't slide down the ramp at the top and I'd have a hard time getting out of the way of the chair.  I managed to scrape enough away during the ride up to avert disaster.

post #5 of 19
Ever ride a chair above a really wet snow gun? Your skis slide really well at the bottom, but a buildup of ice crystals from the snow gun on the bottoms stops you dead when you stand up at the top. What a surprise!!!

My worst first run of the day, not the season, lasted a dozen turns. Then I got knocked down from behind and ended up with my tibia plateau in pieces.
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 

Omg, that is awful. Sorry to hear.

post #7 of 19

Instead of buying or renting different skis due to a wax problem I would try purchasing a can of spray on wax, scrape off all of the bad stuff I could, then spray on a coat of good stuff.

 

Here's my worst first day ever:

 

I had gotten my first brand new pair of skis at a post season clearance sale.  They were shiny hart gremlins that I realized were a little long for me, but I vowed to man up and rock them.

 

I waited all spring and summer and in to fall for the local hill to open.  It opened nice and early in late October for WROD runs.  I had mom drop me off there after school with my new skis ready to rock.  The first run, about half way down I was adjusting to the extra length and starting to feel comfortable and took my eye off the prize, tips crossed and I went head over heels.  One ski swung around on the safety strap and eek.gif nun chucked a nice gash in the back  of my headhissyfit.gif  As I'm sitting there looking at the blood on my glove I notice that the strap slipped off my foot and the brand new ski is now hauling ass down the rest of the hill on its ownhopmad.gif

 

I held some snow on the back of my head and limped down doing one way turns and side slips to the bottom in the general vicinity of where the ski headed.  After about 10 minutes of looking I am literally balling my eyes out because my new ski is nowhere to be found.  A liftie saw me bleeding, balling, and wandering around aimlessly then comes over to ask what's wrong.  I tell him the story.  He mobilized a posse of a patrol and a couple other employees and one of them eventually found my ski.

 

In the end, I did get a couple more runs in before mom showed up to bring me back home.

post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiingaround View Post

It was partly my fault, then exaccerbated by outside forces.

So I'm a bit lax when it comes to tuning my skis, but I had no idea how bad they could be when I started skiing a simple blue run. My skis wouldn't slide. Now I'm not exaggerating, they didn't slide at all. I literally shuffled down the mountain. I didn't bother taking them into the 3 feet of powder, as that would have been suicide.

 

An hour later I made it to the bottom. A run that normally takes me about 7 minutes when cruising. People skied by me giving me strange looks. It was skinning uphill, but downhill.

 

So, I go to the local ski shop, one I'm very unfamiliar with. I ask the guy for a good all mountain ski, that is good for the heaps of powder we have. He gives me a 168cm race carver that is as stiff as they come. I said to  him 'that doesn't look like an all mountain ski to me' whereupon he vehemently defended his choice of ski and size and said I would thank him. I even said that I normally ski on about a 178 or longer (i'm just on six foot and 92kg) but he still said this was the ski for me.

 

On piste they skied fine. In the powder it was utter disaster. You would think I've never skied powder before. They were Nordica fire aroow 84 EDT. I read online later in the evening several reviews which said 'Don't take into deep powder.' Can't believe how stupid I am.

 

Anyway, after another disastrous run I return the ski an hour later. He charged me 85CHF (about 88 USD). I was well pissed by now.

 

It's obvious I won't be buying any skis from there, but it made me think, 'Has my skiing got that much worse?' and 'Can I only ski on fat skis now?' I ski on k2 public enemies about 5yrs old now, but I love them. 85mm under foot.

 

I do remember skiing powder on skinny skis, and really tearing it up. But my inability to ski deep powder on these Nordica's made me wonder if I've got lazy in  my tecnique, or if this ski is just that bad in powder.

The Nordica Fire Arrow EDT is a great ski but not a ski that I'd recommend for going off Piste

 

Perhaps you have let your skills get sloppy a bit because the new technology is so easy to ski, but I'm betting that you just had a bad mojo day and would be fine on another day with a similar ski. 

 

Now, that being said, you may consider the Fire Arrow 84 EDT  as part of a 2 ski quiver or go to something like the Soul Rider to cover a wider range of the mountain.  

http://www.epicski.com/products/2013-nordica-soul-rider

post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

The Nordica Fire Arrow EDT is a great ski but not a ski that I'd recommend for going off Piste

 

Perhaps you have let your skills get sloppy a bit because the new technology is so easy to ski, but I'm betting that you just had a bad mojo day and would be fine on another day with a similar ski. 

