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Post Ski recovery

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

What do you all do for post ski recovery, to get ready to ski hard the next day or day after that?  I know, beer, right?  :)

 

Is there specific nutrition advice that you follow that works, that aids in fast muscle recovery? 

post #2 of 20

Do you have some specific symptoms like sore muscles?

post #3 of 20

Something with electrolites like Gatorade during and immediately following activity.  I also recommend stretching out and some kind of anti-inflammatory like naproxin.  Hot tubs and jacuzzis always seem to help a lot, but watch out for potential dehydration.  Go easy on the alcohol.

post #4 of 20

The Stick!

post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

The Stick!

Yes, the stick works wonders! 

 

x2 about the anti-inflammatories as well. Staying hydrated is also a huge part of it, you really don't notice how much fluid you lose while skiing, but you will sure as hell notice the next day if you don't drink a lot of water, gatorade, etc.

post #6 of 20
Hydration is a biggie for me because I don't drink enough while skiing (who wants to stop??). I also lose a fair amount of sodium when I sweat (which I do despite earnest efforts at climate control). On a day off between ski days, light exercise (easy jog or bike, yoga) and stretching helps--even cold stretching, despite data saying otherwise.

Where do you find the stick? My IT band is the Band of Pain, and it would be easier to control the pressure with the stick than with the foam roller.
post #7 of 20

https://www.thestick.com/

 

I bought mine at a soccer store, but I've seen them lots of places, including general sporting goods stores. I have the sprinter stick, I think. It fits in my suitcase, so I travel with it. I'm not much for hot tubs, but after some long days I'll hop in for a while, heat up, and then roll my legs. It works great. It's especially good for IT band stuff, imo.

post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by wasatchwarrior View Post

What do you all do for post ski recovery, to get ready to ski hard the next day or day after that?  I know, beer, right?  :)

 

Is there specific nutrition advice that you follow that works, that aids in fast muscle recovery? 

Do a cool down after you ski, try to get rid of any lactic acid you might have accumulated during the day, hydrate. if you are really sore ice packs/icebath. good meal rich in nutrients (meat,carbs, fats) 

post #9 of 20

I am a masters bodybuilder, and I would recommend a postworkout carb/protein drink

just like you would take out after working out. You want a fast acting protein like whey

protein, and simple sugars.

 

Mix:

 

50 grams (2 scoops) of whey protein with water

You can mix 40-50 grams of sugar with it or drink

a sports drink like Gatorade. 

 

Drink 1-2 gallons of water a day.

 

Recovery will be much improved.

 

Buy the book, "Better than Steriods" on amazon.com.

 

It is a great book on nutrition by bodybuiding doctor.

 

Remember, Preworkout or Pre-Ski meal, Post workout/Post ski meal and plenty of water

 

Skiing is an intense workout. You body will start catabolizing itself (breaking it down) if

you dont recover properly.

post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by east or bust View Post

Yes, the stick works wonders! 

 

x2 about the anti-inflammatories as well. Staying hydrated is also a huge part of it, you really don't notice how much fluid you lose while skiing, but you will sure as hell notice the next day if you don't drink a lot of water, gatorade, etc.

 

The stick is great, also recommend a foam roller for self massage. I use the travel roller (travelroller.com) which is basically a PVC pipe with a yoga mat glued on, because once you use a foam one for a few weeks you will find it too soft to work on your legs. Doing self massage like this makes a massive difference in recovery for me.

 

I recommend against using NSAID's like ibuprofen on a regular basis, as inflamation is part of your body's recovery mechanism to repair the "damage" you create in your muscles through physical activity (not an expert on this, but the logic makes sense to me). Hydration is key too of course.

 

Number one thing really is maintaining a decent level of overall fitness. I used to be overweight and would struggle to ski 2-3 hard days in a row. I am now in the best shape of my life and can easily ski 5-6 hard days in a row at Whistler bell to bell. Big touring days are the only thing that kill me now.

post #11 of 20

My ski buddy swears by the compression shorts/tights which he bought last season.  He estimates perhaps 25% less muscle fatigue, especially over multi-day trip.  Of course this depends on the person.  

Bring a roller as mentioned above or a baseball/softball/golfball to massage out your muscles (or feet).

 

One other thing I've been doing is taking a humidifier with me and running it to max, as well as showering with the door open.  I have a humidity meter, and in the dry mountain air and typical dry hotel rooms, it takes a lot to move the humidity up to even "normal".  

