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Warm women's ski jacket suggestions?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I've love to ski, been at it my whole long 50 year life, but hate the cold! A couple of years ago, I impulse-purchased a new Kjus jacket at a steep end of season sale price. Was told that despite the lightweight feel, it would be very warm...well, it's not! Its stylish and great for spring skiing, but I'm headed out to UT for Xmas week and would love to gear up with something WARM! Thx for any/all suggestions.
post #2 of 25
Thread Starter 
PS: also need the jacket to have good pockets; need to be able to carry phone, wallet, keys, protein bar or two, sunglasses...
post #3 of 25

Trekchick (AKA: JacketSlut) to the white courtesy phone. 

post #4 of 25

Well, I have a few on my list for uber warmth.  At the top of the list is the Patagonia Rubicon.  Its down, lightweight, and has pit zips for that occasion when you want some extra venting. 

The Rubicon has three outside pockets and one deep inside pocket, which I consider good pocket placement. 

 

If you want something that looks a little less "puffy" the Descente Tina jacket is another one that I've had the good fortune to wear recently and I'm quickly falling in love with it.  Its waterproof (trust me, I have had opportunity to test the water resistance lately) and stylish, not to mention warm warm warm. 

 

It has plenty of well placed pockets and detachable fur on the hood.  I know some folks don't like fur, but it really does keep your face protected on a windy yucky day.  I do, however take the fur off on wet days. 

 

I have tagged both of these on the right side of the page for your convenience. 

 

Hope this helps. 

post #5 of 25

The Clymb is currently having a sale on Berghans of Norway gear that includes several women's down jackets with what looks like quite a few pockets.  If you don't already belong to The Clymb, you can use this link, http://www.theclymb.com/invite-from/GerryRhoades  Once there you have to scroll down a ways to get to the Berghans sale.  You might also want to look at the Patagona insulated Powder Bowl jacket and the Patagonia Primo Down jacket.

post #6 of 25

Welcome to EpicSki!  I'm over 50.  One of the best changes since I learned to ski long ago is the new materials for ski clothing.

 

My approach for staying warm is a shell with a down sweater or jacket.  Have a Patagonia Nano Puff that kept me warm at in the teens at Alta a couple years ago.  With appropriate base layers as well.  Got a Micro Puff that is even warmer.  I like the fact that these jackets are windproof enough to wear alone.  For flying trips, nice to have stuff that serves more than one purpose.

 

How do you keep your feet warm?

post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

 

How do you keep your feet warm?

Marz is on to something here, aarm feet, warm hands and a warm head help make a warm core. 

post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by marznc View Post

Welcome to EpicSki!  I'm over 50.  One of the best changes since I learned to ski long ago is the new materials for ski clothing.

 

My approach for staying warm is a shell with a down sweater or jacket.  Have a Patagonia Nano Puff that kept me warm at in the teens at Alta a couple years ago.  With appropriate base layers as well.  Got a Micro Puff that is even warmer.  I like the fact that these jackets are windproof enough to wear alone.  For flying trips, nice to have stuff that serves more than one purpose.

 

How do you keep your feet warm?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

Marz is on to something here, aarm feet, warm hands and a warm head help make a warm core. 

Even Dan Egan thinks so

Keep Your Feet Warm - EpicSki Community

post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 

I really appreciate the feedback! One jacket I found locally that seemed warm, met my pocket needs and was stylish too is a Cloudveil Down Patrol jacket...I'd never heard of Cloudveil but bought the jacket (only one in the store, plus easy return policy), came home and tried to check them out online; mixed reviews because their own sight had positive quotes but the company seems to have folded. So...any additional feedback here?

PS: toes always cold - no help for that except going inside sometimes :)!
 

post #10 of 25

Cloudveil was a top end brand and made some really awesome stuff.  The past few years they've had some internal struggles with the company and have not been as prominent.  I'm not sure if this has impacted quality of the product, but the Down Patrol was a good jacket a few years ago and should stand the test of time. 

