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Coming back with old gear

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

I've skied for a good few years. I used to a fair intermediate. I know skis have changed quite a bit.

 

My question is when I start again am I going to be better off with the entry level boots I am going to get from a hire shop, or will the 1990s mid-range Salomon boots I own still be better?

 

All advice gratefully received.

post #2 of 16

what is the condition of those boots? have you taken care of them? there's a good chance that the liner might be done...

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Used them for about 3 weeks. Inside they are like new. Scuffs, but no cuts on the shells. They've been packed away in the bottom of a warm wardrobe for the last 15 years.

post #4 of 16

The best boots are the ones that fit best, provided they are not about to crack into multiple pieces from plastic degeneration.  I would give the a good whack or two on a concrete floor and flex them a few times before taking them on the hill.

post #5 of 16

What Ghost said... there's a chance that the plastic could have degenerated but give them a try on dry land... if everything looks, feels, sounds, good I'd say go.  But if you are back into skiing seriously start looking for a replacement! :)

post #6 of 16

check the buckles especially, crank them down, check the boots in that state too, or walk around with them on in ski position for a bit.

post #7 of 16

They're probably fine. My wife has a pair of Raichle Flexons --the ones Full Tilt and Dalbello copied--at least that old that are still in excellent shape.  As long as the mice haven't been nesting in them.  As long as they're not rear entry they're probably better than entry level rentals.  Ski boot technology hasn't changed a whole lot--fancier ways to fit the liner but that's about it. Heck, they might be better even if they are rear entry, if they fit properly. Plastic can deteriorate with age, some more than others, but there's a reason they try to keep that stuff out of landfills.

post #8 of 16

A saw a lady in older boots show up after digging hers out of the basement.  1980s era, white boots, straight skis, about 65 underfoot.  She went to click into her ski for the first time and her boot literally exploded all over the snow.  I'm talking 20 boot pieces of various shapes and sizes, and five little piggies wiggling in the wind.  I had to hold back extreme laughter.

 

She waddles over to the rental shop where my wife was waiting and loudly announces, "I need new boots!" throwing her former pair on the counter minus the small pieces still in the lift line.

 

That's as epic a story as I have about reintroducing new gear to the slopes.

post #9 of 16

squirrel: Welcome to EpicSki!  Where do you plan to go skiing?

 

One of my ski buddies had to replace his 25 year old boots last season.  They finally cracked, both on the same day.  He'd been using them for 20-30 days a year.  Seems like your old boots are worth giving a try.

 

If you are going to get back into skiing regularly, well worth trying some new style boots at a ski shop to see how much things have changed.  I wasn't skiing for quite a while before getting my daughter on the slopes.  I replaced my 1980's rear-entry boots in 2005.  Early season sales are a good time to look around.  Best investment I could possibility have made for having more fun on the snow.

post #10 of 16

Actually boot have changed (skis and boot have changed) to take advantage of "modern" skis. They are more stiff laterally such that they give more control/support to aid in carving. I have some old Dachstein V3 boots that I had little success carving a modern ski with. Got a pair of Salomon X Wave 9 and I was an instant carver. I had learned the technique, but did not have the equipment.

post #11 of 16

I just retired my 1987 Langes at the end of last season.  If you plastic doesn't fall apart they should be fine.

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

I'm looking at Cervinia, Italy. Can't go until easter - so its its got to high, and it doesn't look too taxing.

 

The day's I could get the best out of Chanonix or Avoriaz are gone.

 

Thanks for the advice

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice everybody - general mood is its worth a go if I don't mind looking like I've come out of a time bubble. I'll try them out on a dry slope before lugging them across Europe.

post #14 of 16

My cousin had a pair of 90's Nordica boots that he liked. He skied in them for many many seasons. Finally one day at Vail he says to me his feet felt cold. Sure enough the toe box and tongue of one of the boots had developed a crack; opening up like the mouth of a gaper. I said he should send them to the Nordica museum.

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertRS View Post

Actually boot have changed (skis and boot have changed) to take advantage of "modern" skis. They are more stiff laterally such that they give more control/support to aid in carving. I have some old Dachstein V3 boots that I had little success carving a modern ski with. Got a pair of Salomon X Wave 9 and I was an instant carver. I had learned the technique, but did not have the equipment.

Depends on the boot.

My wife's old rear entry Nordica's fell apart in the parking lot about 10 years ago.

My old Koflach Comp 911s are still going strong (and I'll bet stiffer laterally than your X Waves).

post #16 of 16

Odds are better if they've been stored in a climate controlled environment.  I suspect that storing old boots in a hot shed or garage might just be something that breaks down the plastic.  Sounds like you kept yours inside so you might just be fine ;-)

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