While this isn't specifically related to muscles;  it'll help ensure a more pleasant climate which will can mean a better night's sleep and so you don't wake up the next morning hacking your lungs out and further dehydrated.

post #12 of 20

My physio told me to tape two lacrosse balls together and roll out on it. Great for upper/lower back, glutes, IT band, quads, calves and feet. Then I found this http://www.trs-products.com worked way better then the duct taped balls plus I can freeze it or throw it in the dishwasher after. Works wonders apres ski.

post #13 of 20

I use Sport Legs capsules an hour before (and sometimes immediately after) skiing, then wear compression at night.  Also I try to just generally stay in shape year-round so that a big ski day does not cause such a drastic muscle overload from my normal.

 

I try to avoid NSAIDS as much as possible due to the potential side effects, but in a pinch I'll take a few Advil.  I definitely don't make a habit of it.

 

If my muscles are totally in pain from DOMS then I may do a cold water soak, but I have to be pretty desperate to do that since it's not a very pleasant experience.  It sure feels like it helps though.

 

I just did four days in a row of pow skiing and am walking around fine, with minimal soreness.

post #14 of 20

I find that this works wonders (what, what, it was the only Spaten photo I could find):

post #15 of 20

Yeah, living in Munich I do a fair bit of the sort of recovery in that photo above... of course I'd rather drink with my buddies than an attractive woman in a dirndl-- IF she has the bad taste to drink Spaten (I know my buddies, and my GF have better sense than that). 

 

If you're getting DOMS after the first day or two out, it means you're out of shape/fitness. Forget the NSAIDS for muscle soreness unless you're competing as a career. Your body needs the natural cycle of inflammation... and chronic use of NSAIDS can do funky (not good) things to your inflammatory response and other systems. Save NSAIDS for injury/damaged body parts. 

 

Post ski recovery SHOULD almost entirely come down to pre ski fitness, healthy diet/fluid intake, if you're healthy and don't have chronic injuries/conditions. 

 

I snack on the lifts up, eat a solid breakfast, try to stay hydrated, and then drink a properly isotonic Fraziskaner Weissbier (or 3) afterward! 

post #16 of 20

spinning off from the new sponsor thread here is a solution...
 

http://www.underarmour.com/shop/us/en/mens-recharge-energy-suit/pid1207677

post #17 of 20

Compression tights. Look at cycling shops, there is a variety of recovery wear. Shorts, full length, calves, etc.  You can wear the shorts while you ski as well to help with fatigue.

 

Or

 

Redbull Vodka

post #18 of 20

This is timely considering the thread (and my own post a few back):

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/05/for-athletes-risks-from-ibuprofen-use/

 

Paraphrase: Taking Ibuprofen before/during workouts to pre-empt muscle soreness can result in "colonic seepage," heightened systemic inflammation-- and doesn't seem to reduce soreness or improve performance. Short-term use for injury seems to be the best mode of use. So use it to ease the recurrent back pain you have from that 20-year old sports injury that comes back after an especially hard day... but don't use it to try to skip out on the normal muscle soreness cycle of an intense workout (like skiing). 

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by justruss View Post

Yeah, living in Munich I do a fair bit of the sort of recovery in that photo above... of course I'd rather drink with my buddies than an attractive woman in a dirndl-- IF she has the bad taste to drink Spaten (I know my buddies, and my GF have better sense than that). 

 

If you're getting DOMS after the first day or two out, it means you're out of shape/fitness. Forget the NSAIDS for muscle soreness unless you're competing as a career. Your body needs the natural cycle of inflammation... and chronic use of NSAIDS can do funky (not good) things to your inflammatory response and other systems. Save NSAIDS for injury/damaged body parts. 

 

Post ski recovery SHOULD almost entirely come down to pre ski fitness, healthy diet/fluid intake, if you're healthy and don't have chronic injuries/conditions. 

 

I snack on the lifts up, eat a solid breakfast, try to stay hydrated, and then drink a properly isotonic Fraziskaner Weissbier (or 3) afterward! 

So Spaten lacks street cred?

post #20 of 20

Spaten is anecdotally the headache-inducing, least-tasty of the Munich Helles Lagers. You'll find plenty of folks that like it, but  the general consensus from the locals I roll with (we're talking a few generations of Münchners from teens through born in the teens... literally) is that it's pretty bad.

 

That said, two things should be said: i) "pretty bad" is in comparison to Augustiner Helles, which is as close to perfection as a Bavarian gold lager gets, and ii) Spaten, I think, was the first of the big Munich breweries so one cannot deny its street cred in that way (though it AND Franzi. are both owned by inBev now and that counts against cred in some measure). 

 

Let's be clear: Spaten mops the floor with most of the mass produced lagers on the planet. I'm just a snobby Zuagrostn. 

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