 

The Down Patrol is (sort of) similar to the Patagonia Primo Down that Mt Cyclist mentioned. 

post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bebe View Post

I really appreciate the feedback! One jacket I found locally that seemed warm, met my pocket needs and was stylish too is a Cloudveil Down Patrol jacket...I'd never heard of Cloudveil but bought the jacket (only one in the store, plus easy return policy), came home and tried to check them out online; mixed reviews because their own sight had positive quotes but the company seems to have folded. So...any additional feedback here?

PS: toes always cold - no help for that except going inside sometimes :)!
 

I have an older Down Patrol, and it's great. If you have any idea what year yours was made, that would help ... but it's hard to say. Their quality did suffer after the company was sold, but some of my favorite pieces of gear are old Cloudveil things.

 

Btw, Cloudveil's original founders have started another clothing business based out of Jackson, called Stio. Some pretty cool looking stuff ... my mother was xmas shopping on their website the other day, so I have high hopes.... ;-)  http://www.stio.com/

post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bebe View Post

PS: toes always cold - no help for that except going inside sometimes :)!

 

There are a couple of options for that.  Ever since I got a mild case of frostbite as a kid I have had problems with cold toes.  Several years ago I bought Hotronics and they made a huge difference.  Two years ago I realized my liners were totally packed out, couldn't find a boot I wanted that fit, so I bought a pair of Intuition liners.  They were too snug to wear the footbeds with the Hotronic heating element so I left the footbeds out and my feet were warm the entire season.  When I bought new boots last season I bought boots that came with Intuition liners and my feet never gave me any problems.  If your boots are 4-5 years old or older, your liners could easily be packed out.  If the shell is the right size you can replace the liners for a lot less money than buying a new pair of boots.

post #13 of 25
Quote:
 
My approach for staying warm is a shell with a down sweater or jacket.

 

+1

It sounds like you might be expecting too much of a single jacket. Layers are the thing. For an average day I wear 2 to 3 base layers (and these are generally pretty warm themselves; usually Icebreaker or Ibex wool and/or Patagonia's heavier stuff), my Patagonia down sweater, and my Spyder jacket, which is a pretty heavy, lined jacket. The only time I would even dream about ONLY wearing my Spyder with my wool base layers is in the spring.

 

For toes, stick those little heat packs on them. I have Intuition liners and I hear people rave about how warm they are, but my toes are still cold unless I use heat packs. I use these in my gloves, too.

 

I also use a fleece balaclava, unless it's over 30 degrees. It makes a big difference.

post #14 of 25

I should have mentioned that if the OP or anyone else suffers from Reynaud's Syndrome, about the only thing that will help is something like those stick-on heat packs(put them on top of your toes not on the bottom) or something like Hotronic boot heaters.

post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I should have mentioned that if the OP or anyone else suffers from Reynaud's Syndrome, about the only thing that will help is something like those stick-on heat packs(put them on top of your toes not on the bottom) or something like Hotronic boot heaters.

I haven't had a pair of boots without hotronics for several years.  I swear by them. 

post #16 of 25

Patagonia Primo " Down" Jacket should do it for you. My wife swears by hers (and could probably rival Trekchick for shear numbers of jackets). Gore-Tex, plenty pockets, pit zips, insulated hood, etc. The Primo Jacket is nice, but not insulated.

post #17 of 25
If you "glow," down is fabulous. If you sweat like me--when the sun comes out, when I'm doing something strenuous, when I go indoors--stick to synthetic insulation, because down is unpleasant and loses its insulating properties when it's damp or wet. Synthetics are not your mother's polyester batting anymore; they sprinkle this stuff with fairy dust as far as I can tell.

Learn to love the layer. I bought an insulated jacket this year and have already learned that it's not enough on its own, even with heavy long underwear underneath it (wool if you can tolerate it, otherwise Capilene or the like). Thin layers go closest to the skin, becoming thicker on the outside. On a really cold day, I'll end up with a lightweight wicking short sleeved shirt to strip down to if I get too warm indoors, a thin base layer, a thick base layer, a fleece, and/or a micro or nano puff depending on how cold it is, and then the jacket. I usually ski in a shell with layers underneath; my hope is that the insulated jacket will provide enough additional warmth that I don't have to turn into the Michelin Man.

