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Does the heat of an iron accelerate the aging of a ski?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

When I wax my skis, I can feel the warmth through the skis when I'm done spreading the wax.  I'm wondering if doing this again and again may accelerate the aging of the skis.

 

Heat in general accelerates the time effect on systems, because it artificially increases the kinetic energy of a system (usually liquids) and collides molecules the same number of times they would collide at ambient temperature over a much longer period of time.  Further, heat brings certain reaction to their activation energy, allowing them to proceed.

 

I'm not familiar with what (if any) chemical adhesives may be placed between layers of skis, but the integrity of that adhesion certainly can't be helped by 150 degrees celsius of energy bombardment three times a week.

 

I would further posit that the heat of an iron compromises camber (and rocker).

post #2 of 11

Skis are made of materials of greatly different thermal expansion coefficients glued together with epoxy.

When you heat them the shear forces between layers tear at the epoxy that is weakened by heat.

Too much heat and you degrade the bond between layers and the skis go dead or delaminate.

Hot boxing can be a real problem here too.

That's why the new infrared wax infusers sound good to me.

They don't heat the whole ski, just the base surface and the wax.

Leaving a good pair of skis in the sun in a hot car is really stupid.....

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Are there any hand-held infrared waxing devices for home use?

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlugBootBlues View Post

Are there any hand-held infrared waxing devices for home use?


 

 

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_SPM7436071502P?sid=IDx20110310x00001i&srccode=cii_184425893&cpncode=30-92864843-2

 

How about this, from sears?

 


 

 

Or this?  Looks to be very user-friendly.

 

http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=332836&catid=182990&aid=338666&aparam=goobase_filler

post #5 of 11

"I would further posit that the heat of an iron compromises camber (and rocker)."

 

I have skis that have been hot waxed with an iron at least 50 times.  No loss of camber or flex. 

post #6 of 11

I have observed that the more gouged and scratched the base is, the more time it takes to spread the hot wax with an iron, therefore putting more heat into the ski. Get that wax spread with the iron as quickly and efficiently and with as little heat as possible. I don't believe that I could detect any heat in the top sheet after I spread wax on the base.

post #7 of 11

I can sometimes feel heat on the topsheet when using real cold waxes (Swix 3 or 4 e.g.). I've switched to Dominator Bullet and Race Service ZF 4 (?). I think Dominator melts at a lower iron temp (but I am not sure of that, I don't have the Swix info any more) but the real reason was I found that the Swix had more of a problem with chipping off when scraping. (And scraping real cold waxes is a miserable job even if you lightly scrape while still a little warm.) I also prefer waxes that use lower iron temps for equal performance because of the belief that it has lower risk for the ski base longevity. 


Edited by vsirin - 12/2/12 at 5:36pm
post #8 of 11

I actually use the from-hell Swix CH 4 at the beginning of the season as the first layer.  I do warm scrapes of it when I first put it on so that the layer that is cooled is pretty thin, then getting it off is not as bad.  The first time I used the stuff, I didn't do that and thought that I'd trashed my skis because it was like removing some plastic icing from the skis.  Now that I warm scrape it, then cool, then warm it up against just a tad before the pre-brush scrape, it's not so bad.  Then the rest of the season I'm either slapping on Racewax hydrocarbon red or green depending on conditions.  I just found that the CH4 REALLY REALLY lasts and protects the ski.  I might put some on in the spring if we're getting a lot of corn because that's so abrasive.  But, yeah, the stuff is hell to work with.  

 

To get back on topic, I always iron until I feel the top sheet warming a bit.  I seriously don't know at what point this would shorten ski life.  My skis are normally getting wax roughly every 60k feet and two pairs have over 100 days on them (130-something and 150-something).  Since the "rule of thumb" for getting new skis is every 100 days, I'm clearly due, but the bases are fine.  The camber may or may not be (they feel fine to me, but who knows have much snap they've lost?), but the bases at least are in great shape aside from some "evidence of use".

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I have observed that the more gouged and scratched the base is, the more time it takes to spread the hot wax with an iron, therefore putting more heat into the ski. Get that wax spread with the iron as quickly and efficiently and with as little heat as possible. I don't believe that I could detect any heat in the top sheet after I spread wax on the base.

I think it's because the heat don't spread heavenly due to the difference of density between the repaired zone and the original base. Also, the material used to repair don't absorb the wax because it lack porosity...Here is something that is better:

http://www.toko.ch/en/products/tools/base-tuning/repair-powder-40g-graphite

post #10 of 11

BTW, I never use so much heat that  I can feel it thru the topsheet... I always use the minimum needed to liquify the wax and thats it

post #11 of 11

  Delamination can occur if the ski is subjected to too much heat for to long...I've waxed who knows how many pairs & never had nor heard of an issue regarding a ski I've tuned...but I've seen others have this problem. When in doubt, follow the wax's iron temp recommendations either on the back (or front) of the package, or on the website (swix, for example). Keep the iron moving, and go until your satisfied, maybe an 8-12" "tail" of liquid wax, trailing behind the iron.

 

 Hot boxing is something that you should have guidance with at first...130*-145* is the usual temp range for this (at least that's what I was taught, but in tuning, there are MANY different methodologies, of coursewink.gif), and again, never had a problem....but it can be a danger...

 

  As far as affecting camber, I can honestly say I haven't seen it, but if the skis are delamming.....

 

   zentune

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