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AT Ski that Doesn't Chatter?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I currently ski on Liberty Morphics--they're fine--light and lively--but chatter like crazy at speed or on very hardpack snow.

 

Just wondering if anyone could recommend a ski that's within a reasonable weight for AT skiing and might offer a smoother ride in these conditions?

post #2 of 23

That's a tough requirement.  It's the metal (sometimes) and weight in a ski that help it bust through crud and stay solid on hardpack.

 

You may want to check out some of the recent 4FRNT offerings, such as the Hoji and the Cody.

post #3 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

That's a tough requirement.  It's the metal (sometimes) and weight in a ski that help it bust through crud and stay solid on hardpack.

 

You may want to check out some of the recent 4FRNT offerings, such as the Hoji and the Cody.

 

Although I haven't skied it, when I was doing research on a new ski I found reviews claiming the Cody is pretty light and lively and I don't think it has any metal in it.

 

For the OP, it depends on weight requirements. Definitely look at the Hoji, awesome all around ski. Really depends how much hard snow stability you want (enough to get around in the backcountry, or enough to carve resort hardpack, Hoji can do both).

post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks for suggestion on 4FRNT--coolest promotional video I've ever seen (and possible to get "an in" .)

 

I read the description as Cody being more the ski for hard snow stability, but maybe I'm missing something.  For backcountry hardpack, I can always survival ski with my Morphics, so I guess I'm looking for something when skinning / doing laps at a resort that will enable me to have more fun on the way down in typically crap New England conditions (i.e., old manmade snow, icy, or ungroomed if I go early in AM).

 

Since demo'ing these boutiqu-ey skis is next to impossible, any extra info appreciated...

 

John

post #5 of 23

Welcome to EpicSki.  I have a pair of Icelantic Shamans and I can assure you they don't chatter or flap on hardpack at any speed.  I know several people around here who use them for AT.  If you happen to live in CO, Icelantic has several demo events in the state every and someone told me you can contact them in Denver and get your hands on a demo pair also.

post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Strider View Post

 

I read the description as Cody being more the ski for hard snow stability, but maybe I'm missing something.  

 

I started skiing a Cody this year and love it.  Today was a storm day with powder up to a foot deep everywhere, and the Cody sliced and diced it fine.  It was a blast today!

 

Of course, at 175 I'm not that heavy, so the 100mm width at 179 is plenty of float for me.  If you're bigger, or want something surfier, then the Hoji or some other wider ski might be better.

 

For light and playful, you can't go wrong with the Cody, though.

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post

 

Of course, at 175 I'm not that heavy, so the 100mm width at 179 is plenty of float for me. 

 

 

Thanks for the reply.  Well, I'm 145 lbs., so 100mm is fine.  Any experience in choppy, icy, or otherwise manquy conditions?  How about speed racer style skiing on groomers (any chattering at very high speed?)

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Strider View Post

Thanks for the reply.  Well, I'm 145 lbs., so 100mm is fine.  Any experience in choppy, icy, or otherwise manquy conditions?  How about speed racer style skiing on groomers (any chattering at very high speed?)

 

I've only had them in powder, soft groomers, and last week granular man-made snow and heavy, wet chop.  For as light as it is, it does O-K in heavy and wet chop, but there is some deflection, so you just have to stay on 'em.  I still had fun, though.  Everything else has been easy as pie.

 

I expect they'll handle icy, or super-firm snow the way any slightly rockered 100-underfoot ski would...just O-K.  I'm sure I'll find out soon enough, although I do have "hard snow" skis for those conditions.  I have Guardians on them, BTW.  I haven't toured yet but intend to start this season.

 

No chatter so far, but the snow has always been soft, so....

 

They're popular, though...both local shops that carry them only have one set left each, so they must be doing something right!  Try 'em if you can.

post #9 of 23

If any AT ski can meet your specs, the Kastle TX107 would be my bet. All Kastles are preternaturally smooth and stable, and the 107 comes in at what many all carbon rigs weigh, only no carbon. So will have more of a wood plantedness, less liveliness. OTOH if you like pop and liveliness, then the Wailer 99 would be worth a look. 

post #10 of 23
With softer lighter skis you will probably find that tipping them on edge less quickly as you start your turn, and being a touch more patient to tip them more progressively as pressure builds, often mitigates chatter.
post #11 of 23

Just curious, are these a one-rig lift served & touring, or are these for touring only? 

post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Just curious, are these a one-rig lift served & touring, or are these for touring only? 

Touring only

post #13 of 23
The PM Gear Bro model is an excellent chatter-free ski that tours very well.
http://pmgear.com/index.php/skis
post #14 of 23

I tour on Blizzard the one, not the ideal AT ski due to the twin, but it skis well in most conditions i find on my tours. I do mostly day tours and I pick my day looking for pow or corn. I also see alot of people on Mantra's and BD Killowats in this zone. 

 

I think choice of ski usually relates to what zone you are in and how your average tours works out. Mostly day tours, mostly hut trips, long vs. short approach, etc... I don't know many people who choose a midwinter touring ski based on hardpack performance. Some people will have a spring touring ski that is under 90mm with more focus on hardpack. 

