New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Teenagers skiing

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

Hi - 

 

I am coming to Aspen with my two teenagers, ages 16 and 14.  We are staying in Aspen at the St. Regis.  The 16 year old is an expert skier but should not ski by himself.  The 14 year old is an intermediate skier and likes ski class.  I do not ski.  I need help trying to place them in ski school.

 

Do I take the 14 year old to Buttermilk or Snowmass for ski lessons - but leave the 16 year old at Ajax - for an adult ski class?  The problem is that the 16 year old routinely complains about "poor skiers" when he goes to adult ski classes - and that as an adult, they would not be in ski class if they were any good at skiing.  Any suggestions?

post #2 of 26

My kids started skiing by themselves about the age of 10, maybe sooner--I can't remember.  

post #3 of 26
Waste of money going to Colorado to ski, unless you like man-made snow on green runs. Ain't no snow in Colorado. Try BC.
post #4 of 26

It looks like Aspen offers teen group lessons up to 17...if he doesn`t like the adult classes, have him take those with the 14 yo.  It looks like they are offered all the time at Snowmass and peak time at HIghlands.

http://74.63.130.226/ski-and-snowboard-schools/lessons/teen-group-lessons

 

If you have the cash, you could also think about a private.  Tell them the terrain he likes to ski and I am sure that they would put him with an instructor who will give him a run for his money.

post #5 of 26

Aspen Snowmass has teen lessons for 13 to 17 year old's, so why not put both of them in that programme. Your 16 year old might have more fun with other teens rather than with adults. Depending on your 14 year old's skill level and confidence they could have lessons at either buttermilk or at highlands. If he specifically wants to ski at Aspen then he would need to do an adult lesson. The aspen snowmass ski school website is very good and will give you lots more information. Maybe a specific clinic could be an option.

 

Please don't be offended, but your 16 year old's comments about ski school suggest that he has some technique issues to sort out and his estimation of his abilities might be higher than they actually are so it sounds like if he really wants to be an expert skier some more lessons might help. And skiing is one of those sports where you never stop learning which is why there are so many advanced and expert clinics and lessons on offer.

post #6 of 26

Aspen has a group lesson program for teens 13 - 17. I am sure your son would be comfortable in this class. They cover park skiing and basic racing.

 

Karl
 

post #7 of 26

To be honest, I think you are being overprotective of your 16 year old. He is probably complaining about ski lessons because he doesn't want to be forced to take them. It is not often that advanced/expert adult skiers take general lessons (at least that is my experience), and it very well may be that he is getting stuck in groups that don't go on advanced terrain.

 

If it were my teen, I would buy him a helmat and let him ski on his own. There isn't really much danger skiing by yourself in a resort full of people that will find you if something happens. 

 

If you are afraid of letting him ski on his own, try putting him in a specific clinic (bumps or steeps or something) which typically have better skiers, or get him private lesson. 

post #8 of 26

I feel like first day he's gotta be in a lesson to learn the mountain and make sure he actually has the skills to be able to ski by himself when a storm dumps in Aspen and he's in the trees by himself and how to handle himself. If he's truly an expert skier, then he should be able to ski by himself. I'm 17 and I have skied by myself at several major resorts over the past few years - Verbier in the Swiss Alps; Tahoe resorts like Squaw, Heavenly, and Kirkwood; Jay Peak (which, believe me, if you were skiing where I was, had the most dangerous/lonely routes to ski by myself); and others. Allowing him to ski by himself will allow him to take responsibility for himself. I, personally, believe I have become a much better skier when I have skied by myself. It allowed me to better understand consequences, route-taking, and being more observant, which are all important attributes to learn as a skier that I learned from skiing by myself by not having others to help me out on where to go or what to do when things go bad.

post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omar View Post

Hi - 

 

I am coming to Aspen with my two teenagers, ages 16 and 14.  We are staying in Aspen at the St. Regis.  The 16 year old is an expert skier but should not ski by himself.  The 14 year old is an intermediate skier and likes ski class.  I do not ski.  I need help trying to place them in ski school.

 

Do I take the 14 year old to Buttermilk or Snowmass for ski lessons - but leave the 16 year old at Ajax - for an adult ski class?  The problem is that the 16 year old routinely complains about "poor skiers" when he goes to adult ski classes - and that as an adult, they would not be in ski class if they were any good at skiing.  Any suggestions?

 

I'm not sure why your 16 yo expert skier can't go by himself, but I'm sure you have your reasons.  I can't speak about the Aspen SS, but at JH if he got into a level 9 adult group he would be skiing the good stuff.  What level of group has he been placed into before?

post #10 of 26
For your 16 yr old, enroll him in a level 9 group lesson at Snowmass, Ajax or Highlands. I've had a private as there was no one else in the group. Terrain wise, there is something for the expert skier at each of the resorts above. Highlands is my favorite not just because of the bowl-- there is fantastic steep terrain all over the mountain.

