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post #31 of 40

Can't get a Japanese diesel.  If you could, I'd probably buy one.

post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

Thanks everyone.  I called the dealer in Bozeman and found out that the A3 is not being made anymore because Audi is redesigning it for the 2014 model year.  That probably isn't a big deal since we aren't desperate for a new car but we going to go have a test drive this Saturday - might as well since there's hardly any snow around here.  It would be nice if they made came out with a diesel Quattro version since the diesel A3 gets pretty nice mileage.  

It is available in Europe. 6sp manual 2.0l TDI (same engine in the Jetta/Golfs) with Quattro start from 28K EUR to 32K EUR Rated 50mpg hwy, 41mpg city.

 

I drive the Jetta Sportwagon TDI and it moves.  If you drive them hard they do get a little thirster though, but is fun with all that torque on tap.  Be forwarned it is an easy car to unintentional speed with.


Edited by oldschoolskier - 1/24/13 at 5:45am
post #33 of 40

I will just say this, if you are worrying about the cost of fuel, Audi is the wrong brand of car for you. 

post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

If questioning whether something is really necessary is considered being cheap, then I'm guilty and say "so what?"   I was only considering buying an Audi but then I started looking at their dismal reliability rating and that pretty much ended it.  Having owned numerous sports cars in the late 1960s, I've had my share of "worse than average"  cars and am not interested in going back to that.  So the next car will undoubtedly be a Japanese car, in fact my wife is pretty set on replacing her Subaru Forester with a Honda CR-V and the new CR-V is very nice.

Audi was recently ranked the 8th most reliable manufacturer and only non Japanese in the top 10.  Some people still think they haven't progressed at all in the last 15 years.  Whenever I hear someone talk about how "unreliable" Audi is, they almost always give an example about how someone they know has problems.  It's hardly ever first hand knowledge.  Since I've purchased my S4, I have only taken it to the shop for oil changes and routine maintenance.  Nothing has ever broken and I haven't had to throw money at any problems.

post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZachK View Post

Audi was recently ranked the 8th most reliable manufacturer and only non Japanese in the top 10.

 

What ranking was that?  I ask because the stat is completely meaningless without knowing which ranking it was and how the ranking was compiled.  For example, the JD Power Quality survey, one of the commonly touted surveys, represents anything but quality.  It's more of a customer satisfaction survey, i.e. how happy people are with their new car purchase.  It's compiled from data from new car purchases less than 90 days old, and basically anything people complain about on the car (which shouldn't be broken things at 90 days, but are more simply complaints) takes points off.  Famously several years ago, Hummer got killed on that survey primarily because people complained about the gas mileage they were getting.  Yet some people still refer to that ranking as a measure of how reliable a car is, despite it having nothing to do with reliability at all.

post #36 of 40

In the interest of full disclosure, I suppose I qualify as an Audi fanboy.  That said, I have to take issue with mtcyclist's dismal reliability rating given my real world experience with the 8 Audis I've owned.  I've owned lots of vehicles, and the only brand that has competed on reliability front for me with Audi is Honda.  My Subaru experience, and experiences with all the American brands I've owned, have not been on par with Audi or Honda.  Aside from real world experience, I'm not sure what ratings he's referring to, although having just bought another Audi and filling out the JDPower survey, I agree with the previous poster that that survey is no measure of long-term reliability.

To the OP's underlying question, I always put premium in all my Audis as I want to take neither the detonation nor the mileage compromise risk.

I'm also interested in the basis of the comment above about which brand of gasoline to use; there are sufficiently few refineries around that I suspect most of the brands at gas stations are sourced from the same refineries and, hence, there probably is no composition or formulation difference between, say, Conoco-branded gasoline and Chevron-branded gasoline.

post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOCEVG View Post

 I have to take issue with mtcyclist's dismal reliability rating given my real world experience with the 8 Audis I've owned.  I've owned lots of vehicles, and the only brand that has competed on reliability front for me with Audi is Honda.  

Unfortunately, one person's experience isn't enough to paint a complete picture. Not even a few people. To get a reliability picture, you really need a survey or some sort of automatic data collection system. You need a much bigger sample size. Except, that doesn't always translate to that ONE car you drove off the lot!

 

I personally owned some of the really cheezy brands like Chevy and Ford. I've been lucky that neither of them had much problem at all. In fact, in nearly 20 years of driving of those, I've not had any actual break down at all. And whatever minor problems that occurred occasionally was neither urgent nor expensive. So, if I were to draw on my personal experience, I'd say American brands are as good as any. Except I know enough about statistic to know for every problem I DON'T have, someone is having it, probably quite a few of them!

 

I also owned a Toyata and a BMW. With very interesting experience. The Toyota was solid as a brick. 10 years and 100k later, not a single repair was needed, however minor. OK, Toyota are supposed to be solid. Fine. But a co-worker has a Toyota that's got so much problem I knew his dealer location by heart from driving him to and forth to the dealer to get it fixed, over and over again!

 

My biking buddy owned an identical BMW as mine. Just one model year apart. Her's was extremely reliable. Mines? She drove me back and forth to the dealer enough to say "I wonder if you owned the same model as mine. Are you sure someone didn't just throw a new body over a pile of junk?" That 2 people can have such opposite experience on an almost identical car! Sometimes, luck just has something to do with it. 

post #38 of 40
Look up top tier fuel suppliers.

A mechanic friend advised me the same years ago. He showed me the valve job he was doing on an Audi that had spent its life in the hands of someone who always shopped for the cheapest fuel they could find. Top tier fuel suppliers have products that burn cleaner.

I've been driving Audis since the 1980s. I've put several hundred thousand miles on them. I've always used quality oils and the best fuel I could find, and I've never had an engine apart. I've had lots of other repairs, but not an engine breakdown.
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaobrien6 View Post

What ranking was that?  I ask because the stat is completely meaningless without knowing which ranking it was and how the ranking was compiled.  For example, the JD Power Quality survey, one of the commonly touted surveys, represents anything but quality.  It's more of a customer satisfaction survey, i.e. how happy people are with their new car purchase.  It's compiled from data from new car purchases less than 90 days old, and basically anything people complain about on the car (which shouldn't be broken things at 90 days, but are more simply complaints) takes points off.  Famously several years ago, Hummer got killed on that survey primarily because people complained about the gas mileage they were getting.  Yet some people still refer to that ranking as a measure of how reliable a car is, despite it having nothing to do with reliability at all.


I believe it was from consumer reports.
post #40 of 40

Two things.

 

One, you absolutely need to use premium fuel in an Audi.

 

Two, if you have one with the 3.2 V6 or the other FSI direct injection engines, you will also need to add a squirt of Lucas Upper Cylinder Lubricant or other similar treatment every fillup or two to keep the carbon deposits under control.  Oh, and give it the old Italian Tuneup every once in a while if you're not regularly getting it over 4K RPM.

 

The sales department never tells anybody that. You find it out from the service department after your first couple of scheduled maintenance visits and you can't'figure out why your mileage has gone down or the check engine light has gone on.

 

The carbon buildup issue is hardly unique to Audi/VW/Porsche. 

 

Beemers and pretty much every other car with a direct injection engine have the identical  issue. 

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