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How often do you wax your skis? - Page 2

post #31 of 45

Not as often as I evidently should from this thread.

 

And daayum I'm lazy, when I do wax, I don't scrape, errant thinking point, "the wax will last longer" (I'm not a racer)

 

My weekday ski bud outweighs me by 35. He ALWAYS overtakes me on the flats ... and here I thought I knew why

 

Now I'm not so sure frown.gif.

 

There sure are a lot of knowledgable people on this forum.

What is the reasoning for waxing new skis before the first time out? or maybe I misread the post?

post #32 of 45

I ski mostly in New England and wax each time I go. I hot scrape to clean. I prep with crayoning on/ironing graphite hydrocarbon wax. I use three brushes. I use mostly all hydrocarbon wax. I use Swix cold powder when needed. I built my own hot box for under a $100. I made a hot bag, too, using a SOL $15 thermal bivvy bag, a blow dryer, a Radio Shack remote thermometer, rubber bands and short length of PVC. It works very well (CON: I have to be present to monitor it to maintain the temp at between 120-130 for 4 hours).

 

ZARDOZ works very well in face plant wet spring conditions. I use the Felix method to apply. It stays on. I apply to topsheets as well to keep the snow from sticking (paste wax work well too).

 

Hey,it all bring me closer to my skis and skiing. It gives me something to do for my friends and family.
 

VinSki Sweat Lodge.jpgIt's

My VinSki Hot Spa. It's not pretty, but it works.


Edited by Vinstant - 12/2/12 at 6:14am
post #33 of 45

off topic...when I live out west I think I went all season without even sharpening my edges.

post #34 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSLincks View Post

Not as often as I evidently should from this thread.

 

And daayum I'm lazy, when I do wax, I don't scrape, errant thinking point, "the wax will last longer" (I'm not a racer)

 

My weekday ski bud outweighs me by 35. He ALWAYS overtakes me on the flats ... and here I thought I knew why

 

Now I'm not so sure frown.gif.

 

There sure are a lot of knowledgable people on this forum.

What is the reasoning for waxing new skis before the first time out? or maybe I misread the post?

The reason for waxing skis before first time out, is whatever wax the ski manufacturer used (if any) is at best a very cheap and simple storage/transport wax, which will not last, nor perform as the fancy ski-wax you paid big bucks for. 

 

As far as the wax lasting longer, yah, having a load of wax will last longer, but it'll be slow and counterproductive. To have fast skis you need to clear the base structure and need to get the extra wax out, otherwise you'll get a suction effect.   I would suggest that if your goal is to minimize your work, then try varying your choice of wax instead of just leaving a large layer on.  Try a hard cold-temp wax, and that will acheive your goal of "lasting" longer then your all-temp wax.  

post #35 of 45

Thx Ray

post #36 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post

Opinions on Teflon based products like Notwax by Zardoz ?

 

I get my skis hot/iron waxed at the beginning of the season then apply Notwax each time before I ski. I used to use hand wax, but I can't tell the difference with the Notwax over real wax in performance. It's cheap, quick and easy.


I've used Zardoz over wax for a Nastar run or two in spring wet snow conditions. I think it helps in those conditions for a run or two, but I don't feel as though it stays on the bases very long. 

post #37 of 45

I wax mine every time because I like it that way!

post #38 of 45

  I always say to people that if you've never waxed/sharpened regularly (ie, take em in to a shop once a season and then go 30 days) the decrease in performance can happen imperceptably in a lot of cases. Nevertheless, happen it does! Now, I don't think the weekend warrior needs to tune after every time--unless special conditions exist (icy, rocky etc...) that is. But I think every other time out is a good idea. It allows for a more "consistent" experience, in regards to ski performance. Waxing isn't just about speed BTW, but there are other threads that cover thissmile.gif

 

  zenny

post #39 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

The reason for waxing skis before first time out, is whatever wax the ski manufacturer used (if any) is at best a very cheap and simple storage/transport wax, which will not last, nor perform as the fancy ski-wax you paid big bucks for. 

As far as the wax lasting longer, yah, having a load of wax will last longer, but it'll be slow and counterproductive. To have fast skis you need to clear the base structure and need to get the extra wax out, otherwise you'll get a suction effect.   I would suggest that if your goal is to minimize your work, then try varying your choice of wax instead of just leaving a large layer on.  Try a hard cold-temp wax, and that will acheive your goal of "lasting" longer then your all-temp wax.  

Depends on where you live. I don't bother scraping, the eastern man made hard pack does it for me. After a warmup run or two the base is shinier and more well scraped/brushed than I could've ever gotten.

If you ski on soft powder it obviously won't work and I would do the proper work if I had any of that stuff here, but with my local skiing condition it makes virtually no difference.
post #40 of 45
if you want to protect your investment (your skis;)), and at the same time enhance performance, wax, scrape and brush after every weekend...don't wait till they look/feel dry because then its already too late...the damage is done. for those that dont care?? no big deal then, i guess:))

respectfully,

zentune
post #41 of 45

I ski Crystal a lot and have found a solution for the frequently wet snow.  My fastest skis have a relatively coarse structure with faint diagonal cross-structure.  As I understand it, a coarse structure minimizes the suction from water surface tension under your skis, and a good structure seems to hold wax better.  A competent shop can put a good structure in your bases, I have this done once every few years when the structure starts to fade.  I used to run warm (0 to -4 C) and cold (-4 to -10 C) toko wax based on the weather, but that is hard to predict in the PNW.  I now run Hertel Super Hotsauce Wax all the time and rub on some Swix molyfluoro base conditioner before applying the XXX wax with a hot iron.  Base conditioner rubs on like a crayon and I get ~30 applications per 60g block.  I get 4-5 days out of this wax job and it is very fast in wet to relatively cold snow (down to maybe 15 F).  I now save the warm weather wax for spring and cold for trips to Utah.

post #42 of 45

   Oh...and wipe them down or dry them off after skiingwink.gif...these are your babies after allicon14.gif

 

   zenny

post #43 of 45

I second what Zenny says.  Rusty edges = slow skis and poor performance on groomed or ice.

post #44 of 45
On a related note, does anyone use some sort of coating like oil/silicone on edges, or do you just wipe it dry?
post #45 of 45
nope. just wipe them dry, then lean them against the wall side by side with the bases facing out so any left over water in/on the bindings will run harmlessley down the topsheet smile.gif

zenny
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