 

Is your concern with hardpack mostly in cases of long hut trips where you really don't know what conditions will be like? Or is this a ski used mostly in the spring time? 

post #15 of 23

You are not going to fulfill all your wishes for several reasons. Naturally the lightweight builds preclude the use of (heavy) dampening layers and stout constructions. Second, assuming that you are using real AT boots and bindings, the boots are less rigid and the boot to ski coupling to the ski via the binding is not nearly as firm. This can generate somewhat the feeling of skiing in a boot that's a size too large. Less control available to you and hence some of the chatter will come from that.

 

Nevertheless, you can probably get a setup that is closer than what you have. Dynafit skis are made by Blizzard and that's a pretty strong recommendation right there. Also two 98mm skis that are (coincidentally) also made in the Blizzard factory are the Blizzard Kabookie and Nordica Hell & Back. Both ski very well in alpine setups but are lighter in weight than conventional alpine skis. They will not be as light as a pure AT ski but if you get chatter with those two.....the problem will not be the ski.

 

SJ

post #16 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:

Is your concern with hardpack mostly in cases of long hut trips where you really don't know what conditions will be like? Or is this a ski used mostly in the spring time? 

 

My deal is that I find skinning to be really good exercise and easy on my body.  Given low-snow conditions in the Northeast, I'm realizing the majority of my "AT" skiing is skinning up manmade, machine-groomed snow at resorts (and bombing down same).   So, if I'm honest with myself, I guess I'm really looking for skis that are ideal for those specific conditions (and I'll just use my Liberty's in the backcountry).

 

With that amendment, I guess I'm looking for a recommendation for the lightest possible straight alpine ski that's good in hardpack/ice and stable at high speeds.  (And put out by a company that's friendly to others in the industry.)  

 

So, anything from Salomon or Dynastar someone could recommend?

post #17 of 23

It is good exercise! Sorry i don't have much to offer. Maybe find some old carvers on ebay or ski swap. Good luck. 

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Strider View Post

 

My deal is that I find skinning to be really good exercise and easy on my body.  Given low-snow conditions in the Northeast, I'm realizing the majority of my "AT" skiing is skinning up manmade, machine-groomed snow at resorts (and bombing down same).   So, if I'm honest with myself, I guess I'm really looking for skis that are ideal for those specific conditions (and I'll just use my Liberty's in the backcountry).

 

With that amendment, I guess I'm looking for a recommendation for the lightest possible straight alpine ski that's good in hardpack/ice and stable at high speeds.  (And put out by a company that's friendly to others in the industry.)  

 

So, anything from Salomon or Dynastar someone could recommend?

Actually, will alter my rec based on new data. Something like the Steadfast from Nordica might be your cuppa tea. Designed as a sidebounds ski; very light (I think about 3400 g total), stiffish for carving and crud, typical Nordica manners and grip, meaning lively but solid, pitbull on ice. If you have the $$, the Kastle FX84 might do the trick too. Also very light, typically smooth and refined, won't do quite as well as the Steadfast bombing hardpack but better in trees and bumps. Solomon doesn't make touring or AT skis, Dynastar's skis in this range are pretty heavy except for the High Mountain Cham 87, which apparently is a shape people either love or hate. 

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Given low-snow conditions in the Northeast, I'm realizing the majority of my "AT" skiing is skinning up manmade, machine-groomed snow at resorts (and bombing down same). So, if I'm honest with myself, I guess I'm really looking for skis that are ideal for those specific conditions

I would agree with SJ's mention of the Blizzard Kabookie or, for East Coast hardpack I think a bit narrower would be even better, in which case I'd suggest the Volkl Amaruq

4 years ago I had a pair of the predecessors to the Amaruq, the T-Rocks. They were light (no metal) but powerful for their weight etc, and very solid on hardpack. Typical Volkl edgehold, in other words.
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Strider View Post

 

My deal is that I find skinning to be really good exercise and easy on my body.  Given low-snow conditions in the Northeast, I'm realizing the majority of my "AT" skiing is skinning up manmade, machine-groomed snow at resorts (and bombing down same).   So, if I'm honest with myself, I guess I'm really looking for skis that are ideal for those specific conditions (and I'll just use my Liberty's in the backcountry).

 

With that amendment, I guess I'm looking for a recommendation for the lightest possible straight alpine ski that's good in hardpack/ice and stable at high speeds.  (And put out by a company that's friendly to others in the industry.)  

 

So, anything from Salomon or Dynastar someone could recommend?

 

Hi, John, can you tell me which resort allows uphill skinning on groom trails? I think BD Havoc or Stigma might be a decent fit for you.

post #21 of 23

Faction Alias or Agent 100?

post #22 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by divnamite View Post

 

Hi, John, can you tell me which resort allows uphill skinning on groom trails? I think BD Havoc or Stigma might be a decent fit for you.

Bretton Woods and Magic Mountain and Wildcat (with special ticket).  Others allow it outside of normal operating hours.

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Strider View Post

Bretton Woods and Magic Mountain and Wildcat (with special ticket).  Others allow it outside of normal operating hours.

Thanks! Good to know.

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