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When traveling with young child, does your child stay in the room with you?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I posted last year about trying to travel with a young kid.

 

I have somewhat of a different question. How do you handle sleeping arrangements?  Does your child stay in the same room?

We go to bed quite a bit later than our child, not sure how i would handle that? Do i keep her up till we go to bed? Or do we crash earlier than usual?

 

I know this seems like a dumb trivial question, but i really dont know what people do? When we do go somewhere we usually rent a 2 bedroom or something with a loft, but what if thats not an option?

post #2 of 25

Obviously depends on the family, what the parents want to do after the kid is sleeping, how sound a sleeper the kid is, how easy the kid can fall asleep with others around, how cheap/wealthy you are, and what the available lodging options are.  We have only one kid and we've always had our daughter in our room travelling, but that's just us.  She's also a night owl, so hard to get her to sleep before us under the best of conditions.

post #3 of 25

Seems to me that whether child is sharing bedroom or has own bedroom, the parent can sit/read/chat with the child a few minutes until they fall asleep, then move to another area and retire later for their own sleep time.  If child is old enough to ski and has skied their buns off earlier in the day they should be ready to fall asleep quickly. ski.gif

 

Definitely don't want to keep the child up and risk them being super cranky next day.  If child is an early riser, then parents may want to be prepared to be earlier risers too.

post #4 of 25

Never a dumb question when you are first time parents, meaning parents dealing with situations with a kid of whatever age for the first time.

 

How old is she?  I was lucky.  I travel with my daughter a lot, not just for ski trips.  Before she was able to stay up relatively late, she could fall asleep and then stay asleep while the light and TV were still on.  When she was younger, sometimes I'd turn off the TV for 15 min and most of the lights to make it easier to say "It's bedtime."  But generally being in the same room was never an issue.

 

It's even possible to get two girls to go to sleep if you are clear that's staying up is not an option.  I've had one of her friends along (without a parent) as a ski buddy a few times.  Now my daughter is almost a teen.  So I'm more likely to go to sleep before her, especially if she has a friend over for a sleepover. rolleyes.gif

post #5 of 25

It's an unwise person who tries to mess with a child's sleep.

 

Our kids can be light sleepers.  We have, at times, sought refuge in the bathroom, where it's possible to get a lot of work done on a laptop.  If there are two parents, one can go to the lobby.  Also, having an excuse to go to bed early can be good for grown-ups.

 

Some kids can be moved once they're asleep.  Also, when I had a kid in a portable crib, we could throw blankets over to block light.  Just leave some air space.

post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 

Daugher is 2 1/2

 

thanks for the replies...this was a general question for any traveling situation, but somewhat relevant to skiing. I see people in Vegas and other places with little ones and was curious how they do it. 

 

 

Ive got a work event at DV this year, and I really want my wife to be able to go. Unfortunately, our messed up families cant be relied upon to keep her while we would be gone. I dont think she(wife) is going to be able to go, but i was hoping she could. She has never been out west, never skied, but i think she would really like Park City, and i know she would like the Montage..lol. I dont think it would be much fun for anyone with the kid in tow. Not yet at least. 

post #7 of 25

My kid (now 25) could sleep and still CAN sleep through an air raid siren.  She always stayed in our room.  She started accompanying me on ski trips when she was seven, but was on other non-ski trips with us from the time she was a baby.  Always stayed in our room.  There is no way I'd leave a young kid in another room in a strange place, even if you were the only occupants of a condo.  Maybe I was an over protective mom, but I remember being a kid and not liking to be alone in the dark.

post #8 of 25

Hmm . . . must say that it's a lot easier to do an airplane trip after potty training is done.  Since your wife has yet to start skiing, perhaps waiting a year or two would be better.

 

Any skiing within driving distance?  I started my daughter at age 4 at Massanutten during early season because it was close enough.  More than enough snow on the bunny slope for her to have a blast with the great ski instructors.  Bonus was that my non-skiing husband and I had time to play golf in the valley.  By the time I took her to Alta at age 7, she was perfectly comfortable exploring blues.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

Daugher is 2 1/2

 

thanks for the replies...this was a general question for any traveling situation, but somewhat relevant to skiing. I see people in Vegas and other places with little ones and was curious how they do it. 

