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video feedback please

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I know this is the worst video for analysis and it's shocking that I have never made the effort to get any good video...

 

General issues that i have in mind are all the usual favorites: hands and pole plant, too static, inside ski management (feels like it's running flat vs. on edge, too much weight on inside ski which i'm guessing is related to various other things), and everyone's favorite topic of CA and CB!

 

Anyway, would appreciate any comments/feedback and to keep it simple, a few drills to work on.

Cheers!

 

post #2 of 13

It's very difficult to say much based on that video. I see glimpses of a sequential edge change and an overall lack of dynamics when you hook up the skis. Perhaps a better way to proceed is to ask about the issues you mentioned because it is a window into what you feel as you ski and also will tell everyone how best to package feedback that will help you verses confuse you.

 

BTW, CA & CB? Care to share what you mean with these abbreviated terms?

post #3 of 13

Even with the stabilization is really hard to see... It doesn't look too bad but I think you'll get much better feedback if you can get a steady video from the bottom looking up at you skiing down! 

post #4 of 13

Actually, for MA purposes a stationary camera is the most common way to capture a skier's movements. Another common trick is to zoom out as the skier approaches the camera. Thus keeping the subject framed so we can see their movements and how the skis respond to those moves.

post #5 of 13

maybe I should have specified the bottom of the hill looking up at the skier.

post #6 of 13

Greetings Kiwi,

 

That video is liable to cause headaches! With that caveat, my analysis is more subject to error. To get better video, position the camera person downhill and ski down straight at the camera.  We don't need to see many turns. Seeing complete turns with a steady picture makes life much easier for analysis.

 

It's cool to see your edges engage the snow above the fall line  to get a rounder turn shape. With the edges engaged and good separation between your upper and lower body, you are showing appropriate angulation angles in about the 145-150 range for your speed (180 would be banked, 120 would be very high end skiing). My buddy Tony Knows your stance is good (Toes, knees nose in vertical alignment). The hand position is ok. The lack of wild hand movements indicates steady balance.

 

I do see evidence of too much weight on the inside ski (outside ski diverges). In your short radius turns you rush the finish with foot steering. Steering the skis is ok in short radius turns, but we prefer to see the skidding spread equally throughout the turn. In your longer turns, there is a quick edge change followed by some park and ride. We want to see all body movements be progressive throughout the turn (e.g. feet tilt for edging, ankle, knee and hip flex, upper body counter). This is easier said than done. Your turns start with an up move. As we move up the performance ladder, we want to see the initiation move come more from from the core and be more lateral than vertical. This is done adding flex of the new inside leg to your initiation movement. Again, this is easier said than done. Your turns finish with your upper body pretty square to the skis. I'd like to see you add "steer into counter" for your turn finishes so that your upper body faces more to the inside of the next new turn at the finish of your old turn. 

 

You are at the point where you ski well enough to ski most of the mountain without much trouble, but improvement beyond this level is likely to be difficult without help. There's a 50-50 chance that a couple of simple tips could open you up to the next level of performance, but plenty of skiers at your level need to get a lot more coaching and put in 20+ days/season in order to see big improvement. Your mileage may vary.

 

Suggested drills:

Bamboo over the shoulder - (don't do this if you have shoulder issues, be extra careful with bamboo on chair lifts) Ditch your poles. Place the bamboo across your shoulders using your hands to hold the boo just outside of shoulder width. Ski short radius turns with the boo pointing at the side of the trail vs down the slope. Widen the turns until you can no longer keep the boo pointing to the side of the trail  throughout the whole turn. From that point keep making wider turns, but minimize the amount that the boo start to point down the trail as much as possible. An alternate version of this is to hook your poles around your waist with each basket hooked into the strap of the other pole, then keep the poles pointed across the slope instead of the bamboo. This drill help to develop steering into counter. You want to get the maximum divergence between where your skis are pointing and where your shoulders are pointing just before you change edges.