This being said, I like cold weather and skiing in storms, so I need all the help I can get. If you're more of a bluebird skier, you can no doubt drop some of the layers.
post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 

Wow - excellent tips here! I will have to try the footwarmers...or maybe get new boots (mine are almost antique but I worked so hard on getting them scooped out here and there to fit that I shudder at the new breaking in process).

I've learned that layering's the thing but old school (long underwear, wool sweater and a warm jacket) was just so much easier. Ah well, I will check out Patagonia and/or think abt hanging on to this Cloudveil; it's still on the website exactly as is so, since I bought it at an off-price place, I'm guessing it's last year's model.

Thank you!

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bebe View Post

I've learned that layering's the thing but old school (long underwear, wool sweater and a warm jacket) was just so much easier.
That is layering! cool.gif

One thing about the Rubicon is that it's advertised as water repellant, not waterproof. There's also a version with 150gm synthetic insulation instead of down, so the consequences of getting it wet aren't serious. I considered the Rubicon, but despite living in Utah I really wanted something waterproof, which is why I went with the Snowbelle. The Rubicon has a more fitted cut, probably because its insulation is a lot heavier than the Snowbelle's.

Have fun shopping! Become a member and sign up for an REI credit card, and you'll essentially get 15% off anything you buy at full price--10% dividend plus 5% for using their CC, and 5% dividend for discounted stuff, which doesn't earn a dividend. Yes, I'm the queen of the deal!
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bebe View Post

Wow - excellent tips here! I will have to try the footwarmers...or maybe get new boots (mine are almost antique but I worked so hard on getting them scooped out here and there to fit that I shudder at the new breaking in process).

I've learned that layering's the thing but old school (long underwear, wool sweater and a warm jacket) was just so much easier. 

 

Getting new boots is not a horrible experience, as long as you deal with a knowledgeable boot fitter.  Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum, read the wikis about fitting and terminology and then check the "Who's Who" to see if there is a fitter listed near you.  If there is, that is where you go.  But if there isn't, ask and someone will be able to recommend a fitter.  You'll be amazed at the outcome and your skiing is likely to improve, in fact that is nearly a certainty.

 

I hope the "long underwear" is not cotton.  Cotton does not belong on ski slopes.

post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 

Nope, not cotton. Under it all, nothing like Under Armour!
 

post #22 of 25

my list of warmest include: Helly Hanson Enigma jacket - synthetic with down pillows in the back, Arc'teryx Sarissa jacket (which I own) Goretex with plenty of Coreloft insulation, even warmer is the Arcteryx Fission jacket also Goretex with even more grams of insulation. These are great jackets but they come with a steep price point - the warmest almost always do. But they are all in one jackets so no need to buy expensive mid layers. Canadian price range is $600 for the Fission and up to $850 for the Sarissa and Enigma. 

post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 

I am going to check out the Arcteryx options - adding them to my list. I've decided to return the Cloudveil afterall - it does seem to cover all my needs but I bought a Medium and, trying it last night with layers, it's really too big, so I think I'll catch a lot of air. It was a great price at this off price place but, in the long run and over time, I think paying full retail and finding what I want will serve me best. That's what I did with the one I'm replacing (a Killy- now there's a blast from the past) and I've used it for at least a dozen (possilby longer) years. Thanks, Covie.
 

post #24 of 25
Thread Starter 

Still looking around...is anyone familiar with Halti (from Finland)?; one of my fave shops in Park City is carrying the line...looks very cool online, pricing is high but comparable to high end Arcteryx and Helly Hanson.

post #25 of 25

Halti makes what seem to be nice clothes. They do the uniforms for the Finnish WC team and supplied the jackets for the Birds of Prey FIS event officials a few years ago. I have never owned any of their gear so I can't provide user feedback but a friend likes his jacket a lot (maybe though it is the logos and patches).

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