 

 

Ive got a work event at DV this year, and I really want my wife to be able to go. Unfortunately, our messed up families cant be relied upon to keep her while we would be gone. I dont think she(wife) is going to be able to go, but i was hoping she could. She has never been out west, never skied, but i think she would really like Park City, and i know she would like the Montage..lol. I dont think it would be much fun for anyone with the kid in tow. Not yet at least. 

post #9 of 25

I have to agree with marznc about not taking them this time.  If you don't have someone to mind her while you travel, the entire travel thing for skiing is tough enough with equipment without taking a toddler.  We only went to the Caribbean at that age and, frankly, it was NO VACATION for me.  You'd think the beach would be wonderful, wouldn't you?  Well, 100% of the time you're watching them, not reading a book.  Getting to the island, changing planes, running for connections?  It's work.  Even if the destination has childcare (we did Club Meds after that first one, and even the ski trips when she was seven, eight, nine, were Club Med the first three times) it's extremely stressful.  NO WAY would I take a toddler along with skis and boots and winter clothes, they'd have to take me to the crazy ward just getting there.  The sleeping issue is the LEAST of your worries.

post #10 of 25

We've travelled with our son since he was tiny (he's 9 now) and I think it entirely depends on your child. We get one or two bed condo's, prefer two, but one can work. When he was two and a half he still fitted into the porta-cot (a travel crib?) and he would sleep in that either in his own room or in ours depending on unit configuration. After that he would either sleep in his own room, or when he was older (about 6 I think) we would put him to sleep in our room and move him to the fold-out couch/ murphy bed when we went to bed. But, we wouldn't do the separate bedroom thing if the 2 bed condo was really a one bed with an adjoining studio - nothing with self-closing fire doors in between the rooms.

 

But, our son is one of those kids who has always found it difficult to get to sleep, can't go to sleep in a room with the television etc, especially when he was the age of your daughter, it was party time, has an amazing ability to stay awake and we didn't like going to bed at 7:30pm. 

 

Take your cue from home. Is your daughter easy to get to bed and to sleep at night, or is it a bit of a mission. If it's the latter then go for more space (i.e. a door between where you and your wife can relax in the evening and wherever your daughter is going to sleep.

 

Is using the daycare at DV an option so your wife can have some skiing time? How much does your wife need a break too, sometimes a change of scenery can be really refreshing for everyone.

 

Hope it works out for you

post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Marznc,

Yes, beech, sugar, app...smile.gif speaking of which, my wife ,met a rep from Sugar who said they did privates for 2yr olds and up...I'm wondering if I should do that for my kid. I might give it a try.

Thanks all, I never was really considering taking my daughter to Utah. And no, I couldn't afford two rooms at the Montage if id wanted to, even at the heavily discounted meeting rate.

It was more of a general question to get feedback on people's travel styles with small children. A condo with two bedrooms works fine for us, we did it last week actually. I was curious how people handled it when that wasn't an option.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC68 View Post

Marznc,
Yes, beech, sugar, app...smile.gif speaking of which, my wife ,met a rep from Sugar who said they did privates for 2yr olds and up...I'm wondering if I should do that for my kid. I might give it a try.
Thanks all, I never was really considering taking my daughter to Utah. And no, I couldn't afford two rooms at the Montage if id wanted to, even at the heavily discounted meeting rate.
It was more of a general question to get feedback on people's travel styles with small children. A condo with two bedrooms works fine for us, we did it last week actually. I was curious how people handled it when that wasn't an option.

Good for you for thinking ahead!  I forgot you are in NC.

 

I'd wait until age 3 for a private.  Spend the time and money getting your wife in love with skiing this season.  Meaning invest in good boots from a NC boot fitter and lessons for her.  I replaced old rear-entry boots with 4-buckle boots from Ski Country during SugarFest a while back.  They had left over inventory so under $300.  Then stay slopeside at Sugar and you provide the babysitting.  Does App have slopeside lodging?  If so, my impression is that their ski school is better than Sugar.  Take your little one to the free sledding hill at Beech.  Learn about how to get used gear for a kid, investigate season leases, ask local skiing friends how they got their kids started.  What works in the Rockies or northeast may not apply in NC.  If you don't know already, learn how to ski backwards.  In short, get ready for the 2013-14 season when you have a pre-schooler.

 

I waited until my daughter was 4 because then she could start as a never-ever in the Massanutten ski school.  I wasn't really skiing much in any case since my husband is a non-skier (saw him try once after we got married . . . bad knee makes him too tentative).  Ski schools in the southeast wait until 4 because by then most kids have the strength and stamina to have a great time, assuming they inherently aren't scared of sliding on now.  In my daughter's group of 4 little girls, it turned out that it was the oldest (maybe age 6) who ended up quitting early.  Her skiing parents weren't too happy.  The other three were happily riding the chairlift with their instructor after lunch.  That was before Mnut put in the conveyor loading.  I had to learn how to help her load and unload the chair, but she was solid in a "pizza" from the first day on.

post #13 of 25
We always subscribed to the philosophy that kids can and will adjust and denying your wife a trip would be unwise. Our kids always sleep in our room. I'd assume your evening pastime does not necessarily have to include listening to loud rock music, so I'd say the kid should be able to sleep. Turn off that TV too and have a conversation. One of you could go to the lobby/bar/spa (hint:-). If you need couple time, hire a babysitter.
post #14 of 25

alexn: does your wife ski?  The OP's wife does not . . . yet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by alexzn View Post