 

Skate into the new turn - Start a new turn by lifting the new inside ski, turning the new inside ski down the hill, then stepping onto it with the new edge engaged. This drill helps to develop moving the core into the new turn as an initiating movement.

 

Flamingo turns (my name) - Start a new turn by picking up the tail of the new inside ski, then tipping just the tip of the new inside ski onto the new edge. Let the new turn happen. This is a harder version of the skate drill.

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys - I think you've captured what i'm feeling/thinking and I warned everyone that the video sucks :-) I will get proper video and repost in a few months! (i'm dealing with an injury at the moment)

 

I've really spent all of my time free skiing without much work on technique aside from a few group lessons when i was a kid (20+ years ago!) and while I'm comfortable skiing the whole mountain I want to work more on my technique now rather than just blasting around the hill (maybe it's hitting your 40s that makes you more introspective?).

 

The comments "sequential edge change and an overall lack of dynamics", "too much weight on the inside ski", "short radius turns you rush the finish with foot steering", "move comes more from from the core and be more lateral than vertical", "add "steer into counter" hit the areas that I feel are lacking or i'm confused on how to achieve. Thanks for articulating them and for the suggested drills.

 

Feel free to add any other drills/comments.

Cheers

K

post #8 of 13

Well, I can tell that your friend does not have stable hands biggrin.gif

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

 

BTW, CA & CB? Care to share what you mean with these abbreviated terms?

 

Counter acting and counter balance. They are PMTS terms. 

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

 

 

 Your turns start with an up move.

 

 

 

Perhaps Kiwi has been watching Youtube videos like this.

 

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

Skate into the new turn - Start a new turn by lifting the new inside ski, turning the new inside ski down the hill, then stepping onto it with the new edge engaged. This drill helps to develop moving the core into the new turn as an initiating movement.

 

Flamingo turns (my name) - Start a new turn by picking up the tail of the new inside ski, then tipping just the tip of the new inside ski onto the new edge. Let the new turn happen. This is a harder version of the skate drill.

 

 

 

Are there any PSIA "Go With a Pro" Youtube videos that Kiwi could refer to that show this lifting and tipping of the new inside ski? It would be great to see it in action, it sounds very interesting, I think you might be onto something worthwhile.

 

Would Kiwi need to narrow his stance to assist in lifting and tipping or can he maintain his current stance width and just flex the inside leg to help? Would it be best to practice this Flamingo Turn at a slow pace to get the movements right? In which case a narrow stance might be preferable.

post #12 of 13

Actually, several versions of the skate transition exist. Even diagonal strides across the flats require us to project the core. Perhaps the easiest drill to perform is to simply walk in a circle while wearing your skis. The core projection required to do that task is exactly the same move TR is talking about. Just done in a less challenging setting. I routinely play tag with my students to shift their focus away from things like stance width and keep it on moving the core to where you want to go. BTW, the PSIA video deals with moving the core over the feet, and that certainly is another way to get a student to move their core as they ski.

An important idea here is to only change one thing at a time. Doing that allows the student to feel the effects of that single change. Making two changes simultaneously makes identifying the effects of either a bit harder for the students to grasp.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

Actually, several versions of the skate transition exist. Even diagonal strides across the flats require us to project the core. Perhaps the easiest drill to perform is to simply walk in a circle while wearing your skis. The core projection required to do that task is exactly the same move TR is talking about. Just done in a less challenging setting. I routinely play tag with my students to shift their focus away from things like stance width and keep it on moving the core to where you want to go. BTW, the PSIA video deals with moving the core over the feet, and that certainly is another way to get a student to move their core as they ski.

An important idea here is to only change one thing at a time. Doing that allows the student to feel the effects of that single change. Making two changes simultaneously makes identifying the effects of either a bit harder for the students to grasp.

 

Sorry, I shouldn't have quoted the skate drill.

 

Refering to the second drill and the lifting the new inside ski (tail) and tipping. Which presumably TR means will lead the turn.

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