The ski school at Aspen is fantastic. Make sure you let the supervisor know what you are looking for. One of the reasons to take a lesson even if you are a high expert is to find terrain you otherwise wouldn't find. Another is skiing some of the terrain there is crux skiing where a fall or blown turn an be threatening to your health; a companion is useful for safety. Finally, even if you are Bode or Lindsey, coaching can make you better.

For your 13 yr old, Snowmass sounds like the place to be. It has a huge variety of terrain and is a perfect teaching mountain for intermediate skiers.

You'll love the St Regis. It's my usual abode in Aspen (where I make an annual pilgrimage to ski with my ski coach).

Mike
post #11 of 26

If your 16 year old were an "expert", he would probably have a whole lot of days of skiing by himself under his belt by now.

 

I would be hesitant to recommend enrolling the kid in a level 9 lesson based on no other information than he is an "expert".

post #12 of 26

Ahhh Aspen.  The beer there flows like wine.

 

This sounds like a private lesson situation.  Put him with a "real" expert with local knowledge.  Be specific with what you want including GENDER.  Some young men just don't respond well to women.  Some do ;)

 

This way the lesson can be customized to his exact specs and will cut down on the "bored and frustrated" factor because, let's face it, old people suck at everything (except dispensing money).

post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post


I would be hesitant to recommend enrolling the kid in a level 9 lesson based on no other information than he is an "expert".
Terrain wise, there's nothing a level 9 class is going to ski that a level 7 or 8 class won't ski. Especially this time of year when there's no double blacks open. Besides, if the instructor sees that the kid can't hang, he'll stick him in a lower class. Although, given OP's lack of response, I'm assuming he cancelled his trip to Aspen and instead booked it for Whistler.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaos View Post


Terrain wise, there's nothing a level 9 class is going to ski that a level 7 or 8 class won't ski. Especially this time of year when there's no double blacks open. Besides, if the instructor sees that the kid can't hang, he'll stick him in a lower class. Although, given OP's lack of response, I'm assuming he cancelled his trip to Aspen and instead booked it for Whistler.

 

Or Jackson, we have plenty of double black open and current conditions are powder with free refills between runsdrool.gif.

post #15 of 26

Kid is old enough to drive to the ski area, but not ski by himself?

post #16 of 26

Not every 16 year old should be driving, no matter what the state says.  Same goes for 16 year olds skiing.  I'm assuming the parent knows whereof they speak.  Nor would I make any assumptions as someone did above ("There isn't really much danger skiing by yourself in a resort full of people that will find you if something happens. ") that because it's a ski area that people are safe on their own.  I confess to having skied Aspen so long ago that I can't remember the terrain other than a trail or two, but we have people die on a regular basis here due to tree wells.  A 16 year old boy is EXACTLY the kind of person to go off in the trees alone and never come out.  If you fall into a tree well, suffocation can be down to MINUTES.  Might not be an issue at Aspen (like I said, I can't remember), but it is in many areas.  

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Not every 16 year old should be driving, no matter what the state says.  Same goes for 16 year olds skiing.  I'm assuming the parent knows whereof they speak.  Nor would I make any assumptions as someone did above ("There isn't really much danger skiing by yourself in a resort full of people that will find you if something happens. ") that because it's a ski area that people are safe on their own.  I confess to having skied Aspen so long ago that I can't remember the terrain other than a trail or two, but we have people die on a regular basis here due to tree wells.  A 16 year old boy is EXACTLY the kind of person to go off in the trees alone and never come out.  If you fall into a tree well, suffocation can be down to MINUTES.  Might not be an issue at Aspen (like I said, I can't remember), but it is in many areas.  

Correction...almost NO 16 year olds should be driving.  Skiing is a different question...my 10 and 8 year olds ski by themselves so I don't see why a 16 Yo shouldn't but he may be crazy and ill behaved....of course I wouldn't take him to Aspen (if I didn't ski) if he was that way.

post #18 of 26

First and foremost, like many people have said I doubt that he really is an 'expert' skier, but is just seeking a challenge which granted ski school often doesn't provide for teens. I am 17 and I have been skiing on my own for the past 5 years. There is nothing like exploring the mountain by yourself. 

 

However, if you are not at all keen on him skiing on his own, then I would definitely recommend getting him a private lesson, even if it just for a day or two. Instructors will ask you where you want to go and will only take you there if they believe that you are good enough. A private lesson should enable him to do what he wants to do whilst being supervised. Best of both worlds. 

post #19 of 26

16 is 5 years before we think they're old enough to drink, yet we let them operate a 6,000 pound missile on the public streets.