We always subscribed to the philosophy that kids can and will adjust and denying your wife a trip would be unwise. Our kids always sleep in our room. I'd assume your evening pastime does not necessarily have to include listening to loud rock music, so I'd say the kid should be able to sleep. Turn off that TV too and have a conversation. One of you could go to the lobby/bar/spa (hint:-). If you need couple time, hire a babysitter.
post #15 of 25

I agree with Alex--kids are adaptable and it's good to "teach" them to travel at an early age. When our daughter was 5 mos. old, we took her tent camping for a week in Idaho. That was a long trip from the DC area. She did great. We have taken her on many ski trips and to many horse shows since then. I'm talking several per year. Start young so it becomes a norm for them. It IS a hassle, but guess what, they're going to be a hassle at times for the rest of your life ;) But the wonder and curiosity of a new place or a new adventure outweighs the hassle by 1000000X.

 

I have found as she has gotten older (she is almost 6) that the first night on ANY trip she tends to stay up later whether we are in the same room or not. After that, she is usually so tired from all the adventures that she does fall asleep even with the TV on. I can't imagine staying home from our many adventures just because I was worried about it disrupting her patterns. Yes, you might have a crankster for a day or two, but that's just life.

 

Take notes from this military spouse :) My husband was deployed over the summer, and daughter and I did 4 horse shows out of the area (one in Tulsa that was 10 days) and a 17-day trip to Idaho and WA. It was challenging but we had a great time! My uncle, who is quite the adventurer and took my cousin and I on many an outing in his VW Van, always said, "kids don't care where you take them, as long as YOU are with them."

 

I say go and have fun!!!

post #16 of 25

^^

I agree, I took my kids everywhere.  We shared rooms many times, but if it's an extended trip I would be more apt to get a bigger unit.

 

 

My 18 year old can sleep through anything.  Time for sleeping beauty to move out!

post #17 of 25

A private lesson for a 2 or 3 or 4 year old is going to last, oh, maybe 1 hour if you're lucky.  Ski resorts offer day care.  You can take the child out on snow and play, too, until she gets cranky.  But at 2 1/2 years old, she's going to need the same watchful eye all day long as usual.   If you want your wife to experience skiing, definitely use day care at the mountain and just enjoy being on your own on snow.  Best of all possible worlds if you have the $$, take a nanny/au pair with you.

post #18 of 25

Allow me to interpret what many have said in a different way...

 

One job of parents is to teach their children the norms of their world.  It's a disservice to non-infant children to mold the adult world around them.  The educational goal is for kids to fit into the world as presented to them, within reason.  Think: well-adjusted kids.

 

My wife and I decided long ago that international travel, skiing, camping and backpacking are part of "who we are" as a family.  My younger daughter was on a 6-hour flight at 7 weeks old.  My older daughter has stamps in her passport from 6 countries.  I didn't even have a passport until I could legally buy booze.  Unlike other parents I know, we take our kids to restaurants.

 

Be careful, though.  The goal is a long-term one.  The way to make, say, a life-long skier is different with some kids.  Not every kid should start at 3, as mine did.  There may be bumps in the road.  The equipment, the cold and exhaustion can bring out the worst in kids.  The goal is to associate the activity with enjoyment, not turn it into a punishment so one or both parents can ski.  There are a lot of judgement calls.  Many kids don't like skiing the first few times out.  Once they're over the hump, it may get much better.

post #19 of 25

Xela said it very well! icon14.gif  Sounds like he likes sharing his life with his kids as much I do with mine. One day, I hope my daughter will thank me for (or at least be thankful!) that I offered her so many cool opportunities. We aren't the crazy soccer-mom family. We go BIG or we don't go!

 

My mantra is and always has been "life is too short".

post #20 of 25

I'm a bit late to this discussion, but in response to the OP: we've often travelled with kids, and yes, if money was tight or situation demanded it, we slept in the same room as our kids, at all ages.  Xela hits it when she says part of a parent's job it to teach their kids to deal with the world.  We've sometimes had separate bedrooms, sometimes not.  If we're staying one/two nights, it's a lot different than a full week at a resort. 

 

Different ages demand different considerations: early it's the bedtime hour and how much/little activity goes on after bedtime. Later, it's issues of privacy for adolescents.  But every time, it's a learning experience based on kids coming to understand issues such as money, availability of lodging, location, type of trip, etc., etc.  We all sleep in one family tent on our canoeing expeditions to Canada; when we went the first time to Steamboat for our first all-out family vacation, we got a condo with a separate loft. 

 

Relative to other comments...kids definitely benefit and internalize their experiences.   My kids learned to love the outdoors and the family activities and have gone on to become raft guides, snowboard instructors, and outdoors-oriented adults.

post #21 of 25

Different strokes for different folks.

 

The OP has a toddler and wife who hasn't started skiing yet. A business trip out west may not be the best way to introduce the family to the joys of skiing.  They could start at a local hill instead.  As someone said earlier, best to think long term.

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

Allow me to interpret what many have said in a different way...

 

One job of parents is to teach their children the norms of their world.  It's a disservice to non-infant children to mold the adult world around them.  The educational goal is for kids to fit into the world as presented to them, within reason.  Think: well-adjusted kids.

 

My wife and I decided long ago that international travel, skiing, camping and backpacking are part of "who we are" as a family.  My younger daughter was on a 6-hour flight at 7 weeks old.  My older daughter has stamps in her passport from 6 countries.  I didn't even have a passport until I could legally buy booze.  Unlike other parents I know, we take our kids to restaurants.

 

Be careful, though.  The goal is a long-term one.  The way to make, say, a life-long skier is different with some kids.  Not every kid should start at 3, as mine did.  There may be bumps in the road.  The equipment, the cold and exhaustion can bring out the worst in kids.  The goal is to associate the activity with enjoyment, not turn it into a punishment so one or both parents can ski.  There are a lot of judgement calls.  Many kids don't like skiing the first few times out.  Once they're over the hump, it may get much better.

 

This - Xela said it well. And like anything, after the first trip it gets much easier and less hassle, travelling as a family just becomes the new normal. What is your long-term goal for your family?

 

And in terms of business trips, my husband took time off to stay at home for a few months when our son was round a year old and I had a couple of business trips to different places including a ski resort (although that was summer) and they came two and we all had a great time and benefited from the change of everyday routine. Did you and your wife travel much before your daughter was born? What was nice about those trips was that they were just us, apart from the work schedule which was pre-determined, we weren't trying to be all things to all people, or run around and catch up with a million friends and family.

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

Allow me to interpret what many have said in a different way...

One job of parents is to teach their children the norms of their world.  It's a disservice to non-infant children to mold the adult world around them.  The educational goal is for kids to fit into the world as presented to them, within reason.  Think: well-adjusted kids.

My wife and I decided long ago that international travel, skiing, camping and backpacking are part of "who we are" as a family.  My younger daughter was on a 6-hour flight at 7 weeks old.  My older daughter has stamps in her passport from 6 countries.  I didn't even have a passport until I could legally buy booze.  Unlike other parents I know, we take our kids to restaurants.

Be careful, though.  The goal is a long-term one.  The way to make, say, a life-long skier is different with some kids.  Not every kid should start at 3, as mine did.  There may be bumps in the road.  The equipment, the cold and exhaustion can bring out the worst in kids.  The goal is to associate the activity with enjoyment, not turn it into a punishment so one or both parents can ski.  There are a lot of judgement calls.  Many kids don't like skiing the first few times out.  Once they're over the hump, it may get much better.

This sounds very similar to our experiences. Of course, there is not one right way for everyone.

As for sleeping, on ski trips I'm usually tired early and want to wake up early. Following the kids sleep schedule works very well for me. :-)
post #24 of 25

Depends on the age of the kids mostly, but ours stay in the room with us.  Mine aren't toddlers though, so how light/deep sleeping they are would dictate.  My daughter was a heavy sleeper, my son was not, so we tried to stick with their routine.  They're a bit older now (6 and 8) so it's less of a concern.  Besides, after a day of fresh air and exercise on the slopes, some food and night time stuff, they are OUT for the count. Noise isn't a factor, and privacy isn't really a concern since we make adjustments with kids in the room anyways.  

 

I suppose if we had an unlimited budget we'd get a 3 bedroom: 1 for each of them, 1 for me/wife.  Not an option though, we usually go with a 1 bedroom condo.  That still gives the pullout couch if needed for separate space.

 

Kids are resilient and adaptable; they'll get sleep.  Initial excitement on the first night might leave them a bit tired, but the exercise and excitement on the second day will catch up and they'll crash pretty hard.  Just try to keep things light and happy so they don't equate ski trips with being grumpy; they'll simply associate the two as linked, and end up hating skiing because they'll think it's a bad time.  We try to make the trips more like "events" and breaks from school, seeing new things, experiencing new things, put a big positive spin on it.  And the tired thing is then just a product of all the fun we had, not lack of sleep and kid-grumpy stuff.  Subtle but important difference.....the kids don't realize it, but we see the potential in the future, so we try to get things off on the right foot each road trip.

post #25 of 25

Often our kids share the room with us and they are 11 and 9. It is just that we don't feel like springing for another room - we just suck it up. We can afford to do so, we just chose not to.

 

Traveling is pretty tiring, no matter what you do for your activity. By the time you finish dinner etc. and the kids are asleep, you might want to climb in bed and watch something on your laptop/tablet. Skiing can be especially tiring and I'm not upset to sleep.

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