 

Now, that being said, you may consider the Fire Arrow 84 EDT  as part of a 2 ski quiver or go to something like the Soul Rider to cover a wider range of the mountain.  

http://www.epicski.com/products/2013-nordica-soul-rider

 

I have got to be getting old.  What's the point of having an 84-waisted ski that's "not recommended for going off piste" with?  Heck, the widest skis I own are 88 underfoot, and they seem to handle off-piste conditions just fine.

post #10 of 19

The skis I use in all conditions are 100 underfoot.

 

What's more true?

A wide ski sucks on ice.

or

A skinny ski sucks on powder.

post #11 of 19

Depends on the skier.

 

also the specific ski. Making a generalization is pointless

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by steve2222 View Post

The skis I use in all conditions are 100 underfoot.

 

What's more true?

A wide ski sucks on ice.

or

A skinny ski sucks on powder.

post #12 of 19

Rental shop gave my brother way too short, way too skinny 160 something skis after he said he hadn't skied in a few years. Is this a common tactic or something when the rental stock gets low?

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by core2 View Post

Rental shop gave my brother way too short, way too skinny 160 something skis after he said he hadn't skied in a few years. Is this a common tactic or something when the rental stock gets low?

 

Well, do you think it is more likely that the guy RENTING equipment who hasn't skied in A FEW YEARS is really bad or really good?

 

Easy call for the rental guy- your brother could have always told him to go longer/fatter if he needed, while the clueless beginner wouldn't have any clue what to ask for.

post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve2222 View Post

The skis I use in all conditions are 100 underfoot.

 

What's more true?

A wide ski sucks on ice.

or

A skinny ski sucks on powder.


6 of one half dozen of the other?

 

Although I would say that for me, it does seem like a skis deep snow performance tends to increase faster than its hard snow ability decreases when it gets fatter, but I'm also not living where I'm skiing blue-ice "groomers."

post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 

Ok. so I got my regular skis back from my local ski shop. They did a really nice job, and it skied great. I went back into the powder and tore it up. My K2 public enemies, I just love. Was good for my confidence, and they're good enough for me on piste, even though they'll never be quite as snappy as others.

post #16 of 19

Must admit, if I'd argued the point with the shop and they still 'convinced' me to go out on the Firearrow, and I brought them back after one disastrous run, I'd want either (a chunk of) my money back or my choice of the rest of their skis in that category for the remainder of the day.  I imagine you chose something else and kicked on for the rest of the day, but you don't expand on that point.

 

Just about every on-mountain rental I've been to would let me come back and say "don't like those, can I try something else?"  That's the point of being on-mountain.  It's their one big advantage.

post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 

My problem is it's 1. Switzerland, 2. Villars. Switzerland doesn't do deals (even when you know the shop ownder). For example, I went to buy an x-box for my nephew, one shop had it 100chf cheaper. A competing shop, when told about this, just shrugged his shoulers. In NZ, Australia, Britan and USA, my experience has been they'd match you. In Switzerland they just don't seem motivated to sell. It's the same with the service industry here. I've never had a restaurant completely get all the orders right. Also, Villars is a posh village for the rich. So the shops have no interest in being nice and fair as there are heaps of people to pay inflated prices without hesitation.

post #18 of 19

Keep in mind it's not just the width that determines powder ability.  The Fire Arrow is very stiff and heavy as well, with no rocker to speak of either.  I'm guessing you like the PE's, which are only 1 mm wider, a lot better in a variety of conditions.  The PE's have no metal and are known for being very versatile.  TBH, I would take a lot of skis in the 70's width range before I took the 84 EDT's in powder.  

 

My first day was a wreck as well this year.  All you can do is sit back and laugh, it happens.  I know I'm getting a kick out of reading some of these stories.

post #19 of 19

Interesting!

 

I was reading your post describing the behaviour of your skis when skiing downhill and thinking that sounds EXACTLY like my old PEs ...

 

When I was in Val Thorens two years ago the K2 dealer claimed the P-Tex used on some PEs was dodgy. I ended up replacing with a pair of K2 Apaches

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Worst first day of season ever