 

A 16 year old that is an expert skier would in all likelihood have a lot of days of skiing alone under his belt. When my kid was 16 he had been racing for years, skiing on his own regularly, had his own avi gear and plenty of practice, yet he still knew the rule was that he stayed on piste when alone.

 

In this case, the parent describing the kid as an expert is himself admittedly a non skier. I would assume he is basing his description of his kid as an expert based either on the kid's self description or on a non skier's idea of what an expert is. I have to work from the assumption this kid has been a vacation skier, and doesn't have the experience or judgement that years of time on the hill grant.

post #20 of 26

I agree, IWill.  My daughter was certainly skiing by herself at 16, but she had close to 500 days by then (could be more or less, I only track my own days...and I had well over that for the time period), was a racer for five years by then, and had skied all over the US.  Even then, unfamiliar resort?  I'd have been keeping close tabs on her, which is tough to do for someone who is not on the slopes themselves.  And generally girls have more sense at 16 than boys do.  

 

To me, it's not the ability of the skier which should determine whether the kid can be by themselves, it's their maturity and judgement.  I don't even know how someone who is NOT skiing themselves can evaluate this.  It would have to be based on hearsay.  In this case, the parent is not able to evaluate either.  So, I'm somewhat inclined to go along with their assessment of the kid's judgement based on other experiences, but definitely not their assessment of his ability.  

post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chaos View Post

Although, given OP's lack of response, I'm assuming he cancelled his trip to Aspen and instead booked it for Whistler.

or it could be that he forgot where he posted the question in the first place...doesn`t look like he has been signed on since posting and Aspen has gotten 19" this week.

post #22 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I agree, IWill.  My daughter was certainly skiing by herself at 16, but she had close to 500 days by then (could be more or less, I only track my own days...and I had well over that for the time period), was a racer for five years by then, and had skied all over the US.  Even then, unfamiliar resort?  I'd have been keeping close tabs on her, which is tough to do for someone who is not on the slopes themselves.  And generally girls have more sense at 16 than boys do.

 

To me, it's not the ability of the skier which should determine whether the kid can be by themselves, it's their maturity and judgement.  I don't even know how someone who is NOT skiing themselves can evaluate this.  It would have to be based on hearsay.  In this case, the parent is not able to evaluate either.  So, I'm somewhat inclined to go along with their assessment of the kid's judgement based on other experiences, but definitely not their assessment of his ability.  

 

 

And generally girls have more sense than boys do.

 

FIFY

post #23 of 26

I'll give you that, Dawg.  Sometime around 40 the guys might catch up.  wink.gif

post #24 of 26

I skied by myself the first time my folks took me to a lift served ski hill.  I was 12.  Granted, I only had about 30 minutes to figure out how to use the chairlift before time to meet at the ski school bell.  The liftie sent me to the ski shop because my bindings didn't have safety straps so I only got one run in before ski school.  But, all day other than that and every other day until my older sister learned to ski some I was always on my own.  Buck Hill is VERY small though.  No tree well danger hahaha..

post #25 of 26

A 16 year old kid has no business skiing alone any place where tree wells would be a concern alone, but that goes for pretty much everybody else.

 

Aspen has some additional concerns as the mining district was right where the ski area is now, and there are old shafts and the like inbounds. Most are capped, some, mainly in the Trainors area, are not.

 

That said, part of being an "expert" skier would be to know that the rules are different for what terrain is a good idea to ski alone and what is not. At 10 years old, I was skiing stuff my dad was too old to touch, but if I was going to venture on anything that was trees or Double DIamond, I would be finding him on the slopes and letting him know where I was.

 

If it was my kid, and I couldn't trust him/her not to ski stuff that shouldn't be skied alone, I probably wouldn't let them put skis on in the first place.  I don't think using a lesson as a substitute for babysitting for a teenager is a good exercise either.

post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by anachronism View Post

A 16 year old kid has no business skiing alone any place where tree wells would be a concern alone, but that goes for pretty much everybody else.

 

Aspen has some additional concerns as the mining district was right where the ski area is now, and there are old shafts and the like inbounds. Most are capped, some, mainly in the Trainors area, are not.

 

That said, part of being an "expert" skier would be to know that the rules are different for what terrain is a good idea to ski alone and what is not. At 10 years old, I was skiing stuff my dad was too old to touch, but if I was going to venture on anything that was trees or Double DIamond, I would be finding him on the slopes and letting him know where I was.

 

If it was my kid, and I couldn't trust him/her not to ski stuff that shouldn't be skied alone, I probably wouldn't let them put skis on in the first place.  I don't think using a lesson as a substitute for babysitting for a teenager is a good exercise either.

Excellent advice.  Unfortunately the OP is a non skier so he may need to find someone to explain tree wells (and avalanches). And I would agree with the folks advocating a lesson if there is significant powder and the 16 y/o isn't experienced in it--just make sure it's a powder lesson. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion