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The Golden Ski Guide

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
A friend of mine rescued this little book from a used book store that was disposing of it.  The Golden Ski Guide from 1966 by William N. Wallace and Bob Beattie.
 

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There are some real gems in here:
 
p. 15: "Solid ice, 'blue ice' as some skiers call it, should be avoided because the skis are so difficult to control.  Play cards instead."
 
p. 21: "Wedeln, a German word, means a series of quick, linked parallel turns that is the peak of ski proficiency."
 
p. 40: "Learn to fall gracefully and painlessly."
 
p. 67: "Lift lines are to be avoided if it means spending hours standing and waiting."
 
p. 76: " The parallel turn is a skid turn.  The tails of the unweighted skis skid through the fall line from one direction to the other.  Therefore the skis must be unweighted.  If they are not, the skid fails to take place."
 
p. 84: "But don't call them bumps.  They are moguls."
 
p. 85: "Skis that are thin in profile, such as metal ones, are helpful because they offer so little resistance beneath the powder."
 
p. 115: "Bindings, which secure boots to the skis, should absolutely be of the safety, or release type."
 
p. 118: "There are many nonskiing Americans wearing ski clothing and not knowing it.  This is so because sportswear in recent seasons has adapted the fabrics, notably stretch cloth, and the designs worked up for skiwear.  Why?  Because skiwear has proved to be highly functional for all kinds of outdoor activity and in addition has great style."
 
p. 128: "Female apres ski wear in lodge life may consist of sweaters and pants or long skirts, but always informal in appearance (if not in price)."
 
p. 130: "Children in almost every case take to skiing as though it were candy."
 
p. 131: "The snow tires have made obsolete the use of chains except under the most foul conditions.  So ski driving is no longer an outright hazard, as in the past."
 
There's a ski directory in the back.  It notes that prices are subject to change...
 
Vail $6.50
Squaw $6.75
Aspen $7
Stowe $7
Sun Valley $8
Jackson Hole $8
 
After reading through the book, I'm struck by how much hasn't really changed.  Sure, there are plenty of zingers in there, but I was expecting more in a book written 46 years ago.
 
Just thought I'd share.
post #2 of 14

p. 85: "Skis that are thin in profile, such as metal ones, are helpful because they offer so little resistance beneath the powder."

 

^that sure has changed lol.

post #3 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post
There's a ski directory in the back.  It notes that prices are subject to change...
 
Vail $6.50
Squaw $6.75
Aspen $7
Stowe $7
Sun Valley $8
Jackson Hole $8
 
THAT ^^ sure has changed a lot!
 
After reading through the book, I'm struck by how much hasn't really changed.  Sure, there are plenty of zingers in there, but I was expecting more in a book written 46 years ago.
 
Curious, what is the suggested technique for turn initiation?
 
Just thought I'd share.
 
Glad you did - great find.  icon14.gif
post #4 of 14

Just ordered a copy from Amazon, looks like a "must have".

post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 

sibhusky, I'd say "must have" is a bit of a stretch, but the entertainment value is good.

 

jc-ski, turn initiation is one of those areas that has changed quite a bit.  There's no tipping and bending skis here.  It's all about down-up-down.  It starts with an edge set.  Then, there's the up-unweighting to skid the tails around.  Finally, the weight comes down on the new downhill ski.  The descriptions of parallel turns and wedeln are exhausting just to read.

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

sibhusky, I'd say "must have" is a bit of a stretch, but the entertainment value is good.

 

jc-ski, turn initiation is one of those areas that has changed quite a bit.  There's no tipping and bending skis here.  It's all about down-up-down.  It starts with an edge set.  Then, there's the up-unweighting to skid the tails around.  Finally, the weight comes down on the new downhill ski.  The descriptions of parallel turns and wedeln are exhausting just to read.


I remember learning in Austria in the mid 60's with instructors and sometimes having the feeling that I was talking myself through the 4 steps of making a stem christy.

post #7 of 14

It's a must have for me...  I have a couple shelves of ski books, mostly historical stuff.  Since I learned to ski in Austria around Christmas of 1971 and had bear trap bindings and leather boots until 1975, this stuff is going to be "familiar territory".  

post #8 of 14

Thanks Xela, brings back the memories of my first leather lace up boots.

post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 

Boots?  Did someone say boots?  Page 114.

 

 

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post #10 of 14
Looks like a must-have for a ski house ( next to your copy of Squallywood) :-)
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 

Unfortunately, the book is just six inches tall.  Not very impressive on the coffee table.

post #12 of 14

Got my copy, in excellent condition.  So "new" feeling I hate to open it to do any scanning.  

post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

No worries.  Mine's in "well loved" condition.  And it didn't cost me anything.

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 

Here's another gem, the informational signs...

 

 

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I'm not really certain what schussbooming is exactly, but I think I get the idea.

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