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Waxing guide for all users

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

I have been reading a lot here on Epic about waxing and all that relates to it, since I have very little knowledge about it I would like to ask you guys to help me create a guide for all skiers.
 

I want to have something that will describe what a skier really needs based on ability and activity, in order to keep it as simple, cheap, and effective as possible.

 

I put in red what I'm looking for as far as answers
 

Thank you!

----------------------

 

Beginner skiers:

 

Base grind: needed or not? what patterns? (not needed)

Wax: how often? what type? how? (beginning and end of season, all temp)

 

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Intermediate skiers:

 


Base grind: needed or not? what patterns? (linear pattern, grind only after base damage)

Wax: how often? what type? how? (every month, rub on)

 

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Advanced skiers/Pros:

 

 

Base grind: needed or not? what patterns?

Wax: how often? what type? how?

 

-------------------

 

Local Racers:

 

 

Base grind: needed or not? what patterns?

Wax: how often? what type? how?

 

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National Racers:

 

 

Base grind: needed or not? what patterns?

Wax: how often? what type? how?

post #2 of 10

There are instructional how-tos on the site and the type of wax and structure pattern are largely a matter of taste and conditions at any given moment on any given run on any given day.  

http://www.epicski.com/newsearch/?resultSortingPreference=relevance&search=tuning&type=40

 

Racers tend to spend more money on fluoros and overlays.

post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 

Sibhusky thanks for the link, I'm aware of the various articles and threads about this... My goal is to create a quick reference guide for all skiers, in order to have an idea of what is the bare minimum.
 

I think it could be useful, especially for unexperienced skiers, to see what you should be spending their money on and what is not really necessary.
 

as you say local racers might want to invest in temp specific fluoros and overlays while an advance skier could do just fine with temp specific waxes only.
 

National racers will have skis set up for different snow conditions with specific base waxes, overlays, powders etc.
 

Do you see what I going for? :)

post #4 of 10

Firm answers where there are none.  

post #5 of 10

Nobody can answer the questions, because every answer start with "it depends...." You can't bring a simple set of rules to a complex issue with lots and lots of variables. Just on the grind front for example, the skis need a grind based not on how good a skier is on them but on how they have been used and for how long. A grind is like treads on a tire. Most would agree that in almost all conditions, tires perform better with tread. In most skiing, a ski performs better with structure on the base. You need a grind when the existing grind is wearing down. (there are other reasons too) The grind will wear based not on a calendar, but on all sorts of other things - how cold was it when it was used (colder snow is more abrasive), man made or natural snow (man made tends to be more abrasive), how much was it used in terms of runs (some  intermediates skiers put more mileage on a ski in a week than some experts do in a season), how was it waxed and brushed,  etc. and that does not get into choosing among the hundreds (maybe thousands) of grind patterns to pick some that are good for "all skiers'". I agree with Sibhusky there are no firm answers.

post #6 of 10

Bare minimum: paste wax.  Down-side: lasts no more than a day.

 

Next step up is probably the Wax WHIZard and a block of universal wax.

 

Bigger step up: universal wax, iron, scraper, nylon/brass brush.  Probably need a vise to preserve sanity.  Down-sides: lots more work, lots more mess.

post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 

umh... I guess we are looking at this from different prospectives. I understand that the variables and options are great, but IMO there has to be a base on which we all agree. I think that you are looking at this through the ski's eyes while I'm looking it through the skier's wallet. 
For example a beginner who only skis pizza slice on greens does not need a fancy stone grind, or fluoro waxes. I would suggest a basic flat grind when there are lots of deep cuts, and all temp wax at beginning and midseason. yes it might not technically correct but it should be good enough to maintain the ski and not affect the skiing.
 

IDK maybe i'm just totally off th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #8 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

Bare minimum: paste wax.  Down-side: lasts no more than a day.

 

Next step up is probably the Wax WHIZard and a block of universal wax.

 

Bigger step up: universal wax, iron, scraper, nylon/brass brush.  Probably need a vise to preserve sanity.  Down-sides: lots more work, lots more mess.

thanks Xela, this is more of what I was looking for, IMO an intermediate skier might want to start using universal wax and learn the basics of waxing and tuning...

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzamp View Post

umh... I guess we are looking at this from different prospectives. I understand that the variables and options are great, but IMO there has to be a base on which we all agree. I think that you are looking at this through the ski's eyes while I'm looking it through the skier's wallet. 
For example a beginner who only skis pizza slice on greens does not need a fancy stone grind, or fluoro waxes. I would suggest a basic flat grind when there are lots of deep cuts, and all temp wax at beginning and midseason. yes it might not technically correct but it should be good enough to maintain the ski and not affect the skiing.
 

IDK maybe i'm just totally off th_dunno-1[1].gif

A beginner is an interesting case. The beginner by definition is on easy, flat greens. If the skis are slow (as they could be if it is very cold (high friction abrasive snow) or warm with lots of moisture (high suction water) or dried out from no wax in a long time), the beginner is not going to slide down the hill at all and will be doing things to overcome the inertial of the ski that will probably be bad for development. Also, if the skier in on the east coast, skiing on man made (almost 100% of the bunny hills get tons of man made snow), the skis will get a lot more wear than they would out west and may need more expensive treatment to (e.g., a grind because of base burn that could have been avoided). So like I said, it depends....

post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Fair enough...
I guess this is the end of it.
Thanks for your input!
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